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Checking for Bottle Bombs?

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hal simmons

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On January 12 of this year I made an extract stout. Supposed to be a sweet stout with some residual sweetness. These are the fermentables I used.

8 lbs. Muntons Dark DME
1 lb. chocolate malt
1 lb. roasted barley
0.75 lb. black malt
0.5 lb. British crystal malt, 40° L
0.5 lb. dextrin malt
Wyeast 1084 Liquid Yeast (no starter)

The fermentation was very vigorous and had to use a blowoff tube. Fermentation was really strong for the first 5-6 days. After 11 days, the fermentation had slowed to one bubble every 60 seconds, and i racked to a secondary. I know this was probably too early to rack, since after I transfered I took a gravity reading and it was 1.030, but it was too late. Lesson learned. I did not take an OG reading, so I don't know precisely where I started at.

The airlock stopped bubbling for about a half day, then started up really slowly (every 2 minutes) for a couple days and then stopped completely. Fementation temps were at 68-69 for most of the ferment. I left it in the secondary (at 68-69) for another 18 days, checked the gravity, it was still at 1.030, so I decided to bottle.

I used slightly less than the 3/4 cup corn sugar recommended for the 5 gallons, but also had slightly less than expected 5 gallons into the bottles.

I posted an earlier thread about this brew here:
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=52281&highlight=1.030

Some of the comments indicated that 1.030 might be pretty close to where I should have ended up anyway based on the ingredients and amount of specialty grains.

My question is should I expect bombs? How do I go about checking for them? How long before i'm passed the danger point? I've got them carbing at 69 degrees right now, and it's been 10 days since bottling.
 

cheezydemon

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Open 1 now. If it seems OK, open 1 a week for the next few weeks. If it is overcarbed, you can open and re-cap to bleed off some pressure, but that is imprecise at best.
 
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hal simmons

hal simmons

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I just opened one of these to check it for over-carbonation since it's been 10 days. It seems fine. Just got a simple ffssst sound like normal, nothing fizzing over. Poured it into a glass, and got about a half inch head.

It tastes pretty sweet, probably due to the style, and it not attenuating as much as I would have liked. Also, there's a thin layer of yeast on the bottom that's more than I'm used to seeing.

What do you think? Wait another week and check again? Should I be checking these at room temp or put them in the fridge first before opening?
 

BierMuncher

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Between the primary and secondary, you have 29 days in fermenters.

No risk of bottle bombs.

If the carbonation is at the right level, it's time to give these things a week of cold chilling to let the CO2 fully absorb into the beer and enjoy.
 
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