Clawhammer Supply BIAB

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Seafoxskipper

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Let me preface this with I am just beginning to research home brewing and plan on building my brew area this winter. I have never brewed before and I am looking at this system to all grain brew in a limited space because a tiered system would not work for me. I was hoping to get some opinions on this system before I drop this kind of money. I am not a big fan of the Robo Brew or the Grainfather from my initial comparison, but again what the hell do I know!

https://www.clawhammersupply.com/collections/all-products/products/2-5-gallon-digital-brewing-system

Thank you in advance!
 

TANSTAAFB

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It looks like you're getting quite a bit of bang for your buck! They look like they have paid attention to detail and built some nice features into the system. That said, that kettle looked like a 6 gallon not a 10 gallon and from my experience, even the 10 will become too small very quickly. I'd go with a minimum of 15 gallon and I think my 20 gallon kettle is perfect. No worrying about boil overs and I can do 10-12 gallon batches or high gravity beers when I want to. Do you have to stick with 120v or could you step up to 240v? That's going to be a limiting factor.

For comparison here's a few others with a quick search of the Googles
http://www.highgravitybrew.com/stor...lectric-Wort-Hog-5-Gallon-BIAB-120V-p4647.htm

And

http://www.brew-boss.com/product-p/bb120120-value10-biab.htm

And

https://brausupply.com/collections/brew-systems/products/unibrau-all-in-one-electric-brew-system-v-3
 
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Seafoxskipper

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Unfortunately I am limited to 120v. I do believe that the photo of the product (regarding the pot) has a 5 gallon pot vs a 10 gallon. The description states a 10 gallon pot. They said it takes approximately 45 min from strike temp to boil or a few beers! Thank you for your reply I will look into these other systems for comparison.
 

Jawbox0

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One warning flag I saw is that the element didn't look to be ultra low density. I'd be very concerned about scorching. It wouldn't be difficult to swap out though I'd think.
 

enormous13

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The Clawhammer Supply system is a decent kit. I was looking into it as well, since I was looking for a system to do batches anywhere from like 2-5 gallons, where I'd mostly make 2.5 gallons batches. I'm also strapped for space and need a single vessel type system. It sounds like you're interested in about the same and limited to 120v.

The one thing that bothers me, is that for $850, most of the kit comes completely unassembled, minus the controller. You have to wire the element, connect all the hardware, connect all the ports, cut the tubing, so on and so on. This stuff isn't super difficult, but in all honesty, it's not that far from DIY'ing a system. I just think at their price point, the thing should come completely pre-assembled and ready to go out of the box.

If you're the DIY kind of person, I can definitely tell you that you could make the same "type" of system (recirculating eBIABasket) for much less. I'm doing that exact thing now. If you figure the major components and prices:
8 gallon pot: $30-$150
Controller: $100-$300
Pump: $20-$100
Basket: $100-$150
Hop Spider: $40
Hardware/Connections: $100
Chiller: $20-$150
If you're smart where you spend your money, you could come in closer to $600, or you could upgrade every component to the best of the best and be way over their $850 sales price. Just FYI.
 

TexasWine

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Let me preface this with I am just beginning to research home brewing and plan on building my brew area this winter. I have never brewed before and I am looking at this system to all grain brew in a limited space because a tiered system would not work for me. I was hoping to get some opinions on this system before I drop this kind of money. I am not a big fan of the Robo Brew or the Grainfather from my initial comparison, but again what the hell do I know!

https://www.clawhammersupply.com/collections/all-products/products/2-5-gallon-digital-brewing-system

Thank you in advance!
Quick question. What is "limited space" for you? Kitchen, spare bedroom, other? I ask because my single tier two-vessel system has a minimal footprint and I'd recommend the configuration. It sits on an old baker's rack that I put casters on.

I'm a 120v brewer too, running two elements on two circuits. If you want more details about my system just let me know.

You can, with minimal diy'ness, build a system and save money.

FWIW, I have used Brausupply stuff for years and have been extremely happy. Still have their controller I use every single brew day.
 

TANSTAAFB

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Quick question. What is "limited space" for you? Kitchen, spare bedroom, other? I ask because my single tier two-vessel system has a minimal footprint and I'd recommend the configuration. It sits on an old baker's rack that I put casters on.

I'm a 120v brewer too, running two elements on two circuits. If you want more details about my system just let me know.

