CO2 Leak...Somewhere

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boredatwork

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I've already tried to find some tips to find my CO2 leak. The most common recommendation is soapy water or StarSan spray bottle. So far the best suggestion I have seen is to duct tape around the rubber handles and fill the whole top with sanitizer.

I think between those options I should be able to find the source of my leak, but I don't mind hearing any other suggestions.

The question I have is it common for "reconditioned" kegs to leak? This is the first time I am using these kegs and I am wondering if I got what I paid for.

I have two 5g cornies, and it seems both of them leak. I refilled my CO2 tank about a month ago and it now it is completely empty. I had only dispensed maybe 10 glasses from one keg, and the other keg had just finished carbing. From what I have read it seems a 5# CO2 cylinder should last longer than that.

Also, when I disconnected the empty gas in lines from the kegs when I found out the CO2 was gone, a few days later I went to test if the kegs were still pressurized, and when I pulled the release valve nothing came out. Is this expected? Also, what is the best way to "pressure test" a keg?
 

Arkador

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reconditioned kegs are often only checked to hold pressure, and only replace orings if they are found to leak. Not all of them include a new set of orings as part of the reconditioning process. You should have 2 spare sets of orings on hand, incase you need then.
 

Parva

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First and foremost, with the regulator, piping and grey disconnect fitted to the pipe, have you tried turning the gas on for a moment and back off WITHOUT the disconnect being fitted to the keg?

You should be able to turn the gas on for a second and back off and the gas regulator should remain at whatever pressure you've set indefinitely! If it drops (even after 24 hours) then your leak isn't the keg itself.
 

Dubcut

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Do you think you could fill it with a little CO2 and dunk it face down in a sink? Just look for bubbles? Just like finding a leak on a tire right?
 

schristian619

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Also, check your hose connections. I just found a slow leak there the gas line meets the manifold. I fixed it with plumbing tape. Just mix a spary bottle of star san and spray away, you'll find where the leak is.
 
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boredatwork

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My plan is to use the duct tape trick to test the keg.

But first I am going to hook up the regulator and gas lines and stick them in a tub of water to see if there any leaks between the CO2 tank and the keg.

My only fear is that I wont find a leak. Then I will just be utterly confused.
 
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