Copper vs PVC Manifold

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davidkrau

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I've read with interest the dialog with respect to bazooka tubs and copper manifolds. With respect to square or rectangular coolers I think the easiest and cheepiest way to go is with 1 inch PVC Pipe and fittings. PVC is easy to saw with a hacksaw. and I drilled a zillion 1/32 inch holes. The pipe slides easily into the fittings and I used no glue so that the manifold can be easily taken apart for cleaning. Just like children's tinker toys. No soldering or welding and PVC is as cheap as dirt.
 

Indiana Red

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Sounds good to me. Though I admit is a lot less common than the other two methodes you mentioned. I have the bazooka tube type set-up and it works well. I don't know why PVC wouldn't do a ood job too though.
 

cweston

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davidkrau said:
PVC is easy to saw with a hacksaw. and I drilled a zillion 1/32 inch holes.
Sounds great. Wouldn't it be easier and less tedius to cut slits with a hacksaw, instead of drilling all those holes?
 

JimiGibbs

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Not an expert here but from what I have read be sure and use CPVC instead of PVC due to the heat in the process. It's a little more expensive and perhaps someone else here can reply as to exactly why ....
Jimi
 
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davidkrau

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You're right sawing slits with a hacksaw would have easier. I wish I thought of that first. 1/32 inch drill bitts ain't east to find. had to go to a hobby store. 89 cents each and I broke 2. They are very tiny. Anyway I got my directions from a library book, ( Building Brewing Equipment}- not the exact name of the book but close.

David
 
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davidkrau

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You must have read the same book I did. They suggested CPVC. Home Depot was out of some of the fittings that I needed and the guy in the plumbing dept thought that PVC would work. I used it once, the max temp was sparging, 170F but by the time the water hit the grain I doubt if it was that hot. Anyway, nothing melted. If I have to I can rebuild it with CPVC. I'd cut the slits with a hacksaw and since I know the length of the pipe I probably wouldn't take me more than 15 minutes.
 

clayof2day

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Do you have any pics you could post. I am interested in doing a manifold, my stainless steel braid setup is a pain in the but, but I'm not sure exactly how a manifold would connect to a bulkhead/valve setup out the cooler.

Just curious,

Matt
 

cowain

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At some point, I'll get off my lazy ass and post pics of the one I just made. I used CPVC for everything, glued nothing and it worked like a charm making my big belgian.

After getting the CPVC, I wondered if the PVC would have worked, because the temp ratings on the side of the CPVC were at a certain PSI. Since the PSI in the mash tun would be fairly low, I wonder if PVC would be fine. Of course, I didn't notice a difference in price of anything, so it's probably not worth the risk since you wouldn't save any money.
 

Baron von BeeGee

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I think the issue with PVC at high temperatures it that it releases hydrogen chloride...I'd be seriously concerned about using PVC at mash temperatures, but admittedly I'm not a chemist so I don't know how serious these issues are.
 
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davidkrau

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You got me scared. Anyway, I took some PVC and put in boilig water for about 10 minutas, I had another pan with plain water that I boiled at the same time. The PVC softened up just a little. I tested the PH of both the plain water and the water that had the PVC in it. The PH of both were the same, they both went from a neutral 7 (cold Water) to an 8 (boiled water) very slightly basic. I'm going to research this on the web . I may remake this thing anyway using CPVC.
 

MrSaLTy

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Baron von BeeGee said:
I think the issue with PVC at high temperatures it that it releases hydrogen chloride...I'd be seriously concerned about using PVC at mash temperatures, but admittedly I'm not a chemist so I don't know how serious these issues are.

I have also heard something like this.... it supposedly leaches out something (can't remember what) at mash temps and above. CPVC supposedly doesn't. Id stay away from PVC just in case.
 

Lost

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So, why not just use copper? No worries about plastic and chemicals and whatnot.. just make sure there's no blue green stuff on it and you're good. Copper is not very pricey anyhow.. the hard pipe stuff works well as does the soft flexible stuff and the soft tubing would allow you to make a circular manifold if you're using a gott type cooler (like I am). If you buy a lot of the tubing then you can take what's left and make it into a chiller or prechiller...

I'm not saying I'd never use plastic piping but to me copper just seems like a simple no fuss, no brainer solution. Besides, copper piping and manifolds definately look a lot cooler than plastic :rockin:
 

bikebryan

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davidkrau said:
You got me scared. Anyway, I took some PVC and put in boilig water for about 10 minutas, I had another pan with plain water that I boiled at the same time. The PVC softened up just a little. I tested the PH of both the plain water and the water that had the PVC in it. The PH of both were the same, they both went from a neutral 7 (cold Water) to an 8 (boiled water) very slightly basic. I'm going to research this on the web . I may remake this thing anyway using CPVC.
I'm no chemist, but I dont' think the problem here is whether or not the PVC gets softer or changes the PH of the solution. I think the issue is more along the line that at higher temps, the PVC may give off noxious chemicals into the solution - and you aren't likely to be able to check that at home.
 
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