Confusing Threads on CO2 and Beer Gas Tanks

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Clint Yeastwood

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I've been taking stock of my gas equipment, and it has left me confused.

For some reason, I have 4 5-lb. tanks. I thought I had three. I knew I had one beer gas tank and some CO2 tanks.

So, the beer gas tank and two of the CO2 tanks have female threads on the valves. The remaining CO2 tank has male threads. I thought I was down to one regulator, but it looks like I have three.

I don't remember everything about tanks and regulators. I have read that beer gas requires a different regulator, and that the tank always has a male thread. Here I am with a beer gas tank with a female thread.

I can tell which regulator I used for stout because it has only one tube connected. It looks like a plain old CO2 regulator to me.

Does anyone have any idea what's happening? Does anyone else have a CO2 tank with a male thread or a beer gas tank with a female thread? Do I really need a special beer gas regulator?
 
The gauges on the beer gas regulator have bent dials. I can't figure that out. They obstruct the needles. I can tell I have somewhere over 900 psi in the tank, but that's as far as the needle will go. The low side needle won't go past 10, so I guess that gauge has to be replaced. I don't believe it's possible to replace dials.
 
Far as I know beer gas should be female threads on the tank and co2 shoul be male threads on the tank and they use different regulators, beer gas has a much higher psi then co2 tanks do. The gauges are replaceable, I bought one from morebeer a few months ago.
 
Thanks.

I managed to bang the little collar off the gauge on the low side. Now I have to get the dial out so I can flatten it. Being eccentric, I happen to have a tool that removes and reinstalls watch hands, so I am seeing if I can get it to work here.
 
Nitrogen tanks need a CGA 580, CO2 tanks need a CGA 320... That is; female threads on a nitrogen tank, and male thread on CO2 tank. Any chance you can post pics of the regs and tanks you're referring to?
 
I'll be happy to post photos if they ever get to my Yahoo box. Sometimes it locks up when I send things from my phone.

It turns out I have 2 males and 2 females.

I threw out the regulator I was working on. It turned out the dials were bent at the factory, as was one of the needles. There was no way for the high side needle to go past 1000. I am guessing someone over there hit the Tsingtao a little too hard the night before work, because everything inside the gauges was badly misaligned. I got the low side working, but the high side was beyond hope. I guess I must have gotten used to using it as it was, just to tell me whether the tank needed filling. It was still good for that. If there is another explanation, I don't know what it is.

I made an effort to get the worst gauge off so I could replace it, but it was installed by the kind of person who uses an impact wrench to install an oil filter, so I threw the whole thing in the trash. It was coming off, but it wasn't worth it.

I have two male CO2 tanks, one female CO2, and one female beer gas tank.

Now that I have thrown out the bad regulator, I have two regulators left. One is male, and the other is female. I think I should replace the female because when my old keezer died, beer went all over, and the regulator sat in it for days before I realized. There is corrosion all over it.

I won't need another regulator until I make a stout, so no hurry.
 
Here are the tanks. The blue one is steel, and it's for beer gas. The rest are aluminum, for CO2.

I'm trying to find out whether the valve on the blue one is right for nitrogen. I would rather not die from having valve parts shoot through my head.

This is not my original beer gas tank. It's a swap. But as far as I know, it has the same valve the other one did. I got it swapped at a place that only did beverage gas. Bel Carbonics in Miami.
 

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Nitrogen tanks need a CGA 580, CO2 tanks need a CGA 320... That is; female threads on a nitrogen tank, and male thread on CO2 tank. Any chance you can post pics of the regs and tanks you're referring to?

Beer gas is usually in CGA 580 tanks but can be bought in CGA 320 tanks as well.
CO2 regulators can be used on beer gas tanks, but beer gas is under higher pressure.
CO2 is liquid in the tank, and beer gas being a mix of Nitrogen and CO2 is just compressed gas and usually a full tank of beer gas is in the neighborhood of 3000 psi.
 
Here are the tanks. The blue one is steel, and it's for beer gas. The rest are aluminum, for CO2.

I'm trying to find out whether the valve on the blue one is right for nitrogen. I would rather not die from having valve parts shoot through my head.

This is not my original beer gas tank. It's a swap. But as far as I know, it has the same valve the other one did. I got it swapped at a place that only did beverage gas. Bel Carbonics in Miami.


The left one has a CGA 580 connector (as does the right one)that is typically used for beer gas, nitrogen & argon among others.

Beer gas can be sold in either steel or aluminum tanks.
 
