Creating your own Clone?

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Irisndfan2

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So our homebrew club is doing a Highland Brewing Co. clone competition.

I am going to clone their Oatmeal Porter. Normally when I do clones I usually find a recipe online, however this time I want to try and create it myself.

They list on their website the following:

Grains 2 Row Brewers Malt, Munich, Caramel 40, Caramel 60, Chocolate, Black & Flaked Oats

Hops Chinook, Willamette, & Cascade

ABV 5.9%

IBU 35

I think I can figure out the grain bill pretty easily based off of BJCP guidelines and using Beersmith to calculate ABV.

But how should I go about deciding the hop additions? It does not list for what the hops are used, how much, etc.

I would assume Willamette would be a later addition, but really have no idea how to go about doing this.

Any helP???
 

BigB

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Hop addition timing will depend on the profile of the beer. For example, if the beer is very hoppy in the nose, then there is probably some dry hopping going on. If it is moderately hoppy in the nose, then there is probably no dry hops, but some hops added within the last 5 minutes or so. If you get some hop in the nose, but lots of hop flavor, then there is probably some hop additions around the 20-30 mark. No to very little hops in the nose would indicate no to little late addition hops. Now obviously if you get lots of hop flavor and lots of aroma, then there is probably a combination going on (which would be the norm). That sounds like what the real challenge in your competition is... is to figure out the grist and hop timing. So carefully evaluate the beer and adjust your hop additions in an attempt to match the beer you are tyring to emulate. Bitterness hops are not going to be really discernable... in the case of your example, I would agree that wilamette would be a later addition hop. But I would also say that Chinook is probably just used for bittering. So you have to ask yourself when tasting the beer... do you get more cascade aroma or flavor... same for the wilamette. Then adjust your amounts accordingly. I doubt for an oatmeal porter there is any dry hopping going on, but I never tasted the beer, so I can't be sure. Also, as a general guideline, plan on getting the vast majority of your IBUS from the bittering hops. Also, generally you are going to be safe with 1/2 - 1 oz late additions for 5 gallon batches.

Edit: reading people's perception of this beer on beeradvocate, I would be surprised if there were any hop additons after 20 minutes. Also the hop character seems to be muted/mixed. I would probably put the cascade in at 30 minutes and the wilamette in at 20.
 
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Irisndfan2

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Hop addition timing will depend on the profile of the beer. For example, if the beer is very hoppy in the nose, then there is probably some dry hopping going on. If it is moderately hoppy in the nose, then there is probably no dry hops, but some hops added within the last 5 minutes or so. If you get some hop in the nose, but lots of hop flavor, then there is probably some hop additions around the 20-30 mark. No to very little hops in the nose would indicate no to little late addition hops. Now obviously if you get lots of hop flavor and lots of aroma, then there is probably a combination going on (which would be the norm). That sounds like what the real challenge in your competition is... is to figure out the grist and hop timing. So carefully evaluate the beer and adjust your hop additions in an attempt to match the beer you are tyring to emulate. Bitterness hops are not going to be really discernable... in the case of your example, I would agree that wilamette would be a later addition hop. But I would also say that Chinook is probably just used for bittering. So you have to ask yourself when tasting the beer... do you get more cascade aroma or flavor... same for the wilamette. Then adjust your amounts accordingly. I doubt for an oatmeal porter there is any dry hopping going on, but I never tasted the beer, so I can't be sure. Also, as a general guideline, plan on getting the vast majority of your IBUS from the bittering hops. Also, generally you are going to be safe with 1/2 - 1 oz late additions for 5 gallon batches.

Edit: reading people's perception of this beer on beeradvocate, I would be surprised if there were any hop additons after 20 minutes. Also the hop character seems to be muted/mixed. I would probably put the cascade in at 30 minutes and the wilamette in at 20.

Thank you! All of this makes sense. I am going to purchase a bottle and decipher what I am tasting.

I figured the Chinook was for bittering. Also need to taste it to try and figure out the grain bill.

Thanks agaiN!
 
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