Chicken flavored Beer

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madscientist451

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Having morning coffee and surfing the internet, I came across this:


15. Cock ale

15s-Medieval_wine_conservation.jpg

Peter Isotalo
We’ve already introduced you to the delights of stuffed sheep’s penis, but cock ale is not another genitalia-based dish. In fact, as the name suggests, it’s a drink. Basically, take some standard Middle Ages ale, and add a parboiled male chicken to it. Oh, and don’t forget to skin and gut the bird first. You can also add spices and fruit to taste. So, in essence, it’s chicken-flavored beer.

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I've never heard of it, but it turns out there is quite a bit of information out there including HBT back in 2012, and a recipe in the Joy of Homebrewing.
Fortified wine (sack), raisins, dates, mace and nutmeg were added in addition to boiled chicken. I'm not sure if the chicken is supposed to be boiled in the ale or separately.
One link from the HBT thread says to use baked chicken, and supposedly it came out pretty good.
Anyone else try using chicken in beer? Maybe it would be better to leave out the chicken and just use the spices, raisins, dates and wine?



 
OP
OP
madscientist451

madscientist451

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So instead of actual chicken I found chicken flavor concentrate.....

Since its actually called "cock beer" I suppose I should go on google and look up cock flavor....
:yes:
A cock is a male chicken in case you are offended or wondering what this is about,
You know, maybe this will be the next big thing when hazy IPA's get worn out?
 

monkeymath

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I think it is sufficient testament to the quality of beer in the middle ages if adding boiled chicken was considered a valuable, and probably quite luxurious, addition.

...

Now, the German inside me wants to add something along the lines of "... and the same goes for contemporary American habanero-peanut-butter stouts", but eh, whatever.
 

Rish

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Having morning coffee and surfing the internet, I came across this:


15. Cock ale

15s-Medieval_wine_conservation.jpg

Peter Isotalo
We’ve already introduced you to the delights of stuffed sheep’s penis, but cock ale is not another genitalia-based dish. In fact, as the name suggests, it’s a drink. Basically, take some standard Middle Ages ale, and add a parboiled male chicken to it. Oh, and don’t forget to skin and gut the bird first. You can also add spices and fruit to taste. So, in essence, it’s chicken-flavored beer.

Original source:

I've never heard of it, but it turns out there is quite a bit of information out there including HBT back in 2012, and a recipe in the Joy of Homebrewing.
Fortified wine (sack), raisins, dates, mace and nutmeg were added in addition to boiled chicken. I'm not sure if the chicken is supposed to be boiled in the ale or separately.
One link from the HBT thread says to use baked chicken, and supposedly it came out pretty good.
Anyone else try using chicken in beer? Maybe it would be better to leave out the chicken and just use the spices, raisins, dates and wine?



Can't see where it says how big the cock should be?
 

Grainpaw

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The people of the Middle Ages were not lunatics just because you don't understand them. The meat may have contributed yeast nutrients as well as flavor.
I made versions of this several times around 25-30 years ago. There is no shortcut to getting this result. It is not chicken flavored, but has a unique wholesome aspect. I'd use it as a winter sipping beer, or in case of illness. It could be made with a whole chicken, but I leaned toward leftover chicken or turkey carcasses, and once, the spine and upper leg bones of a small deer, which an acquaintance hung in my apple tree, dressed and trimmed off some, fried and ate a bit, and never came back for the rest.
After several months in the cellar, the bottles developed a tiny ring of fat in the neck at the surface, where whatever fat left in solution rose to the top.
I would not hesitate to make this again if I had the time and space, but things change when you move and get married.
This is where the recipe stood after I had done it a few times, and the deer beer.

#407 Dec. 12, 1996 5 gal. O.G.=1.057, plus wine and rum
Old Wishbone Avian Ale / The Ghost of Thanksgiving Past
Simmer turkey carcass ~ 6 hours with bay, cinnamon, rosemary
Day 1, In large bowl, marinate with
~1.5 liters 1994 Dandelion Mead (another time I used Thunderbird)
3/4 Cup Montego Bay Light Rum
14 oz, raisins,1 tsp Nutmeg, 2 tsp. Ginger, 1 tsp. Cinnamon,1 tsp. Cloves, 2 tsp. Mace

Day 2, 12/13/96, Mash 122F 1/2 hr. eventually to 158F:
10 lbs. Briess 2-row malt
3/4 lb. Crystal malt 64L
1/4 lb. Dextrine malt 1.5L
1 tsp. Gypsum

Day 3 12/14/96 Boil
1 oz old homegrown Eroica at 10 min.
26 gm " " at 35 min.
11 gm Fuggles pellets 4.5% at 109 min.
end boil at 120 minutes, fan cool , pack of Danstar Nottingham yeast.

12/24/96
Rack to another primary, add liquids from marinade, SG=1.022

1/13/97
Rack to carboy, SG = 1.020 Add 1/4 C corn sugar

1/24/97 FG=1.019
Prime with 5/4 Cup Wheat DME
Add some Nottingham culture from a jar

1/26/97 Bottled

Looking at this again, I don't remember why I mashed 2 hours, waited until the next day to boil, or waited 2 days between priming and bottling. Maybe my work schedule was hectic and I had limited time per day, or something or other came up. However, this worked, and it was a good and memorable beer.
Ambient temperature in my brew kitchen at the back of a drafty old house in the winter was probably about 60 degrees F. Cellar mid-40s, maybe up to 75 in the summer.
 

Grainpaw

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Bash open the simmered bones with a sanitized ball peen hammer or whatever to expose the marrow before adding to the marinade.
You could make a stew with the simmering broth, but my attempt to make anything tasty from the marinade solids failed. But, I'm not much of a cook.
 

bwible

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What - no chicken?? Or even blue crabs? Sheesh!
I just got some crab meat (we’re on the Maryland border of PA) thinking we want to make some crab bisque. Reading recipes, they all start with a roux. No surprise. Then I got to thinking how roux makes me think of NEIPA. Crab bisque NEIPA? Then we’re back to:
 

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