Chimay Tripel Clone - first fermentation

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Mingle

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How do I know when to transfer my Chimay Tripel clone into the carboy for second fermentation? It's been 4 days & it's extremely active at 80 degrees F. Also, what's good recomended temps & time periods for second ferment & bottling?
 

spiffcow

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Wait until it stops foaming and the yeast settles to the bottom before transferring to the secondary. As for temperature, it depends on the yeast, but unless you're using Saison yeast, 80 *F is probably too high. I've never made a tripel before, but from what I understand, you should let it sit in the secondary for quite a while (a couple months or so).
 
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Mingle

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Thanks! I was told once the monks ferment tripels between 80-90 degrees F. Any experts on tripels out there?
 

permo

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80 is far to0 high.........90 would be assanine


you should typically start fermentation of a belgian tripel in the mid to upper sixties for the first 3-4 days, and then once things start to slow you bring it up to the mid seventies........you are going to get seriously, maybe even borderline undrinkable, banana/ester/clove...........

cool it down man!!
 

PhelanKA7

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I also recommend 60-65 degrees if possible as others suggested. I fermented mine at about 60 degrees and it turned out really well. At 80 degrees I think that all those sugars in a Tripel especially become less easily digested by the yeast. Cool it to 70 at least if you can.
 
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Mingle

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Thanks. The guy who told me 80-90 has owned a home brew store for 25 yrs. He put the ingred together for me, I'll post the recipe soon.
 

MeatyPortion

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80 is far to0 high.........90 would be assanine


you should typically start fermentation of a belgian tripel in the mid to upper sixties for the first 3-4 days, and then once things start to slow you bring it up to the mid seventies........you are going to get seriously, maybe even borderline undrinkable, banana/ester/clove...........

cool it down man!!
plus juan

An IPA I made fermented at around 80 (had no fermentation box) and there were banana flavors everywhere.
 

Bacchus

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Thanks! I was told once the monks ferment tripels between 80-90 degrees F. Any experts on tripels out there?
I'm no expert but also keep in mind that the monks that make Chimay primary for three days, secondary for three days, bottle condition for three weeks and then it goes to market!!! I don't think you'll need to leave it in the secondary for months.
 

Bacchus

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I was actually under the impression that Chimay was aged for 18 months before hitting the market
I always thought so too! Especially considering what a top-end ale it is!! But I recently watched a documentary about the Cistercian monks that brew Chimay and the brewmaster said that they primary for three days, secondary (brighten) for three days and bottle condition for three weeks. They have it at the point of sale in under thirty days. The only exception is the Tripel (blue label). They primary four days and secondary four days for that one.

Kind of makes you wonder about the whole "aging beer" argument, doesn't it? LOL!!!
 

keuma2

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I agree with Permo. Start in the upper sixties and rise after a few days. Temps up around 80 are best left for heavy Abbeys or sours using Roesalare or similar yeast.
 
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