Co2 Issue, assistance please

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WhyTee

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Hello. This morning wasn't awesome. Last night I kegged two of my beers and put them on some Co2 in the keggerator. I woke up this morning and went to look in the fridge to make sure there were no leaks and there was this hissing sound coming from the release valve of the second connection.

The gauge showed that it was maxed out on pressure and I guess it was blowing off from the release valve. I tried turning off that particular valve but it wouldn't cut the gas to the keg, so I just turned off the entire tank since I needed to get to work.

It seems to me that something has failed inside the valves connected to the tank. Anyone have an idea of what it might be? I guess I'm going to take it apart when I get home and see if any o-ring or gasket is broken.

I feel fortunate that the pressure didn't blow the hose off the nipple, my morning could have sucked a whole lot more :D
 

JesseRC

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well we'll probably need some pics. Release valves are on each keg, and I believe the tank also has one. Do you have a manifold that splits you co2 to each keg? Do you know what was the readings on the 2 gauges. The tank gauge has high pressure readings and the other monitors what is being supplied to the kegs from the regulator. Do you recall what you set it to when you attached it to the kegs last night?
 
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WhyTee

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Thanks for your response. Some more details. It is a small manifold that splits the air to both kegs with a release valve for each keg on the manifold. I had set both kegs for 15psi and this morning the keg connected to the end of the manifold (furthest from the tank) gauge showed max PSI needle was all the way over and gas was blowing off from the release valve on the manifold for that particular keg.

I tried just turning off the gas for that particular keg, but gauge still showed maxed out pressure with the release still blowing off. I hope this helps a little bit more. I can take some pictures when I get home if I'm hard to follow.
 

JesseRC

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I'v never seen a release valve a a manifold. It sounds like you regulator is broken. I believe clockwise increases pressure and counter clockwise lowers the pressure of co2 sent out of the regulator. THere is diaphram in there, some repair kits are sold. You'll have to do a bit of troubleshooting when you get home to see if the regulator is allowing you to adjust pressure.
 
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WhyTee

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It won't allow for pressure change. Pressure stays maxed out even when I close the valve. I'll mess around with it more when I get home though. I guess I should order a new manifold.
 

JesseRC

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No, manifold does not control pressure. THe regulator does. Yes we need pics. THe manifold only shuts off co2 to that keg. Good luck.
 

Bobby_M

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You keep saying "close the valve" but most setups will have a hose off of each regulator and ALSO a on/off valve right before going to each keg. Have you turn the regulator screw clockwise? If your regulator adjustment screw is all the way backed out, it will send high pressure to the secondary side. Of course closing off the downstream ball valve isn't going to stop the overpressure vent from blowing. The secondary is still pressurized.



See the brass screw head that takes a flat bladed screwdriver? It's the one with a silver locknut on it right at the tip of the round red cover in the middle of the regulator?. Turn that clockwise making sure the locknut doesn't prevent you from doing so.
 

JesseRC

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You keep saying "close the valve" but most setups will have a hose off of each regulator and ALSO a on/off valve right before going to each keg. Have you turn the regulator screw clockwise? If your regulator adjustment screw is all the way backed out, it will send high pressure to the secondary side. Of course closing off the downstream ball valve isn't going to stop the overpressure vent from blowing. The secondary is still pressurized.

I thought clockwise increased pressure?
 
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WhyTee

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Sorry for the confusion. Here's a link to what I have: Link

So it's two regulators. By closing the valve I did mean that I was turning the screw on the regulator to off.

Thanks again.
 

SpanishCastleAle

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From your description it does seem that the second regulator failed. You'll need to verify exactly where the leak is to be sure. When you get a chance...fire it all back up and locate exactly where the leak is.

But using the right terminology will help.
Valve - there is a valve at the top of the CO2 tank...there may be small valves on each regulator outlet (I can't tell from that pic). These are pretty much ON or OFF (open or closed)...although you can do some throttling with them.
Regulator - there are two regulators in that rig you posted a link to. They control the pressure. Use valves to shut off/open flow...use the regulator to adjust the pressure.
Relief Valve - these are the 'release valves'. Each regulator has one and it's purpose is to protect things on the outlet side of the regulator...such as those low-side gages. The kegs should have a relief valve in the lid...most have a tab so you can lift it and open the relief valve but not all do.

