Cooling in Apartment Homebrewing

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fusa

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I recently moved to a new apartment. Previously I would remove the aerator from the faucet and connect a male quick disconnect. I would connect the immersion chiller to this to cool and also fill my brewing vessel. The faucet is much nicer, but does not have the regular aerator to replace with a disconnect.

What is another way to cool after a boil? I have been suggested using a pump, but not sure if that would be the best method. I have both an immersion chiller and also have a counter-flow chiller. I would brefer not to top up with cold water. This seems to increase the risk of contamination.
 

hotbeer

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If you have to have the "best" method, then you might find yourself stymied at what to do for a long time or that the "best" method involves some really ridiculous amounts of cash and engineering.

I use a simple copper coil immersion chiller and during the summer when the water coming out of the tap is higher than the 68°F I'm trying to chill too, I just use a simple submersible aquarium water pump to pump ice water through it from a really big kettle. When the temp of the water coming out of the chiller gets cool enough I just let it recirculate back through the water bath.

Are there better ways? Perhaps and likely, but this is the easiest, simplest and least expensive for me since I already had the rolls of copper tubing to make my own chiller and the pump from a aquarium we use to have.
 

Skeeter686

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I'm in a similar situation, where my fancy faucet can't accept any kind of screw-on adaptor. I use a small fountain pump with a wort chiller, like hotbeer does. It generally works well for me.
 

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Does the faucet have a pull-down sprayer? If so it is usually very easy to unscrew the head and you can attach at that point. (The head is effectively just a big aerator).
 

bracconiere

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Yes it does have a pull down sprayer. I'll check to see if I can unscrew it. Thanks.


be sure to turn off the shut off under the sink before you do that, which would make it redundant not just to hook up to them...you'd only have turn one off then!
 

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fusa

fusa

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Does the faucet have a pull-down sprayer? If so it is usually very easy to unscrew the head and you can attach at that point. (The head is effectively just a big aerator).
Do you have an idea what the connection to a pull down sprayer would be? I'm thinking of using a plastic connection to a typical metal disconnect. So I screw the two plastic pieces together for each use. I don't want to thread a metal disconnect to plastic every time I brew. Guaranteed to strip at some point.
 

bracconiere

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Previously I would remove the aerator from the faucet and connect a male quick disconnect.
I don't want to thread a metal disconnect to plastic every time I brew.


when i read the first line from original post, i was thinking you meant something like this?

 

tracer bullet

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Some spray heads are easy to connect to, some are notoriously difficult and brand specific. Just have to have a look. Ideally pull it out from the faucet and see what screws onto the back side. Next option is likely an adapter under the sink to where the lines go.
 

tracer bullet

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and a pump like this really isn't TOO expensive...

Also


Or even


The latter is overkill for a chiller but opens a door to other options - whirlpool hopping, and so on.
 

bracconiere

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i've got a HC version of those little pump, i have to put my water bucket on the table 12" bellow the top to even get flow....

the other one, it needs to be primed, other then that? not sure, easier to clean then a sump i'd imagine....
 

tracer bullet

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Just depends on what your sprayer looks like and the hose leading up to it. Some connect at the spray head, some are a solid piece all the way back and under the sink. Well, not a solid piece of course, but an assembly made with parts you would not call user replaceable. Post up a picture if in doubt.
 

bracconiere

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i know it's an apartement, but could you just take the sprayer off, and run a new hose with a permentant quick dissconet you could put the spray back on, if you move out?
 

Brewdog80

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Do you have a dishwasher? You possibly can get a t fitting and come off that line. Put in a t with a valve... disconnect line when you move, leave t in place shut off....
 

seilenos

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Do you have an idea what the connection to a pull down sprayer would be? I'm thinking of using a plastic connection to a typical metal disconnect. So I screw the two plastic pieces together for each use. I don't want to thread a metal disconnect to plastic every time I brew. Guaranteed to strip at some point.

First thing to try is see how easy/difficult it is to remove the head.

If it is a PITA or otherwise annoying you might want to come up with a different solution.
If it is easy, unscrew it and bring it and your metal disconnect fitting to a hardware store and look for a plastic piece that will join the two.

That way you will only be connecting plastic to plastic yet still be able to user your disconnect.
 

seilenos

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You could also see if something like this could be modified for your purposes:


It slips over the faucet ... I swear I saw someone else on HBT that used something similar (which is why I had the idea to look it up).
 
