Chestnut beer

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Hii, I would like to make a beer with chestnut instead of barley.
Does anyone have experience with this?

I do not talk about a beer with 60% barley to be clear.
I'm really talking about 0% barley or other fermentable material except for chestnut.
My plan was to malt the chestnut with water in order to form amylase.


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Check out this link. Looks like it can be done. Never done it and can't offer any advice but this talks about it a little bit. Hope it helps.

Gluten-Free Chestnut Beer
I'll check it out, thanks for the link, it's appreciated!

(Edit)
I see however that they use added enzymes.
I was hoping the chestnuts themselves would leave enzymes by mouting them.
 
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It sounds like they're not as fermentable as barley which is the problem and why enzymes were added.
Alright, so if I add sugar based on the alcohol percentage I want to achive it's still possible?
I'm really really new into the world of brewing, but I want to try something that doesn't exist yet.
 
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Hii, so I wanted to brew a dark chestnut beer, something new, I use the following ingredients with the following reasonings.
If you disagree about one reasoning or know something to make the idea better, please tell me.

240g hops, (not pallets, but frozen hop cones)
5L * 5g * (7 or 8 ), But since they dont come from the plastic I don't risk lesser quality to give me less material and go for 240g

2000g chestnuts (frozen and salted to dry)
Chestnut contains 35% material that can be broken down into sugars, so having double of that is great compared to usual malt which contains +/- 60%.

1000g malt (don't really know the brand or family to be fair)
This contains enough amylase to break down its own starch and the starch of the chestnuts

baker's yeast
I want the beer to be more corbonated and a little more sour compared to usual beer since I expect a lot of sugar to take over the taste.
(since there is double the amount of material to "sugarise".


Further I was thinking about adding coffee or brown sugar.

And cleaning the bottles with honey since bacteria die from that.


Please let me hear your thoughts, I didn't do this yet, but I will probably tomorrow.
 

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Moderator's Note:
I merged your new thread/post on Chestnut beer, into the old one. They are on the same topic.

240g hops, (not pallets, but frozen hop cones)
240 gram hops? That's an extremely high amount of hops for a 5 liter brew. Did you mean 24 gram maybe?
When you boil or hot steep hops they'll add bitterness. Using 240g in 5 liters it may well become undrinkable.

5L * 5g * (7 or 8 ), But since they dont come from the plastic I don't risk lesser quality to give me less material and go for 240g
Can you explain that formula? What are you trying to calculate?

What do you mean with "hops not coming from plastic?" Do you mean they're not packaged?
Where did you get them, from your garden?
How old are they and how were they stored?

1000g malt (don't really know the brand or family to be fair)
This contains enough amylase to break down its own starch and the starch of the chestnuts
Are you sure your malt has enough diastatic power to convert both itself as well as the pulverized chestnuts?

I'm asking because, your total grain/chestnut mix, needs an average diastatic power (DP) of least 35°Lintner, at the very minimum. A bit higher, say 45°L would be better., to make sure it converts fully. At that very minimum, since only 1/3 of your mix is diastatic malt, it needs to supply 3x35=105°Lintner by itself.

Using 45°L as the minimum would require a minimum malt DP of 3*45=135°Lintner would be better, just in case. A good (low kilned) Pilsner malt, or 2-row ale, or wheat malt should be able to provide that.

BTW, are you trying to brew Gluten Free beer (GF), hence the chestnuts? If so, you can't use barley, (or wheat, or rye, etc.).
 
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