You can, with minimal diy'ness, build a system and save money.

FWIW, I have used Brausupply stuff for years and have been extremely happy. Still have their controller I use every single brew day.
Do you have a link to your setup? I'd be interested as well. I currently have a 240v induction cooktop and a 120v bucket heater to supplement which works great in my basement but obviously can't be used anywhere that doesn't have a 240v supply. BTW, the Harbor Freight cart works beautifully for an eBIAB setup!
20171030_134120.jpg
20171101_155918.jpg
20171101_155858.jpg
 
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Seafoxskipper

Seafoxskipper

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Well
Quick question. What is "limited space" for you? Kitchen, spare bedroom, other? I ask because my single tier two-vessel system has a minimal footprint and I'd recommend the configuration. It sits on an old baker's rack that I put casters on.

I'm a 120v brewer too, running two elements on two circuits. If you want more details about my system just let me know.

You can, with minimal diy'ness, build a system and save money.

FWIW, I have used Brausupply stuff for years and have been extremely happy. Still have their controller I use every single brew day.
I am also building a brew bench, a 7 cubic foot keezer and a 5 cubic foot fermenting chamber. I only have about eight feet to work with and I want the bench to be dual purpose so a single vessel is preferred for my application. Yes I could build my own and I do agree the Claw should be pre-assembled for that price point but I will have no problem in DYI. I prefer the tubing not be cut as I am not sure of my lengths quite yet.
 

TexasWine

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Here's a pic of my set up, no hoses attached, but you get the picture [emoji3] It's about 36" wide, 16" deep, and maybe 66" tall with the casters. I roll it around to wherever I want to brew, which is always in the garage.

One 15.5 and one 16 gallon kettle, two pumps, one exchanger.

I run it in a counterflow HERMs for most normal sized batches, using the the external heat exchanger for mash temp control as opposed to a better mounted coil. I can also do single vessel or K-RIMS/Brutus, which I use for larger batches.

Yesterday I put together a price list for all the parts and pieces that would go into building this system. Minus the baker's rack, it's in the neighborhood of $1k.

This price is assuming you buy a pre built controller and the only holes you need to poke in your vessels are for the return lines, which is one per. Up high for the MT, down low for the BK/HLT. The most involved DIY part is drilling these holes, and it really is dead simple with a step bit or even easier with knockout punch.

Understand you want to go single vessel. I started with the same thing, stove top even. Then about 18 months ago I started doing some reading and realized a multi vessel approach was the only way I was going to be able to incorporate some much needed process changes, like underleting the mash and getting crystal clear wort to the BK. My approach to brewing is not for everyone, but I encourage you to read some of the professional brewing texts and keep some of their best practices in mind when deciding what to do. Clear wort matters, as well as hot side oxygen exposure.

Hope some of my ramblings help, or at least put you to sleep [emoji3] which is just as beneficial.
IMG_20171108_175530.jpg
 

mj1angier

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Do you have a link to your setup? I'd be interested as well. I currently have a 240v induction cooktop and a 120v bucket heater to supplement which works great in my basement but obviously can't be used anywhere that doesn't have a 240v supply. BTW, the Harbor Freight cart works beautifully for an eBIAB setup! View attachment 546641View attachment 546642View attachment 546643
LoL, I have the same cart, just did not mount the drawer on it. I wanted more space under the bottom. Here is a photo with wood backing and shelves when I was testing it out. Working to change everything to metal or plastic.
beer cart.jpg
 

TANSTAAFB

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Here's a pic of my set up, no hoses attached, but you get the picture [emoji3] It's about 36" wide, 16" deep, and maybe 66" tall with the casters. I roll it around to wherever I want to brew, which is always in the garage.

One 15.5 and one 16 gallon kettle, two pumps, one exchanger.

I run it in a counterflow HERMs for most normal sized batches, using the the external heat exchanger for mash temp control as opposed to a better mounted coil. I can also do single vessel or K-RIMS/Brutus, which I use for larger batches.

Yesterday I put together a price list for all the parts and pieces that would go into building this system. Minus the baker's rack, it's in the neighborhood of $1k.

This price is assuming you buy a pre built controller and the only holes you need to poke in your vessels are for the return lines, which is one per. Up high for the MT, down low for the BK/HLT. The most involved DIY part is drilling these holes, and it really is dead simple with a step bit or even easier with knockout punch.

