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clarifying honey

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Maylar

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I have some local wildflower honey that's crystalized. I understand that it can be de-crystalized by putting the jar in hot water. Anybody have a clue about what temperature and for how long?
 

bernardsmith

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Hi Maylar, I would place the jar in a pan of boiling water and let the heat de-crystalize the honey. The thermal mass of the honey will be large enough to allow the boiling water to slowly raise the temperature of the honey . If you can I would immerse the whole jar (or bucket) of honey rather than just an inch or two. It may take a while for the crystals to all break up but if you keep your eye on this - returning to the pot every 10-15 minutes you won't allow the honey to overheat or the water to boil off.
 

ilium

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Try to keep the honey under 110 degrees F to avoid destroying the enzymes and anti-oxidants.

I put my crystallized honey in a crock pot filled with tap water, and set the crock pot to the lowest setting which is "warm". It may take 5 to 6 hours or longer for the honey to return to a liquid form.

Note: I store my honey in 1/2 gallon glass mason jars. I have never used this method on honey stored in plastic containers but it should work fine with plastic.
 

Tobor_8thMan

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This is a valid question and I'm glad to read the replies as they are most helpful. We've all probably run into crystalized honey.

However, what is the honey container? Glass? Plastic?

I ask as I've done as described in the prior posts to "reactive" honey and the plastic container somewhat melted. Got me wondering about the chemicals leaching into the honey since the state of the plastic was changed.

Am I worrying about nothing?

Input?
 
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Maylar

Maylar

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FWIW, there is a label on the local wildfire honey I have that says if it's crystalized heat a pot of water to 150 F and drop the bottle into that. Plastic bottles. My tap water is 125, and a few changes of water in the pot did the trick.
 
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