Since the regs are in parallel...if one fails the whole system is unuseable until you either repair/replace it...or remove it from the system and move the high-side gage (to plug the hole you just created). If you mess with this be sure to be safe (i.e. always close tank valve and bleed the pressure down before disconnecting anything) and IIRC the high-side gage often has left-hand threads.
 
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WhyTee

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Thanks for the info castle. The "leak" is coming from the relief valve located next to the regulator in question. There are no valves on the regulator outlets, I was using valve and regulator interchangeably so sorry for that confusion. I'll certainly give it another whirl when I get home like you said to be certain, then it looks like I'll be removing that regulator so I can have at least one beer carb'd for the weekend.

There shouldn't be any problems connecting a new, better, regulator to the same set up?

From your description it does seem that the second regulator failed. You'll need to verify exactly where the leak is to be sure. When you get a chance...fire it all back up and locate exactly where the leak is.

But using the right terminology will help.
Valve - there is a valve at the top of the CO2 tank...there may be small valves on each regulator outlet (I can't tell from that pic). These are pretty much ON or OFF (open or closed)...although you can do some throttling with them.
Regulator - there are two regulators in that rig you posted a link to. They control the pressure. Use valves to shut off/open flow...use the regulator to adjust the pressure.
Relief Valve - these are the 'release valves'. Each regulator has one and it's purpose is to protect things on the outlet side of the regulator...such as those low-side gages. The kegs should have a relief valve in the lid...most have a tab so you can lift it and open the relief valve but not all do.

Since the regs are in parallel...if one fails the whole system is unuseable until you either repair/replace it...or remove it from the system and move the high-side gage (to plug the hole you just created). If you mess with this be sure to be safe (i.e. always close tank valve and bleed the pressure down before disconnecting anything) and IIRC the high-side gage often has left-hand threads.
 

JesseRC

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before you open the tank valve I would turn the adjusting screw on each regulator counter clockwise(reducing pressure). If you have one of them completely turned clockwise, that might have blown the relief valve. Not sure.
 

kirscp

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My guess is you are turning the screw clockwise and you have maxed the pressure yourself. You need to turn the screw COUNTER CLOCKWISE, or UNSCREWING the screw. Screwing the screw all the way in sets the regulator at maximum pressure, not shutting it off.

You will need to turn off the tank. Shut off your shut off valves. I'd turn the screw all the way out and screw back in a couple of turns. Release pressure from all the kegs and lines. Turn tank back on and see what the pressure is at on the gauge. Adjust from there.
 
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WhyTee

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My guess is you are turning the screw clockwise and you have maxed the pressure yourself. You need to turn the screw COUNTER CLOCKWISE, or UNSCREWING the screw. Screwing the screw all the way in sets the regulator at maximum pressure, not shutting it off.

You will need to turn off the tank. Shut off your shut off valves. I'd turn the screw all the way out and screw back in a couple of turns. Release pressure from all the kegs and lines. Turn tank back on and see what the pressure is at on the gauge. Adjust from there.
I'll double check, but last night it was set at 15psi, and before I went to bed I went and checked to make sure there were no leaks from the keg lids and the psi was still at 15, wake up this morning and the needle is buried past 60psi with the relief valve hissing. I tried turning the regulator knob all the way counter clockwise and it was still past 60psi after I bled some gas from the keg.

Then again, it was this morning and right after I woke up so hopefully it was just user error :D
 
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WhyTee

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Wanted to thank everyone for their responses. I went home last night, disconnected everything took the CO2 set up out of the fridge and turned it on without changing anything and suddenly it was working. So I reconnected to the kegs and still no problems, checked every couple hours no issue. Woke up this morning and no issue. I'm still not sure what the problem was/is but it appears to have subsided for now. Thanks again. :mug:
 

schristian619

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Be carefull abou it happening again though. I have the same set up from midwest (in fact I had a feeling from the begining it was this system), and had the same issues with one of teh regulators. Unfortunatley for me, it didn't start until 6-8 months after buying so I couldn't return it. There is something wrong with some of their regulators, if you do a search you will see many more people with the same issue. They are, however, very good about exchanging if you catch it soon enough. I bought a new regulator and use that, never happened again. I would call them and talk to someone there about it, they should swap it out for you, at least that's what I've heard.
 

the_Roqk

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I'm wondering if your regulator diaphragm had gotten stuck from being in the cold fridge/ keggerator. Not sure of your posts in this thread of when and if you stated that your co2 bottle and reg were in the fridge/keggerator.


Just my .02 worth
 
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