Understand you want to go single vessel. I started with the same thing, stove top even. Then about 18 months ago I started doing some reading and realized a multi vessel approach was the only way I was going to be able to incorporate some much needed process changes, like underleting the mash and getting crystal clear wort to the BK. My approach to brewing is not for everyone, but I encourage you to read some of the professional brewing texts and keep some of their best practices in mind when deciding what to do. Clear wort matters, as well as hot side oxygen exposure.

Hope some of my ramblings help, or at least put you to sleep [emoji3] which is just as beneficial.View attachment 546656
I underlet my mash every time I lower my bag into the strike water. Just sayin [emoji16][emoji482]
 
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Seafoxskipper

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Lol, talk through it. What are you hung up on? My issues were price, simplicity, features, & reliability.
There are just so many ways to go and I want to do it right the first time. I have decided to focus on the Keezer and fermentation chamber builds first. Starting with a 7 cubic chest freezer and my first issue is a collar hinge or a lid hinge or both? I have the materials for that part of the build (I think)- 2x6 pine, 1x10 oak, 4- 3 inch castors, sealants, adhesives, stain and poly. I think I want to add rigid insulation board on the inside with aluminum tape. From there I need to decide on whether or not I go with intertap or perlick faucets (I really like intertap). I think I can get away with 4 inch shanks from my calculations for the thickness of my collar. I think I want to have a top to the collar (not a tower). I will go with the Ink Bird for sure and I have the fan on the way to recirc the air. Now onto the CO2 distribution issue. I am told that taprite makes a great system that I can daisy chain so I can run different pressures vs just a one pressure fits all distribution bar. I want to have four outlets so I can have the fourth line available to pressurize kegs (I think). Do I want to go ahead and have a nitro setup for Stouts? Do I really need a nitro set up if I have four Taprite regulators? I am aware of tubing, swivel nuts and length issues so I plan on starting with 10ft on each keg (3) and will shorten as needed. I have a line on pin lock 3 gallon kegs vs 5 gallon, I kinda like that aspect so I can split my brew with brew buddies. Fermentation chamber I think will be just a small 5 cubic foot chest freezer with an Inkbird and a Ss Brew Bucket. I have a line on the Ss Brew Bucket as well (same guy that has the kegs). I have read some good reviews on the Ss line. There is more but this is what I have decided to focus on now (a lot lol) On a positive note I am collecting some nice new tools during this process! Got my eye on a Kreg Pocket Jig next!
 

TANSTAAFB

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Ok, looks like you've shifted your focus from your brew setup to temp control fermentation and kegging system. I'm actually in the process of building my keezer myself so I'm very interested in what you come up with. I like the Intertap faucets as well and plan on going that route with 4" shanks, all stainless. I also plan on building a collar and insulating w/ foam board. I have everything to build a STC-1000 controller so I'll probably use that instead of my Johnson controller or buying an Inkbird, but sounds like you've done a ton of research and are good to go. Just remember, you don't have to do it all at once. If you want to add nitro later you can. It's good to plan for the space up front though. I already have a regulator and a small manifold so I'll add a tapright secondary like this
https://www.homebrewsupply.com/single-gauge-secondary-regulator.html
so I can either carbonate or serve at a different temp. This also gives me the option of adding on down the road. The only thing to think about with a keezer style fermentation chamber is having to lift the fermenter in and out.

Have you decided how you're going to brew the wonderful beer your going to ferment and serve in your awesome new keezers?! [emoji16][emoji482]
 
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Seafoxskipper

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Ok, looks like you've shifted your focus from your brew setup to temp control fermentation and kegging system. I'm actually in the process of building my keezer myself so I'm very interested in what you come up with. I like the Intertap faucets as well and plan on going that route with 4" shanks, all stainless. I also plan on building a collar and insulating w/ foam board. I have everything to build a STC-1000 controller so I'll probably use that instead of my Johnson controller or buying an Inkbird, but sounds like you've done a ton of research and are good to go. Just remember, you don't have to do it all at once. If you want to add nitro later you can. It's good to plan for the space up front though. I already have a regulator and a small manifold so I'll add a tapright secondary like this
https://www.homebrewsupply.com/single-gauge-secondary-regulator.html
so I can either carbonate or serve at a different temp. This also gives me the option of adding on down the road. The only thing to think about with a keezer style fermentation chamber is having to lift the fermenter in and out.

