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COLD MASH process/recipe development thread

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seanjmc

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Cudos to those who founded the Genesis of this method - you know who you are if you are. Please search past threads on this topic if you want to know more than what is below.

I'll state that the Baseline method involves: steeping malted and crushed grains at least 12 hours in a fridge with more water than a usual mash. Some kind of cold water sparge, then boiling wort as usual. Recommended to back off the hops a bit from a regular recipe. Goal is to extract only sugars that were converted during germination process only, but also take flavors and proteins from the malt. It is speculated that spent grain can also then be mashed at regular temperatures to achieve further conversion and then make another beer with that (probably with adding more new crushed malt). ABV's seem to be in the 1-2% range.

Variations of this Baseline that have been tried is good information - please post your reasoning/idea spark for varying, conclusion and your ideas for further development.

I would like to start by saying the last batch I did was 2% ABV saison with pils, some vienna and flaked oats, also added salt that is perceptive to some people in an effort to build body. Beer was thin and strange but some people really liked it. I drink it with dinner often. It's very different than the regular method saison, tastes like lemons for some weird reason. I under-hopped it too much. Yeast was Wyeast 3726, but have made it my own with 15 batches of beer fermented around 85F. Also fermented this batch at 85F.

For the next round, will add more hops (added 1/3 of what I usually do the first time, will add 1/2 this time). And, in an effort to build body, was going to substitute rye for the oats. Also, wanted to 'steep' the vienna in the boil to get more flavor and body out of it like you do with an extract brew. Was also thinking about floating the flaked grains in the water while it heats but pull it out before it boils. Any thoughts on these ideas? Thanks, Sean
 

BrewnWKopperKat

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I thought I'd share links for what I have found (over the years). [...]

Here's a PPT that's essentially the same as the HomeBrewCon 2016 presentation:

This might be the blog from one of the posters in one of the /r/homebrewing topics.

/r/homebrewing had a couple of long (for them anyway ;)) topics on it:
Couple of additional links at Briess's site:

Before /r/homebrewing, there were a couple of bloggers who posted results (apparently a year after attending HomeBrewCon 2016)
And a couple of additional links that may (or may not) be interesting:

If you have a BYO digital subscription: Brewing Table Beer: The challenges of making a 3% ABV beer - Brew Your Own
edits: fixed URLs that were broken by 'helpful' software.
 
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BrewnWKopperKat

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Sub 1.030 beers seems to be continuing to attract a number of people interested in making low ABV beers.

@seanjmcm, have your listened to the Homebrew Con presentation on cold extraction?
 
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seanjmc

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Have not, can't find it in 'Home-brew Con Seminars' tried NEM, cold extraction and cold mash in the search area. I read the PPT above, but it is not that great on its own. But from what I am gleaning, it's interesting to see how it is not only the lower gravity people are after but different flavor characteristics of the grain. My first batch tasted like I added lemongrass - super different - like some kind of Gruit Ale.

It's new to my thinking about this that people still do a 'mash' of sorts by holding the drained solution at the desired conversion temperature, although many people don't do this in order to keep the ABV down. On my first batch I ramped it right up to boil so the time for conversion was very brief and ABV was 2%.

I just did two batches, in the fermenter. One batch I did a 'mash' with the fluid from the base grain only and soaked the flaked rye and Vienna in that warmed solution - not in the fridge. Gravity of that batch was way higher than I expected, coming in at 1.036, and with the yeast I use, 3726, it will end up being 4.2%. I did another batch in which I only 'mashed' the flaked rye and Vienna in a separate small pot and then added that to the other fluid from the pilsner only and brought everything up to boil. That OG was 1.024 and looking to end at 2.8%. Will know in two weeks how it all tastes.
 

BrewnWKopperKat

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