Co2 leaking into liquid line with sankey adapters.

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Hwk-I-St8

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I'm guessing that it's not CO2 bleeding over since. It's probably outgassing. If you're beer is carbed to a given level (say 12 psi @ 36 degrees) and you have your CO2 set to lower than that or temp higher than that (or both), some of the CO2 in solution will come out. It then rises up the liquid out tube and the first beer after an interval will pour foamy. One poured immediately after will pour OK. visible bubbles in the liquid line is the standard way to check for outgassing.

Many people run into this if they have too short a hose so they dial back the CO2 to get it to pour less agressively, but then outgassing happens and they still get foamy beer. You need to ensure you have the correct length/diameter hose for the pressure you're serving at.

You may also see this if there is temp stratification in your kegerator. I used to get this but I added a tower chiller fan which also recirculates the air in the kegerator. Now I just need to ensure I have the proper pressure/temp settings for the beer on tap and it pours great.
 
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Lunkerking

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Thanks for the explanation. I have a fan to eliminate the temp stratification. The keg definitely got shook up on the way home yesterday. I was hoping it would settle out by now but there seems to be another problem.
 
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Lunkerking

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Unfortunately still having this problem. Maybe I need to put another washer in.
 

Homergah

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How is it getting gas in the line without leaking beer out?

Edit: Now I see. The link to the adapter you're using didn't load before. Didn't realize you're hooking up to a sanke. So... Nevermind.
 
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Bobby_M

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I wouldnt blame the ball lock adapter. I would check the smaller gasket on the bottom of the coupler. That keeps the gas and liquid separated on the way out of the keg.
 
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Lunkerking

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Yes first time using the coupler too. Maybe that is it. What should the gasket look like?
 
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Lunkerking

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I checked out the bottom of the coupler definitely has a new black gasket. It’s a kegco coupler.
 

Qhrumphf

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Did you purchase the *keg* or is this a commercial beer you purchases a keg of?

Check the keg seal itself. Sometimes due to abuse the seal on the keg gets damaged, and that could be where the mixing is occuring.

Also, can you verify that your keg and coupler work together? Most (almost all) American breweries use a D-type coupler, and when you buy a "sanke coupler" you're typically buying a D-type as well. However, there's a minority of American brewers, and a bunch of breweries from other countries, that use something OTHER than D-type. Most are very easy to tell apart and mismatched couplers/valves simply can't be used together at all, however, D-type and S-type can be very easily confused, and it's possible to use the wrong coupler on the wrong keg, both leading to their own problems (but both could foam).
 
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Lunkerking

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Ok it is a type d coupler. I detached the co2 and purged the keg. Will pour one later today and see what happens.

It is a Keg from ska brewing.
 

Qhrumphf

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I assume you're using cornie kegs normally (hence the ball lock adaptor). Do those pour properly? Or is this the first time you've used this system at all?
 
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Lunkerking

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I assume you're using cornie kegs normally (hence the ball lock adaptor). Do those pour properly? Or is this the first time you've used this system at all?
Yes. Corny kegs and they pour properly. When I’ve had this problem before it was due to poppet not tightened perfectly on keg.
 

Qhrumphf

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Then barring any drastic carb differences (basically you overcarb your own beers with a long line and now a beer with a more standard carb is breaking out), which is probably not the issue, it's not something to the overall setup (temp stratification, line setup, etc), and is probably something physical between the keg valve to the adaptor.

You're either getting gas mixing, or a leak. I've seen tiny leaks that seal under the pressure of a closed tap, but once the tap is open the pressure drops and it seems like you get some venturi effect drawing air into the line (me theorizing there). Seen it when the wrong o-rings are put on, or too tight (not tight enough it tends to leak beer out). Or, the leak could be what's causing breakout. And once you get a little foam in the line from either, it creates more foam.

Given that this is a retail circulation keg, I'd still get a flashlight and look really closely at the valve on the keg itself. That rubber seal is all that separates the gas flow and the liquid flow, and if that seal is damaged, you push CO2 right into the beer line, and that's your issue. It's a very normal occurance. They damage with time (rotting out and needing period replacement), or, if someone forces an S-type coupler onto a D-type keg valve, it can damage it that way. Or any other form of abuse. The brewery (or whatever keg fleet) might not even be aware of it (although most breweries, responsible ones at least, check those when filling them). If there's any cracking or chipping to that valve seal, that's likely your problem. In which point I'd call up the place you bought the keg, explain the issue, and ask to swap it out for a replacement keg.

If that valve looks good, I'd rebuild the coupler. Pay very close attention to the o-rings- the one that goes on the end of the coupler probe looks very similar to a standard hex nut o-ring, but is actually slightly larger. If it's a brand new coupler that's likely not the problem, but I've seen the wrong ones get put the wrong places and cause problems.
 
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Lunkerking

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I cant find any damage...this keg in my keezer is furthest from the fan that I use to eliminate temperature stratification. I am going to move it closest to the fan. It just seems that outgassing hypothesis seems to make the most sense given that I see bubbles just trickling up from the keg into the beer line.
 
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Lunkerking

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After moving the keg to the area closest to the fan, the bubbles have greatly decreased in my beer line. Now the keg that is furthest from the fan has bubbles in the line. I think this issue only appears when its really cold in my garage as is it is now in Colorado, or really warm. I have moved the fan to get more air moving across the beer lines, hopefully this will fix the issue. I may also install a second fan on the other side of the keezer.

Thanks for all the suggestions.
 
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Lunkerking

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I turned down the temp to 38. No more air in beer lines but still pours too fast and foamy. Turned down the pressure to about 10 from 12 will see what effect that has.
 
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Lunkerking

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This is finally pouring well. I guess it was just a temperature difference between what it was stored at the beer store vs my keezer.
 
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