Have you decided how you're going to brew the wonderful beer your going to ferment and serve in your awesome new keezers?! [emoji16][emoji482]
Well it just got to be overwhelming regarding brewing options and I realized I needed to have a place to put the brew before I could start brewing so I might as well get that done first. I am still leaning towards the Clawhammer system but its not carved in stone at this time. Since these builds will take a bit of time it affords me more research time down the road. I still have the brew bench and mini crane lift to build as well.
 

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After 3 years of extract brewing, I'm finally going to be making the jump to AG, and have been researching Turnkey Electric BIAB systems for quite some time. Currently, I'm 90% sold on the Clawhammer system. My only holdup on it is the 120V element. I'm fortunate enough to have 220/240v access in my brew room, and everyone I spoke to on it say to definitely go full the 240v; as you'll find 120v just isn't enough juice. Aside from that, the system fits my needs perfect; as I never plan on brewing over 5 Gallon Batches; or doing massive high gravity beers.

I reached out to Clawhammer about a possible 240v upgraded heating element and they quickly responded they are in the testing and planning stage of one, and hope to have it in production within a few months! For now, I'm going to hold off on dropping the $850.00 until the 240v system is out. They did mention the upgraded 240V element would be available as a standalone upgrade for current Clawhammer owners... but of course, the panel would need to be upgraded as well.

My LHBS is strongly pushing me towards a grainfather... but I like to tinker, and want something that's a little more controllable, and possibly upgradable in the future... Instead of just pushing a button. Three other systems I'm considering are the Unibrau which looks killer, but again only 120V, and $1,150.00. The brew-boss, but I really don't care for the software interface and process to adjusting temps. And the High Gravity system which seems like a great system, but can get to be pretty pricey with options, plus I don't think a chiller is included either?

At the end of the day, I'm probably going to be pulling the trigger on the Clawhammer system. With it being so new to the market, if any current owners could chime on feedback and how they like their systems, that be awesome!

Cheers!
 

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I also really like the clawhammer system but have also hesitated due to the 120v... thanks for the heads up about the 240v being in the works. I'm going to hold out and wait to see if they come through with it.
 
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Seafoxskipper

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After 3 years of extract brewing, I'm finally going to be making the jump to AG, and have been researching Turnkey Electric BIAB systems for quite some time. Currently, I'm 90% sold on the Clawhammer system. My only holdup on it is the 120V element. I'm fortunate enough to have 220/240v access in my brew room, and everyone I spoke to on it say to definitely go full the 240v; as you'll find 120v just isn't enough juice. Aside from that, the system fits my needs perfect; as I never plan on brewing over 5 Gallon Batches; or doing massive high gravity beers.

I reached out to Clawhammer about a possible 240v upgraded heating element and they quickly responded they are in the testing and planning stage of one, and hope to have it in production within a few months! For now, I'm going to hold off on dropping the $850.00 until the 240v system is out. They did mention the upgraded 240V element would be available as a standalone upgrade for current Clawhammer owners... but of course, the panel would need to be upgraded as well.

My LHBS is strongly pushing me towards a grainfather... but I like to tinker, and want something that's a little more controllable, and possibly upgradable in the future... Instead of just pushing a button. Three other systems I'm considering are the Unibrau which looks killer, but again only 120V, and $1,150.00. The brew-boss, but I really don't care for the software interface and process to adjusting temps. And the High Gravity system which seems like a great system, but can get to be pretty pricey with options, plus I don't think a chiller is included either?

At the end of the day, I'm probably going to be pulling the trigger on the Clawhammer system. With it being so new to the market, if any current owners could chime on feedback and how they like their systems, that be awesome!

Cheers!
Good news! I talked to them about the 120v system and how long it takes to get to a boil and they said about 30 to 45 min. Being new to brewing I do not know how long a 220v element would take in comparison. Having reviewed all the single electric vessel systems out there my opinion is none thus far really compare for the reasons I think are important. One of my main issues is "all-in-one" contained systems are enclosed and that gives me pause if say something like a pump fails or gets clogged. There is some major disassembly required to access the components. I like that I can change up the Clawhammer system as the components are all separate and off the shelf items. I am still a month or so out before I am actually ready to brew so we will see what they come up with. Hopefully the price point doesn't jump through the roof like the others.
 

