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Cold Crashing?

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Timmyg316

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Hello one and all,

First I would like to apologize if the topic name is miss-leading. I really do not know if what I am about to ask is an example of cold crashing since I really don't know what that is but here it goes...

A while ago someone recommended a possible method for preventing honey from fermenting in bottled beer where you add the honey to the beer after it has fermented, bottle it right away, then chill it at the point in time where the beer is carbonated but the flavour and sweetness of the honey remains. Is this an example of cold crashing?

I have a two questions related to this.

1)what would the effect of freezing the bottled beer be? Would it kill all the yeast? Rupture the bottle? Screw up the beer? Would there be any problem returning this beer to room temperature or fridge temperature in the bottle?

2) what temperature does the fridge need to be at to stop fermentation. I know the answer to this question depends on what yeast is being used, in this case its http://www.wyeastlab.com/rw_yeaststrain_detail.cfm?ID=132 . Does the data sheet mean I have to be below 46F or is that just the optimal working temperature for the yeast. I feel like I should email the manufacturer just to be sure
 

deepcdan99

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Won't be able to answer all of your questions but here goes...

First off, cold crashing is the process of dropping the temperature of the fermenting beer to drop any suspended yeast and proteins to the bottom of your fermenter. This helps to clarify your beer.

1.What would the effect of freezing the bottled beer be?
Probably nothing

2.Would it kill all the yeast?
Most likely will kill most of the yeast, but not all of it

3.Rupture the bottle?
Just like freezing anything inside glass, yes most likely will break some bottles

4.Screw up the beer?
Probably not

5.Would there be any problem returning this beer to room temperature or fridge temperature in the bottle?
I wouldn't get them too warm

6.What temperature does the fridge need to be at to stop fermentation?
Drop it to freezeing or as close to as possible 30-32, beer won't freeze until much lower because of the alcohol

7.Does the data sheet mean I have to be below 46F or is that just the optimal working temperature for the yeast.
The is optimal temp range, that yeast will ferment at temps above and below those ranges.

Hope that helps.
Also, you can use honey malt which in my opinion, can impart more of a honey flavor to beer than real honey itself. You could also look up the use of honey as your priming agent for bottling, which is kind of the process you have explained. Most people add suger to bottle carbonate, you could use honey. Not axactely sure how much but sure someone on here could help you out there.
 

ThreeSheetsBrewing

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You could check out the cider forums on how to do stove top pasturization. It's a little tedious, but a better way to avoid blowing up a bunch of bottles.
 

BrewerinBR

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Won't be able to answer all of your questions but here goes...

First off, cold crashing is the process of dropping the temperature of the fermenting beer to drop any suspended yeast and proteins to the bottom of your fermenter. This helps to clarify your beer.

1.What would the effect of freezing the bottled beer be?
Probably nothing

2.Would it kill all the yeast?
Most likely will kill most of the yeast, but not all of it

3.Rupture the bottle?
Just like freezing anything inside glass, yes most likely will break some bottles

4.Screw up the beer?
Probably not

5.Would there be any problem returning this beer to room temperature or fridge temperature in the bottle?
I wouldn't get them too warm

6.What temperature does the fridge need to be at to stop fermentation?
Drop it to freezeing or as close to as possible 30-32, beer won't freeze until much lower because of the alcohol

7.Does the data sheet mean I have to be below 46F or is that just the optimal working temperature for the yeast.
The is optimal temp range, that yeast will ferment at temps above and below those ranges.

Hope that helps.
Also, you can use honey malt which in my opinion, can impart more of a honey flavor to beer than real honey itself. You could also look up the use of honey as your priming agent for bottling, which is kind of the process you have explained. Most people add suger to bottle carbonate, you could use honey. Not axactely sure how much but sure someone on here could help you out there.
+1 on this
Further:
I use honey to carbonate many of my lighter beers including IPA's and Pale Ales. Honey is 100% fermentable sugar and will be completely consumed by the yeast. As far as I can tell using honey as a priming sugar leaves no honey flavor in the beer. To get honey flavor use honey malt. If you use a priming sugar to carbonate and honey to flavor you will over carbonate.
 

BeerLogic

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The only safe method I know of to back-sweeten a beer without producing bottle bombs and still have it carbonated is to kill the yeast by some method (pasteurization or campden tablets) after fermentation, force carbonate in a keg, and bottle with a beer gun. I've tried refrigeration to stop fermentation before (making ginger ale in a 2-liter soda bottle) with disastrous results, even dropping it to 33F. Bottle bombs every time. It's bad enough with plastic; I wouldn't risk it with glass bottles.
 

oldstyle69

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im not 100% on this, but you prolly could invert honey so that it dosnt ferment. honey is a bit more complex, since its got more junk in it. but it can proly be done.
 
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