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Dancy

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There are adapters out there for faucets without threads. I did some
looking when I was shopping for a new kitchen faucet but ended buying a threaded one.
CE72C101-115E-4EFC-B2E9-5F4BBCF193FC.jpeg 392BAB4D-DAAF-4AE1-97FD-9BE8A8B306C0.jpeg
 
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fusa

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SanPancho

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@fusa if the faucet thing doesnt work out this is what i did back when i had the same problem. you shut off the water line at the valve. unscrew the faucet supply hose, and then put this baby on. then your faucet supply hose goes on top of this guy and you're set to go. when its time to chill you just pop in some tubing and the blue handle controls the water for your chilling. you gotta assemble it once, and then you're done. easy peasy.

John Guest ASVPP5LF Angle Stop Adapter Valve, 1/2" x 3/8" x 1/4" OD: Amazon.com: Tools & Home Improvement
61BfftxMOKL._SX522_.jpg

they also make them with regular plumbing oriented outlets instead of the push connect. cheaper too. but then you gotta figure out total cost as you might need an adapter from 3/8 to 1/2 to GH or whatever. or you just just leave a 3/8npt x hose barb fitting on it, and you'd just have to pop your tube on and tighten a clamp.
 

CascadesBrewer

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I used to connect my immersion chiller by removing the aerator in my faucet...then I changed out the faucet for a model that does not have a removable aerator. I am sure there is some way to unscrew the spray and adapt that, but the connections vary by manufacturer.

I am using this $25 pump. I just hooked a small section of a garden hose to the barb on the pump, then connect my immersion chiller to that end.

A big benefit is that I can use tap water to cool my wort down to 90F to 100F, then switch over to circulating ice water to get fully down to pitching temps. In the summer my tap water is around 75F, so there was no way to get my wort down to 65F.

I have also used the pump to circulate cleaner through my tap lines and other transfer hoses. Overall it was one of the best inexpensive additions to my brewing equipment.
 

bwible

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Yes it does have a pull down sprayer. I'll check to see if I can unscrew it. Thanks.
This is what I have and I hate it. I unscrew the sprayer head. It has a ring at the top that unscrews. Then the head itself can screw off. Theres a male thread under there that I haven’t been able to find anything thats a good fit. I’ve spent hours at Lowes and Home Depot and more hours searching online. The closest thing I found is actually a beer nut that would go on the end of a beer faucet. Its very loose and I can only get it to work with about 7-8 pieces of teflon tape. And even then I can’t run water through the chiller with any pressure or it comes off. What I really would like to do is get rid of this whole faucet and put on a new one that will accept the standard garden hose/chiller fitting. I’m not that handy so I’ve been just dealing with it. I brew 3 gallon batches and it can take 30-35 minutes to cool from boiling because I can’t run any pressure through the chiller. Its a slow flow.

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fusa

fusa

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Hopefully will end up using something similar to what @SanPancho did. I'm still in middle of unpacking with a 50-60 hour work week. As long as done correctly it seems like the best unattended way to chill. The universal adapter has some bad reviews of it busting, so would have to check it often. I might just brew in the laundry room, 240 outlet is there and hot/cold water.
 

SanPancho

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Hopefully will end up using something similar to what @SanPancho did. I'm still in middle of unpacking with a 50-60 hour work week. As long as done correctly it seems like the best unattended way to chill. The universal adapter has some bad reviews of it busting, so would have to check it often. I might just brew in the laundry room, 240 outlet is there and hot/cold water.
ha! thats exactly what happened to me at our new place. just moved it on down to the laundry room. in that case, buy two of these-
81sypIstSzL._AC_SX679_.jpg

one for hot, one for cold. the washer gets its outlets, and the others are for you. i have cold side GHT adapter for my chiller, and the other i have an GHT-. barb adapter to some 1/4 tubing with a carbonation cap on the end. super easy to blast your corny QDs with hot water, then set it aside to be washed later.

@bwible you should really try the fitting i posted earlier. crazy simple. no problems at full blast. install it and you're done.
 

Teufelhunde

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I recently moved to a new apartment. Previously I would remove the aerator from the faucet and connect a male quick disconnect. I would connect the immersion chiller to this to cool and also fill my brewing vessel. The faucet is much nicer, but does not have the regular aerator to replace with a disconnect.

What is another way to cool after a boil? I have been suggested using a pump, but not sure if that would be the best method. I have both an immersion chiller and also have a counter-flow chiller. I would brefer not to top up with cold water. This seems to increase the risk of contamination.
I'm not in an apartment, but I brew indoors. To chill, I use a cooler filled with ice water and a submersible pond pump to push cold water into my chiller with the return going back into the cooler. I collect ice from the icemaker in my fridge into a plastic bag until I have around 20 pounds, which I store in my chest freezer until needed, along with a dozen of those freezeable "blocks" designed for coolers which I put in the freezer 2 days prior to brewing, and that allows me to chill to pitch temp with my Brewzilla supplied chiller (stainless steel and not the most efficient) in around 20 minutes.