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Good news! I talked to them about the 120v system and how long it takes to get to a boil and they said about 30 to 45 min. Being new to brewing I do not know how long a 220v element would take in comparison. Having reviewed all the single electric vessel systems out there my opinion is none thus far really compare for the reasons I think are important. One of my main issues is "all-in-one" contained systems are enclosed and that gives me pause if say something like a pump fails or gets clogged. There is some major disassembly required to access the components. I like that I can change up the Clawhammer system as the components are all separate and off the shelf items. I am still a month or so out before I am actually ready to brew so we will see what they come up with. Hopefully the price point doesn't jump through the roof like the others.
Paralysis by Analysis for sure, I'm the same way. I want to do it right the first time, especially when there's so much good info out there to learn from.

I think they mentioned that their price for the 240v system would go up about $300 from the base 120v. I can't find where I heard/read that though to link it, but that's about average for the voltage jump on a system.

As for the time difference in reaching boil temps, here's a helpful little set of calculators http://manskirtbrewing.com/calculators.aspx

Just fill in the blanks for the "electric heating element calculations" and you can compare the two voltages based on your volumes and such. From my experience with 120v, that 30-45 minute prediction they gave you is a little gracious on their part for a 5 gallon batch, maybe for a 2.5-3 gallon batch.
 
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Seafoxskipper

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Paralysis by Analysis for sure, I'm the same way. I want to do it right the first time, especially when there's so much good info out there to learn from.

I think they mentioned that their price for the 240v system would go up about $300 from the base 120v. I can't find where I heard/read that though to link it, but that's about average for the voltage jump on a system.

As for the time difference in reaching boil temps, here's a helpful little set of calculators http://manskirtbrewing.com/calculators.aspx

Just fill in the blanks for the "electric heating element calculations" and you can compare the two voltages based on your volumes and such. From my experience with 120v, that 30-45 minute prediction they gave you is a little gracious on their part for a 5 gallon batch, maybe for a 2.5-3 gallon batch.
Thank you for the link to the calc! Seems like it would be closer to 100 min. That is several beers before boil, could be dangerous and irresponsible lol.
 

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Good news! I talked to them about the 120v system and how long it takes to get to a boil and they said about 30 to 45 min. Being new to brewing I do not know how long a 220v element would take in comparison. Having reviewed all the single electric vessel systems out there my opinion is none thus far really compare for the reasons I think are important. One of my main issues is "all-in-one" contained systems are enclosed and that gives me pause if say something like a pump fails or gets clogged. There is some major disassembly required to access the components. I like that I can change up the Clawhammer system as the components are all separate and off the shelf items. I am still a month or so out before I am actually ready to brew so we will see what they come up with. Hopefully the price point doesn't jump through the roof like the others.
Couldn't agree more on the ease of individual component maintenance & replacements compared to the Grainfather all in one single vessel.

As for pricing on the 240v system, On my last email correspondence with them, I asked on that exact same question. They were very coy about it and simply responded " We have a prototype. It is going to the electrical engineering firm that we use to stress test etc.
Once they are finished we will make any necessary changes - do another prototype if needed and go back for re-testing or into production. I would guess it would be about 3-4 months or so until we have a production ready 220/240 controller." My guess is that enormous13 has it spot on... $300.00 increase
 

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I too have been looking at Clawhammer's system as I also do not have access to 240V. From what I've deduced, it is a great system for the money. They give you lots of extras that you don't get from the more expensive High Gravity Wort Hog system (Basket, chiller...). However, I figured out after putting together a list from Brewhardware that I can build the same system for quite a bit less. Now I'm wondering if they would sell their system without their controller and you could just run it with the newish Inkbird IPB-16? My guess is that the controller itself is probably a good 200-300 of the price of their system.
 

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I too have been looking at Clawhammer's system as I also do not have access to 240V. From what I've deduced, it is a great system for the money. They give you lots of extras that you don't get from the more expensive High Gravity Wort Hog system (Basket, chiller...). However, I figured out after putting together a list from Brewhardware that I can build the same system for quite a bit less. Now I'm wondering if they would sell their system without their controller and you could just run it with the newish Inkbird IPB-16? My guess is that the controller itself is probably a good 200-300 of the price of their system.
As long as you keep the amperage under 15A for everything, you could run the Inkbird. They sell the controller a la carte for $499, so if they were to sell the kit minus the controller it could be quite a savings, or their pricing is just really out of whack.

Their 1650w element is going to pull 13.75A at full power, so depending on what pump you use, you're going to be very close to that 15A limit.
 

