Columbus hop profile

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

minduim

Active Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2009
Messages
30
Reaction score
0
Hi,

could someone give a brief description of the columbus hop profile? I've heard it can be used in place of Centenial. But how is its flavor and aroma like? I've read that it is "pungent", but I'm not sure what it means to be pungent :confused:

I'm going to do a smash recipe using viena and columbus, with US-05 dry yeast. So tips on the hops are welcome :)
 

TheTower

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2009
Messages
115
Reaction score
3
Location
Silver Spring, MD
I've never used them, but according to its website, Magic Hat's Spring IPA is made with columbus. It was a pretty good hop flavor. You might want to pick up a bottle if its available around you to try it out.
 
OP
M

minduim

Active Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2009
Messages
30
Reaction score
0
Thanks! Sadly I can't find this beer around here, so I guess I'll have to go "into the unknow" :)
 

Hugh_Jass

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2008
Messages
1,956
Reaction score
44
I've not used Columbus, so no personal experience to offer, but his info is taken from the Wiki:


Columbus (Tomahawk)
From Home Brewing Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search


General Hop Characteristics
Country of Origin: USA
Noble: No
Uses: bittering
Beer styles: American ales and lagers, especially American IPAs and stouts
Substitutions: Centennial, Pacific Gem
Chemical Composition
Alpha Acids: 14-18 %
Beta Acids: 4.5-5.8 %
Cohumulone: 29-35 %
Myrcene: 25-45 %
Humulene: 15-25 %
Caryophyllene: 7-12 %
Farnesene: less than 1 %
Total Oil: 1.5-3.5 %
Storage

(%AA/6 M/20 C):
poor
Growing Characteristics
Yield: very high
Harvest: mid to late season
This article discusses a specific variety of hops. For general information about selecting, using or propogating hops, see the main hop page

This high alpha acid bittering hop was developed from the Centennial hop by the HopUnion breeding program. It is a low-cohumulone hop which gives a clean but long-lasting bitterness to beer. It can also be used as a dry hop in larger American beers, such as Pliny the Elder by Russian River Brewing.

Tomahawk® is a registered trademark of Yakima Chief Ranches, LLC, under which they sell a hop believed to be identical to Columbus.
 

ericm

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
210
Reaction score
0
if you can find anderson valley's 'hop ottin' IPA where you live, that's mostly columbus. it's a very resiny, 'dank' aroma and flavor (a lot of people actually make the marijuana comparison in terms of aroma). one of my favorites!
 

DinoCow

Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
I had the Sly Dog 113 IPA this afternoon. The brewmaster said he's been using Columbus because it was hard to get Centennial hops. It had a clear resin bitterness. I thought it was assertive enough to give a nice base bitterness to the IPA, but it wasn't abrasive.
 

SteveM

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2005
Messages
1,573
Reaction score
17
Location
Philadelphia area
I made an "all Columbus" pale ale last year during the hops shortage. Two ounces in a five gallon batch, additions at various times throughout the boil. That beer smacked you right in the face before the first sip. Columbus hops really pack a wallop when used alone in that volume. It was a delicious but very challenging beer, for hop lovers only.
 

HOOTER

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
Messages
1,653
Reaction score
15
Location
Spokane, WA
Columbus Hops

I used Columbus in my last amber ale and found them to be quite profound, but pleasant at the same time. They do have a very strong flavor/aroma profile so don't overdo it, but I'm really a big fan of this hop in the right quantities and the right type of beer.
 

Potter1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2010
Messages
179
Reaction score
3
Location
Leavenworth, Wa
Raising a thread from the dead, I just tapped an all Columbus IPA, and it is FANTASTIC! Big earthy, resiny hop flavor, very powerful. used about five ounces total, most where late additions, with a 1.5 o bittering charge on top of a 1.070 base. MM MM Good
 

benharper13

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2010
Messages
351
Reaction score
2
Location
utah
because of the anderson valley hop ottin. Its really good, but not great on the gas.
 

edognight

Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2013
Messages
16
Reaction score
0
Location
St. Paul, MN
I did a one gallon barleywine/triple IPA with columbus and centennials. Columbus added heavy early, and centennials added heavy late, and it was very good. I am going to scale it up for a 5 gal extract today, and hope it turns out 1/2 as good, and I will be happy.

Love me some centennials at 5 and 0 min!!
 

jonnyp1980

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2012
Messages
757
Reaction score
44
Location
Kittery
Columbus hops are my favorite hops to use for bittering 2-3 oz equals a nice punch to your buds!
 

