CO2 Serving pressure

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Turfgrass

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I've had a keg of NEIPA under 8 psi for the last three weeks. I assume it is carbonated and ready to drink. What serving pressure do you recommend? The tap line tubing is 3/16" i.d. and I believe its between 11 and 12' long. I has a chart with tap setup recommendations, but I can't seem to find it. The co2 tank is at ground level and the keg is in my keezer. All of the plumbing runs through the 2x6 collar of the keezer and through a manifold to the taps. What would you recommend for serving or altering my setup? Thank you.
 

VikeMan

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Your serving pressure should match the pressure you used to carbonate, assuming you are serving at the same temperature and that your carbonation is where you want it. Given all that, it's the line length that should be adjusted. For 8 PSI and 3/16" ID tubing, you're probably looking at no more than 4 feet. 5 feet tops.

But... what temperature were you carbonating at and what level (volumes) of CO2 were you targeting? Unless the beer was really cold, the beer is probably somewhat under-carbonated for the style.
 

Yooper

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8 psi at fridge temp would be a low carbonation level. See
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Mine is set at 12 psi all the time. If I have a lower carbonated beer, I will reduce it but usually it's just at 12 psi constantly.
 

TheBluePhantom

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I have lines that long, at 10 to 12 psi, 37F I get 6 to8 second pours. Low foam. I like the lines at about 1 foot per psi, I use 25 foot lines for root beer, and it still puts a head on it no matter how delicate you are. but I don't get a glass of foam.
 

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I've had a keg of NEIPA under 8 psi for the last three weeks. I assume it is carbonated and ready to drink. What serving pressure do you recommend? The tap line tubing is 3/16" i.d. and I believe its between 11 and 12' long. I has a chart with tap setup recommendations, but I can't seem to find it. The co2 tank is at ground level and the keg is in my keezer. All of the plumbing runs through the 2x6 collar of the keezer and through a manifold to the taps. What would you recommend for serving or altering my setup? Thank you.
The one thing not mentioned is temperature - and that matters - a lot - wrt carbonation level vs pressure. So, if you can provide the average temperature of your kegs, we can dial this in for you :) Meanwhile...11-12 feet of 3/16" ID solid PVC tubing (eg: the ubiquitous Bevlex 200) is a solid configuration and should be good for up to 12 psi or maybe a bit more as long as all other factors are well controlled (particularly, temperature).

Fwiw...my neipas are held at 36°F and 11 psi at the keg for a carbonation level of ~2.5 volumes. I do the "set and forget" method of carbonation - which in this case means apply 11 psi at 36°F for a bit over two weeks...

Cheers!
 
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Turfgrass

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I'm still trying to dial in my keeper temp. It seems to get close to freezing and then it shuts off until it reaches the set 38*. When the compressor shuts off, I have a circulation fan set to run. I have the INKBIRD ITC-608T controlling a Kenmore. There is no hint of ice inside. Should I bump the psi up?


I also only have one pressure regulator controlling a manifold, so I'd like to have one common serving pressure for a few different styles of beer. What would be a good psi for carbonating and serving a variety of beers? Also 3/16" tube length? 1' per psi? Thank you.
 
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VikeMan

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I'm still trying to dial in my keeper temp. It seems to get close to freezing and then it shuts off until it reaches the set 38*. When the compressor shuts off, I have a circulation fan set to run. I have the INKBIRD ITC-608T controlling a Kenmore. There is no hint of ice inside. Should I bump the psi up?
The setpoint on your controller is relatively meaningless. You need to know the average temperature.

I also only have one pressure regulator controlling a manifold, so I'd like to have one common serving pressure for a few different styles of beer. What would be a good psi for carbonating and serving a variety of beers? Also 3/16" tube length? 1' per psi? Thank you.
First, decide the Volumes of CO2 you want (e.g. 2.5 volumes).

Then measure the average temperature in the keezer, at mid keg height. This will take a while. Measure, record, repeat. Then average.

Next, the pressure needed naturally follows. Consult a chart like the one @Yooper posted above.

Last, determine the length of tubing (either with a calculator or trial and error) needed to balance against that pressure.

But without knowing that average temperature (which is a proxy for the beer temp), nobody can tell you how much pressure is needed for "X" Volumes of CO2.
 
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Turfgrass

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I can place a digital temperature gauge mid keg and get the high and lows to average the temp. I probably need to be around 2.2-2.3 for the NEIPA and stouts to pressurize together.
 

VikeMan

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I can place a digital temperature gauge mid keg and get the high and lows to average the temp.
That's the idea. But don't just measure the high and low points (2 numbers) and average them together. It won't be a true average temp because the cooling and warming don't happen at the same rates.

Take lots of measurements, every "X" minutes, and average those, and make sure you've gone through some whole number of cycles.
 
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Turfgrass

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I took 9 measurements every ten minutes and came up with a 36.5 * average.

I think if I bump it to 8.5 psi then i will be in a decent range for the beers styles that i wish to brew.

Now would I have to cut the dispensing line to the tap to 8.5'?
 

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Now would I have to cut the dispensing line to the tap to 8.5'?
NO. Because the only problem with a longer line is a slow pour. If the line is "too long" (it won't be), the worst thing that can happen is it will take another second longer to pour a beer.

8.5 psi is pretty low. You may find that you want to have higher carbed beers on occasion, so I'd go with 11 or 12' and leave them.
 
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