TexasWine

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Couple of thoughts on the recent discussion around 120v. I'm a 120v brewer, but use two elements during ramping and heading. I've easily boiled 7.5 gallons of wort with a single 1650 watt element, so don't be concerned with that.

Secondly, even though Clawhammer explicitly says the element is ulwd, I gotta say it doesn't look like it. It's awfully short and stubby. I'd want to know the exactly dimensions and wattage density of this element before purchasing.
 

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Couple of thoughts on the recent discussion around 120v. I'm a 120v brewer, but use two elements during ramping and heading. I've easily boiled 7.5 gallons of wort with a single 1650 watt element, so don't be concerned with that.

Secondly, even though Clawhammer explicitly says the element is ulwd, I gotta say it doesn't look like it. It's awfully short and stubby. I'd want to know the exactly dimensions and wattage density of this element before purchasing.
You can definitely get that much liquid to a boil on one element, I think he was more worried about how long it would take to get there. I personally supplement my 1500w element with my stove top when ramping temps up to save time if needed.

I think that element they use is very similar to the one Bobby sells, and I think I remember someone did the math and it came out to just under 50w/sq. in., which is technically the upper end of ULWD, but it sure isn't as low as the 5500w ripple elements running on 120v at 1375w, coming in at like 13w/sq. in.

Another thing to add with the CH system, they do use the pump to recirculate throughout the mash and boil. That recirculation helps keep the liquid moving over the element constantly and helps contribute to preventing scorching. The user will just have to remember not to fire the element without first making sure the pump is recirc'ing, or else I've heard folks using MWD or HWD elements run into scorching when the wort and proteins settle on/around the element.
 

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I have been looking at the CHS system or awhile now too. I will probably pull the trigger on it very soon. Down the road, I will upgrade to a Bayou Classic 1160 and add another 1650 watt element, wire in another PID, on/off switch and separate power cord running to a separate 20 amp GFCI outlet. I know I could build something similar for cheaper, but for right now, I like the all inclusive nature of this deal. I've been extract brewing for awhile now and want to make the jump to all grain and this seems like a decent option.
 

jkfongus

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I have been looking at the CHS system or awhile now too. I will probably pull the trigger on it very soon. Down the road, I will upgrade to a Bayou Classic 1160 and add another 1650 watt element, wire in another PID, on/off switch and separate power cord running to a separate 20 amp GFCI outlet. I know I could build something similar for cheaper, but for right now, I like the all inclusive nature of this deal. I've been extract brewing for awhile now and want to make the jump to all grain and this seems like a decent option.
I'm actually in a similar boat. Going from extract to all-grain BIAB. I have been looking at this system for a while. I was thinking about supplementing the heating with a HotRod from brewhardware. If you purchase this system, please let us know how you like it.
 

cyclonebeer

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It's a fair value for whats included in a ready to brew package. A few things that I would point out: I'm not crazy about the element - not necessarily because of the watt density, but I'm not certain about the enclosure. The element is the only tri clamp fitting on the system. There are cleaner tri clamp elements on the market that don't use some kind of "pod" enclosure to protect the connections. Not sure if they are available in 110 or not. Worth looking into. Second, I personally prefer a CFC to a plate chiller. I'll probably get ripped on this, but plate chillers clog. I know that a hop basket is included, but I almost always just dump hops into the kettle and let them "free range". You can't do that with a plate chiller. Finally, it looks like the rest of the kettle fittings are threaded. That means taping the threads to avoid potential leaks, and occasionally re-taping threads when you do deep cleaning. Not the end of the world, but a periodic maintenance routine. I would prefer a kettle with all welded ports, and all the same kind of fittings. I personally like tri clamps. But still, it looks like a perfectly fine system to brew with for a long time.
 

Jambro64

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I just built a 240v system and new brew pot and total was $800. Just added the pump and connections which will add about another $170. Using a Mark II pump instead of the 24 volt little ones. My build link is in my signature. I would definitely recommend 240v instead of 120v. I also like my 10 gallon pot but think that maybe should have gone with the 15 gallon but to get all the Tri Clover pieces it would have been way out of my price range. I am happy to do regular 5 gallon batches and will upgrade my boil kettle when I want to upgrade to a HERMs system. So if you don't mind getting your hands dirty, it is pretty simple to DIY it.
 

