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Cheap Mash Tun For Grain Brewing

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Ok, that is an AWESOME site! Extremely helpful information and helped me to better understand all grain brewing.

I'd be curious as to others thoughts on his re-using yeast process as well.
 

Janx

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desertBrew said:
I'd be curious as to others thoughts on his re-using yeast process as well.
That'll work fine, but I think you're safer to just rack a new batch onto the old yeast slurry...
 

Ruy Lopez

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Is the decision to employ decoction vs single step infusion driven by beer style or level of involvement? That is to say, does decoction offer superior flavors?
 

JEM Australia

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That's a cool site..Thanks for the link.

That guy ended up with a very clear wort.

I've done two all grain batches and they were quite cloudy, probably because I didn't recirculate the first runnings enough??. Does everyone else get nice clear wort like that guy?
 

DeRoux's Broux

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SWEEEEEEEEEETTTTT! Great stuff!!!! :D Gonna make me a mash tun this weekend.

DeRoux's Broux
 

Uncle Fat

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JEM Australia said:
That's a cool site..Thanks for the link.

That guy ended up with a very clear wort.

I've done two all grain batches and they were quite cloudy, probably because I didn't recirculate the first runnings enough??. Does everyone else get nice clear wort like that guy?

I didn't notice that his wort was any clearer than anything I've brewed... I've never been too worried about wort clarity. It's the finished product that I care about. I use a tblsp of irish moss for the last 20 minutes of the boil. It pretty much does the trick for me.
 

Janx

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The clarity of the runnings really has very little to do with the clarity of the finished product. Recirculating a few quarts won't really change anything. Most of it settles out.

Recirculating a LOT does seem to help. We always got crystal clear wort and finished beer with a RIMS system...
 
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Janx said:
That'll work fine, but I think you're safer to just rack a new batch onto the old yeast slurry...
I do a two-stage ferment and don't have enough equipment (yet) to get another batch going from the primary yeast slurry right after racking. I'd end up with a 2 week primary ferment then. Can I extract from the secondary and toss that back into the primary? Don't know if I'd do that but curious to the response. The easiest thing would be to go get me another carboy!
 

Janx

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desertBrew said:
I do a two-stage ferment and don't have enough equipment (yet) to get another batch going from the primary yeast slurry right after racking. I'd end up with a 2 week primary ferment then. Can I extract from the secondary and toss that back into the primary? Don't know if I'd do that but curious to the response. The easiest thing would be to go get me another carboy!
Sure, you can do it. When I've needed to re-use my primary for one reason or another, I've racked it, then as it gets towards the bottom, schwirl it up good and transfer the racking to a jug or something. Try to suck up as much yeast slurry as possible by using the can like a vacuum cleaner and rocking the carboy. That's your pitch for the batch you're making today.

And of course, sanitizing everything is of even greater than usual importance in this operation.
 
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Janx said:
Sure, you can do it. When I've needed to re-use my primary for one reason or another, I've racked it, then as it gets towards the bottom, schwirl it up good and transfer the racking to a jug or something. Try to suck up as much yeast slurry as possible by using the can like a vacuum cleaner and rocking the carboy. That's your pitch for the batch you're making today.

And of course, sanitizing everything is of even greater than usual importance in this operation.
I was referring to the sediment in the secondary, throwing that back into a primary after the 2 weeks are up in the carboy. Is that reusable yeast as well or is it really best to only go with the primary if one was to reuse?
 
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ChrisKoivu

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If there is a lot of the yeast slurry in the secondary fermenter, it is useable. Alot of times there isnt much yeast left in the secondary, as the fermenter is usually clean on the bottom. But I know a lot of people who use yeast from the secondary, and they prefer it to the primary.
 
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ChrisKoivu said:
If there is a lot of the yeast slurry in the secondary fermenter, it is useable. Alot of times there isnt much yeast left in the secondary, as the fermenter is usually clean on the bottom. But I know a lot of people who use yeast from the secondary, and they prefer it to the primary.
I seem to get about 1/2 in of sediment in my seconday. I usually rack at 5 days. So is that all yeast (or a fair amount?)
 
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ChrisKoivu

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I got this from BYO.COM... I hope it answers your question...


Should you use the yeast from the primary or secondary fermenter? Yeast from the secondary has gone through a longer fermentation period and spent more time in an alcohol-rich environment. For that reason, some brewers believe they are “tired” and less suitable than yeast from the primary. On the other hand, the yeast from the primary will have more trub mixed in with them, so some brewers feel the yeast from the secondary are “cleaner.” I’d prefer fresh, “dirty” to “tired,” clean yeast, but good beer has been made using both methods.
 
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