Converting Robobrew Brewzilla 35L 110v to 220v?

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justindenaro

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Hi everyone, I'm new to the forum so please let me know if I'm posting in the wrong place. I've brewed a couple batches with my 35L US model of the Brewzilla but obviously the boiling performance is pretty lackluster ... it can barely hold a rolling boil even with the neoprene sleeve.

Does anyone know if it's possible to find a 220v control board and replace the factory 110v board in order to run the system on 220v to get more power out? Or are the heaters and pump also only rated for 110v in the US systems and I'd have to buy the 220v system separately. Thanks in advance for the help!
 

IslandLizard

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I'd say every part in those "urns" would be 110V in the U.S., Canada, etc. Parts being pump, heaters, and power supply to the logic board.
In areas where 220V is the net voltage, those parts will be 220V. The logic board power supply may be dual 110V/220V, but who knows?
 
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justindenaro

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Yeah, I'm definitely not confident that the pump/heating elements won't burn up if I plugged it into 220. I really wish they would sell the same unit with both voltage capabilities. Probably just more expensive for them to source pumps/heating elements and custom build the electronics board to handle both voltages. Oh well...
 

doug293cz

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Yeah, I'm definitely not confident that the pump/heating elements won't burn up if I plugged it into 220. I really wish they would sell the same unit with both voltage capabilities. Probably just more expensive for them to source pumps/heating elements and custom build the electronics board to handle both voltages. Oh well...
Don't have specific information about the RoboBrew, but most electronics these days use switching power supplies which naturally handle multiple input voltages. Using DC pumps fed from a switching supply would solve the pump voltage problem. Then the only requirement would be a heating element that can withstand twice the voltage and four times the power. A 1650W @ 120V element would be 6600W @ 240V, and this would be a bit on the high side. A 5500W @ 240V element only produces 1375W @ 120V, and this would be way under powered as 1650W is marginal.

Brew on :mug:
 

RufusBrewer

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Look into using an ancillary source of heat. Brewhardware.com sells a product called the hotrod.

There are other products called bucket heaters. Maybe other solutions.

You need to consider powering such a device. Figure out how to budget your power consumption. Find out which socket is on what breaker. Will you need to control the power of you support heater?

It is not an automatic solution. But if you need another 1,000 -1,500 watts to get you over the hump, there might be a simple solution out there.

OTOH, $400 for a brand new shiny 240V model ain't so bad. 10.5 G Founders is $400 as well.

Do not overlook the cost of adding a 240V GFCI circuit. It is possible to get expensive.
 
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