TexasWine

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I would definitely recommend 240v instead of 120v.
Have you tried brewing on 120v? If not, you should give it a try. I recommend using whatever you have available. I use 120v because that's what I've got access to.

There are pros and cons to each voltage. The oft cited benefit of 240v being a lot faster is really only about 15- 20 minutes difference over an entire brew day if you use two 120v outlets on a typical 7 gallon boil volume. And just this weekend I was boiling 11.5 gallons with 1800 watts of actual measured power (I have those nifty voltage/amperage/wattage meters on each of my elements to measure what they're doing).

120v is cheaper to buy equipment for as well. GFCI protection is easy, you can switch directly without the need for a coil, etc.

For some, 15-20 minutes of time savings is worth it. For me, I'll keep working with what I've got for now, but I'm not completely writing off 240v.
 

Quadrider

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Still no update on the Clawhammer 240v System. I'll probably email Emmet again in a few weeks to see if they are any closer to the final prototype. I have already budgeted about $1,150.00 to purchase the 240V setup, and hopefully it comes in right around that range. Looks like CH added some awesome (and detailed) info on brewing with their 120v setup:

https://www.clawhammersupply.com/bl...g/brewing-5-gallon-batches-with-110-120-volts

Looks like they're stating that in some circumstances, it may be impossible to achieve a full boil unless the kettle is wrapped with an insulator, and the lid is left on during the boil. I've never attempted a covered boil before, but they also added some analytical info on researching this:


Also noticed that they are recommending to leave the pump off during heating to improve heat up times. Based on the FAQ they recently added: "It takes 60 minutes to heat from ground water temp to mash and 45 minutes to heat from mash to boil". In what I've gathered, sounds like standard single element 120V systems heat up 8 Gal. @ 2 degrees per min., whereas 240v systems heat up 8 Gal. @ 4 degrees per min? Does this sound about right?
 

smbdyshero

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I just got off the phone with Emmett. They are currently doing end of year inventory so it will be a little while before the 240v system is released. The 120v version will be available a la carte in the near future so if you don't need a plate chiller, like me, you don't have to buy it. The prices will be comparable to the full kit (i.e. they wont jack up the prices because you are not buying the kit).

I am ordering this a la carte once that option is available, and he said it should be available next week. I will be going by their recommendation to keep the lid on during boil, but I am adding a DIY version of the Brew-Boss Condenser Boss. I'm only going DIY with it because they sell for 150 plus the weldless quick disconnect for about 200 after shipping and I can build it complete for about 100-125. This will give the steam and DMS somewhere to go besides back in the kettle.

Once I get the system up and running I will be posting a follow-up thread with a review and my findings in regards to mash water heating and boil heating times. Also my findings regarding the closed lid condenser method.
 
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Seafoxskipper

Seafoxskipper

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I just got off the phone with Emmett. They are currently doing end of year inventory so it will be a little while before the 240v system is released. The 120v version will be available a la carte in the near future so if you don't need a plate chiller, like me, you don't have to buy it. The prices will be comparable to the full kit (i.e. they wont jack up the prices because you are not buying the kit).

I am ordering this a la carte once that option is available, and he said it should be available next week. I will be going by their recommendation to keep the lid on during boil, but I am adding a DIY version of the Brew-Boss Condenser Boss. I'm only going DIY with it because they sell for 150 plus the weldless quick disconnect for about 200 after shipping and I can build it complete for about 100-125. This will give the steam and DMS somewhere to go besides back in the kettle.

Once I get the system up and running I will be posting a follow-up thread with a review and my findings in regards to mash water heating and boil heating times. Also my findings regarding the closed lid condenser method.
Great information! Thank you!
 

smbdyshero

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Ok I got impatient and ordered the complete kit for 850. Probably going to sell off the plate chiller and possibly the PID control box (not for 499) and use an Inkbird but only time will tell. I plan on adding the condenser and another 1650w element eventually but I will see how it does just right out of the box without doin too much tinkering to it. I'll start a separate thread with complete review.
 

TANSTAAFB

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Ok I got impatient and ordered the complete kit for 850. Probably going to sell off the plate chiller and possibly the PID control box (not for 499) and use an Inkbird but only time will tell. I plan on adding the condenser and another 1650w element eventually but I will see how it does just right out of the box without doin too much tinkering to it. I'll start a separate thread with complete review.
Very cool, please link to it when you do
 
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