Web says the male valves are CGA320 and suitable for 3000 psi, so they are good for CO2 and beer gas. The only problem with them, apparently, is that they put me in a position where I have to have an adaptor in order to use all three CO2 tanks with the same regulator. So I should get rid of the female valve on the CO2 tank, either by swapping the tank or removing the valve and replacing it.

Maybe I should dig that nitro regulator out of the trash and try to swap the gauge. I was really mad when I threw it in there.
 
I got the gauges off, and I'm throwing them out. I ordered new ones from Amazon for a total of $25. Now I should be able to have beer gas.

The gas in the unused tank with the female valve does not smell like CO2, so I am wondering if I bought a spare beer gas tank. That would not be unlike me.

Update: yes, it's beer gas. So that's why I have two males and two females.
 
You're not going to get anyone to put pure CO2 into the tanks with the CG580 (female threads) so as long as it has that valve on it, it's an Argon, Nitrogen or Beer Gas tank. The valve in this case is what dictates what kind of tank it is.
 
the different threads are probably so you don't mix things up.

I had to change out the coupler on one of my co2 regulators when I got a nitro tank.
 
You're not going to get anyone to put pure CO2 into the tanks with the CG580 (female threads) so as long as it has that valve on it, it's an Argon, Nitrogen or Beer Gas tank. The valve in this case is what dictates what kind of tank it is.
Don't forget Helium. I have a helium tank with that thread. But at the cost of helium I am probably going to have it converted to Argon when I get it recerted.
 
CO2 regulators can be used on beer gas tanks, but beer gas is under higher pressure.
Sorry to necro but I just wanted to mention for others that only some some co2 gauges can be used for beer gas. I have one that has a max pressure rating of like 1500psi which is too low for beer gas but fine for CO2. Higher pressure units can have the $10 nipple swapped to CG580.
 
That's why I mention it. I have a metal taprite with an 1800psi inlet sticker, and another with a lot of plastic that's 1500 or 1800. If it's not marked higher, like 3000psi on the regulator, assume it's good for CO2 only. If it is good for 3k, you can get a $10 part and convert to N2.
 
Here are the tanks. The blue one is steel, and it's for beer gas. The rest are aluminum, for CO2.

I'm trying to find out whether the valve on the blue one is right for nitrogen. I would rather not die from having valve parts shoot through my head.

This is not my original beer gas tank. It's a swap. But as far as I know, it has the same valve the other one did. I got it swapped at a place that only did beverage gas. Bel Carbonics in Miami.
Your blue tank says what its for, and it's not for beer. Also the seal on CO2 tanks is the nylon washer at the end of the threads, you don't need tape.
1706723180214.png
 
Your blue tank says what its for, and it's not for beer. Also the seal on CO2 tanks is the nylon washer at the end of the threads, you don't need tape.

OK, its hard to see the label on the Blue tank, I'm curious as what it is.
IS THAT *NO (Nitric oxide)?
 
OK, its hard to see the label on the Blue tank, I'm curious as what it is.
IS THAT *NO (Nitric oxide)?
Label says “Compressed Gasses N.O.S.” (Not Otherwise Specified). My beer gas tank (75%N 25%CO2) has the same label. It’s for contents that don’t fall into a specific category, but still have to carry a hazmat label. Sometimes they have an additional label with the mixture of contents.
 
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I have the same label on my steel 40cf beer gas cylinder. When I bought it (used, from someone selling tanks via these very forums) it came sans any labels - but I was able to get it filled with 70/30 locally without any issue - repeatedly. Then that company went out, so the next time I needed it filled I took it to AirGas - and they refused to do anything with it because it didn't have that label "so it could have been filled with anything" they said. Arrgh!

So I took it to a small company that mostly deals with fire suppression and they did a hydro cert, filled it and stuck that label on it without batting an eye...

Cheers!
 
I have the same label on my steel 40cf beer gas cylinder. When I bought it (used, from someone selling tanks via these very forums) it came sans any labels - but I was able to get it filled with 70/30 locally without any issue - repeatedly. Then that company went out, so the next time I needed it filled I took it to AirGas - and they refused to do anything with it because it didn't have that label "so it could have been filled with anything" they said. Arrgh!

So I took it to a small company that mostly deals with fire suppression and they did a hydro cert, filled it and stuck that label on it without batting an eye...

Cheers!
Was gonna say just peel some of the sticker off :)
 
But it didn't come with any sticker, which as far as AirGas was concerned made that tank an unfillable orphan. Of course, now that a different company stuck a sticker on it, I expect AirGas would be chill now.

I have to say, there have been times I've left one of my local AirGas facilities feeling like my IQ dropped 5 points just being around the counter attendants 😟

Cheers!
 
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