Coupling vs. nipple welded in a keggle

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Alemaker

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What are the pros and cons of welding in couplings or welding in nipples in a keggle?

My boil keggle has a nipple welded in, but I'm replacing my coolers and adding a keggle MLT and HLT to my setup (building a Brutus 10 like system). I've already cut the tops, they just need some plumbing.

I'm taking the time to get it right, and wanted some input on which works better for the most applications.


Thanks!
 

Henrythe9th

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a coupler allows you to thread into both sides, if you welded a nipple in you couldn't easy install a dip tube
 

Ohio-Ed

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I think you see more couplings welded in than nipples.

IMO, a coupling gives the weldor a bit more margin for welding without damaging the threads. When welding a nipple, ant spatter can damage the threads.

Probably other reasons as well, just not thinking of them right now.

Ed
 
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What are the pros and cons of welding in couplings or welding in nipples in a keggle?

My boil keggle has a nipple welded in, but I'm replacing my coolers and adding a keggle MLT and HLT to my setup (building a Brutus 10 like system). I've already cut the tops, they just need some plumbing.

I'm taking the time to get it right, and wanted some input on which works better for the most applications.


Thanks!
:off:Is that Al Capone in your avatar? :off:
 

wilserbrewer

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With external threads, a nipple can get damaged if the keggle is banged around, this won't happen with the internal threading of a coupling.
 
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Alemaker

Alemaker

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OK. Thanks. I think I'll go coupling. It should allow a thinner profile since you don't have to worry about welding splatter getting on the threads.
 

Bigscience

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OK. Thanks. I think I'll go coupling. It should allow a thinner profile since you don't have to worry about welding splatter getting on the threads.
If you want a really thin profile for something like a sight gauge or RTD that you won't need to connect to the inside, you can also do a half coupling.
 

Bobby_M

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It's logical to go with a nipple for the lowest profile on the drain, but thread a cap on to the side he's gonna weld from to keep from weld damage. Nothing stops you from putting a siphon tube on the inside, you just need to use a connection with female threads. If copper, you'd use a female connector instead of a male.
 

Ohio-Ed

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It's logical to go with a nipple for the lowest profile on the drain, but thread a cap on to the side he's gonna weld from to keep from weld damage. Nothing stops you from putting a siphon tube on the inside, you just need to use a connection with female threads. If copper, you'd use a female connector instead of a male.
I don't think I would thread a cap on it before welding. They tend to "stick" when the weld heats the metal and then it cools. I had to cut a 2" plug out of a coupling for this very reason.

Ed
 

Bobby_M

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Clarification. Brass cap. Well, I mean I had a brass plug in all my couplings when they were welded because I was hoping to avoid warping. They didn't stick but YMMV. You can always just chase any threads with a tap or die if they get messed up.
 
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