Calichusetts

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2011
Messages
3,022
Reaction score
538
Location
Plymouth
Love Columbus...done it solo and with several IPAs split with one other hop. Most hit it on the head, dank and resin. I am always surprised at how potent it is as well
 

AventinusCam

Active Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2012
Messages
26
Reaction score
2
Location
Pittsburgh
I might be late to the thread, but I love Columbus. It is easily my favorite hop that isn't chic or fashionable (mosaic, amarillo, citra, nelson, ect). It is very earthy. The good thing is the balance is pretty nice. Big citrus aroma/flavor to go with the earthy/piney flavor and aroma. Have also used it many times and never got the cat pissy characteristics you sometimes get with simcoe and such. I recommend it highly.
 

neosapien

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2012
Messages
706
Reaction score
143
Location
Dallas
Columbus/Simcoe is one of my favourite combos for big hoppy beers.
 

AventinusCam

Active Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2012
Messages
26
Reaction score
2
Location
Pittsburgh
I did a mosaic/columbus blonde ale early in the year and it blew me away. The combo of the two was really something special.
 

woozy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2013
Messages
1,297
Reaction score
131
This post. Bookmark it.

this page which leads to this page.
could someone give a brief description of the columbus hop profile?
"become popular for its oil profile. Great for dry
hopping."

I've heard it can be used in place of Centenial.
"Possible Substitutions
Nugget, Chinook, Wye Target, Northern Brewer,
possibly Centennial "

But how is its flavor and aroma like?
"Aroma Pungent; Typical Beer Styles
US IPA, US Pale Ale, Stout, Barley Wine, Lager
(Bittering) "

I've read that it is "pungent", but I'm not sure what it means to be pungent :confused:
Pungent means pungent. Um. Sharp and aromatic. A bit powerful and bold.

I like it.
 

winvarin

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2009
Messages
1,116
Reaction score
60
Location
Edmond
I just pulled a bunch of Columbus off my bine today. This is my first yield off this plant and my first real experience with Columbus

I am thinking about doing 5 gal of extract IPA from Brewing Classic Styles just to get a sense of the qualities I would get from the home grown version.

I am figuring either going pellet Columbus for bitterness, then using my hops for flavor and aroma. Or maybe using something more neutral like horizon or magnum to bitter, then still going with mine for bitterness.

I know I would get a better sense of what Columbus brings to the table if I make it a single hop beer. But I would think I'd get a better sense of what MY Columbus brings to the table if I go with the neutral hop early and my hops late.

Suggestions?
 

Calichusetts

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2011
Messages
3,022
Reaction score
538
Location
Plymouth
Bittering with columbus pellets is fine. You will still get your hops to come through easily. Go overboard at flameout and with a dry hop...maybe whirlpool too. This will really let it shine. You could also make a hop tea to get a sense of the aroma/flavor
 

BreezyBrew

IPA is my spirit animal
Joined
Feb 12, 2012
Messages
3,701
Reaction score
571
Location
New Tampa
If you have ever had any commercial examples of beers with Chinook hops, I think they are similar. They have been described as "dank". What does that mean? To me it is the opposite side of the spectrum of noble hops. They are a bit vegetative and wild. You probably will either like this or not. Personally, I love them, they are very "loose" tasting. Would I want them in every beer? No, but I enjoy them in the ones I have had.
 

GuruGerald

New Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2015
Messages
3
Reaction score
2
I have kept detailed records of all my brews for several years. After a while it has been noticed that the slightly chemical, powerfully pungent smell and taste I have had in some brews is caused by Columbus Hops. Now I will use up my supply in stouts, and not buy anymore. Summit hops have more Alpha Acid without the earthy back taste.
 

rhys333

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
May 27, 2013
Messages
3,095
Reaction score
1,145
Location
Edmonton
I used Columbus once a few years ago in a batch of what I intended to be Centennial Blonde. Centennial was unavailable at the time so I subbed in Columbus and to my surprise it turned out wonderful. The Columbus/Cascade combo produced an amazing floral aroma. I'm intrigued by the citrus, piney, and early descriptions of this hop and since I can get them dirt cheap ($17/lb) I decided to test them out in an American Wheat. I brewed the following last weekend and I'm really looking forward to the taste test:

AMERICAN WHEAT 5.5 gal / 1.052 / 28 IBU
60% Wheat
32% 2 Row
8% Oats
0.1 oz Warrior @ 60
1 oz Columbus @ 10 & 0
US-05
 
Top