Bonus is that the water left in the chiller is my cleanup water and get dumped on my climbing roses, so I basically get three uses out of the same water....

YMMV

Lon
 

Teufelhunde

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I'm not in an apartment, but I brew indoors. To chill, I use a cooler filled with ice water and a submersible pond pump to push cold water into my chiller with the return going back into the cooler. I collect ice from the icemaker in my fridge into a plastic bag until I have around 20 pounds, which I store in my chest freezer until needed, along with a dozen of those freezeable "blocks" designed for coolers which I put in the freezer 2 days prior to brewing, and that allows me to chill to pitch temp with my Brewzilla supplied chiller (stainless steel and not the most efficient) in around 20 minutes.

Bonus is that the water left in the cooler is my cleanup water and then gets dumped on the wife's climbing roses, so I basically get three uses out of the same water....that's important to Arizona folks....

YMMV

Lon
 

DuncB

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@fusa if the faucet thing doesnt work out this is what i did back when i had the same problem. you shut off the water line at the valve. unscrew the faucet supply hose, and then put this baby on. then your faucet supply hose goes on top of this guy and you're set to go. when its time to chill you just pop in some tubing and the blue handle controls the water for your chilling. you gotta assemble it once, and then you're done. easy peasy.

John Guest ASVPP5LF Angle Stop Adapter Valve, 1/2" x 3/8" x 1/4" OD: Amazon.com: Tools & Home Improvement
61BfftxMOKL._SX522_.jpg

they also make them with regular plumbing oriented outlets instead of the push connect. cheaper too. but then you gotta figure out total cost as you might need an adapter from 3/8 to 1/2 to GH or whatever. or you just just leave a 3/8npt x hose barb fitting on it, and you'd just have to pop your tube on and tighten a clamp.
Used one of these to plumb the water filter into the fridge worked great.
 

bobeer

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I'd try no chill brewing. It takes extra time to cool off but you don't have to mess with any plumbing or any of this stuff. Lots of threads here about it so check it out!
 

Deadalus

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I don't think anyone mentioned the bathroom sink faucet?

If it was my own property I'd just modify the supply line to wherever I wanted it. Personally I put a tee on a garage pex line then a sillcock valve with a wye added on for RO water feed and chilling using a plate chiller. But I don't know your apartment layout and your landlord might not allow modifications to that degree.

Be careful if you mess with the undersink supply lines. Those valves are usually kind of crappy, can stick and or break particularly if old. They aren't really made for repeated use. If it breaks, would you have access to get the main turned off quickly? Could be a little safer to use the washer hookup although those valves can freeze up too but easier in that you probably already have garden hose threads on your chillers. Seems you are leaning that way. Probably you're not in too old an apartment over there in Blacksburg, a lot of apartments built there in the last 20 years. (I'm just over the border in WV.)
 
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fusa

fusa

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I don't think anyone mentioned the bathroom sink faucet?

If it was my own property I'd just modify the supply line to wherever I wanted it. Personally I put a tee on a garage pex line then a sillcock valve with a wye added on for RO water feed and chilling using a plate chiller. But I don't know your apartment layout and your landlord might not allow modifications to that degree.

Be careful if you mess with the undersink supply lines. Those valves are usually kind of crappy, can stick and or break particularly if old. They aren't really made for repeated use. If it breaks, would you have access to get the main turned off quickly? Could be a little safer to use the washer hookup although those valves can freeze up too but easier in that you probably already have garden hose threads on your chillers. Seems you are leaning that way. Probably you're not in too old an apartment over there in Blacksburg, a lot of apartments built there in the last 20 years. (I'm just over the border in WV.)

Yeah tons of new apartments being built recently. This place isn't new but all appliances are, and valves don't seem too old. I'm in a 3 bedroom, the new places are well over $4k/month for this much space.
 

Deadalus

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Yeah tons of new apartments being built recently. This place isn't new but all appliances are, and valves don't seem too old. I'm in a 3 bedroom, the new places are well over $4k/month for this much space.
That's pricey! I've seen a few of the apartment floorplans for some of the new construction, they pop up in the FB Marketplace sometimes but never saw any prices. I would have liked to live there myself but the real estate prices were always outside my price range.

You mentioned 240V and maybe using the room to brew. Is there a laundry sink?
 
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