Changed co2 hose, didn't flush before connecting to keg

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

kiwipen

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2016
Messages
253
Reaction score
49
Like the title said, I changed the hose going from the regulator to the gas QD, and I think I forgot to flush some co2 trough it before connecting it to a keg. It took a while before I realized what I might have done, and I wish I hadn't realized it at all.

It's a newly kegged (closed transfer) pilsner, and there is about 3,2 gallons in a 5 gallon keg, so a lot of head space that would be hard to purge.

How bad is this?
 

tracer bullet

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Aug 10, 2020
Messages
789
Reaction score
637
Location
Minnesota
Just the line? Depends on the length. Probably not too bad though.

If you drink fast, don't worry. If you're slow, then CO2 isn't expensive just do some purging.

What kind of line? If it's not EVA Barrier or similar then you may have been getting O2 all along and not really even notice.
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
18,309
Reaction score
8,447
Location
Pasadena, MD
How long and what ID is that line? That's the volume of air you pushed into your keg. 21% of that is O2. It's likely to be a very small amount.

Are you using the typical 5/16" ID red gas line? That will let more O2 into your headspace in one day than the amount you just pushed into your keg.
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
18,309
Reaction score
8,447
Location
Pasadena, MD
If you are already using EVA Barrier lines, you could push the beer into another 100% liquid pre-purged keg. That will prevent the unintended oxygen uptake over time.
 
OP
kiwipen

kiwipen

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2016
Messages
253
Reaction score
49
I changed to a meter of Evabaerrier line with 6mm (15/64") ID. The old line was braided PVC I think.

It's just the line from the regulator that is Evabarrier, the line to and from the co2 manifold is still braided PVC that I've used for some years.
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
18,309
Reaction score
8,447
Location
Pasadena, MD
I changed to a meter of Evabaerrier line with 6mm (15/64") ID. The old line was braided PVC I think.

It's just the line from the regulator that is Evabarrier, the line to and from the co2 manifold is still braided PVC that I've used for some years.
I'd replace that braided line, ASAP.

If you're really worried about that tiny amount of O2, just transfer the beer. It will take 3.2 gallons of CO2. Plus the 5.5 gallons to liquid prepurge the receiving keg if you don't have one ready.

Air volume in your 1 meter of 6mm EVA line:
0.2826 cm2 * 100 cm = 28.26 ml of air
28.26 * 0.21 = 5.93 ml of O2.
 
OP
kiwipen

kiwipen

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2016
Messages
253
Reaction score
49
This might be a discussion for another thread, but is Evabarrier that important? Did everyone struggle with oxidated kegged beer before Evabarrier came to market?
 

day_trippr

"This Space For Rent"
Joined
May 31, 2011
Messages
37,508
Reaction score
20,347
Location
Stow, MA
People struggled with beer staling overnight in their PVC lines. Still do, if they haven't switched yet.
Leaving an oxygen sieve connected to a keg for weeks on end also doesn't seem prudent if staling isn't your bag.
I switched every inch of beer and gas tubing to EVABarrier a couple of Novembers ago. Eliminated the line-staling paradigm for sure and surely reduced the O2 uptake at the kegs...

Cheers!
 

Brewdog80

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 17, 2021
Messages
98
Reaction score
89
This might be a discussion for another thread, but is Evabarrier that important? Did everyone struggle with oxidated kegged beer before Evabarrier came to market?
No. It's not that critical. Its homebrew. Every batch you make is slightly different. And NoBody can actually, positively state that 6ml of air, or a millionth of a ml per week coming through a 3 ft line will stale a beer. Spend your money on ingredients.
 

Brewdog80

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 17, 2021
Messages
98
Reaction score
89
Bull, you have CO2 in the beer. The beer and the co2 is under pressure higher than atmospheric pressure. O2 isn't going to move into the beer, co2 is going to move out if anything happens at all.
 

tracer bullet

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Aug 10, 2020
Messages
789
Reaction score
637
Location
Minnesota
Bull, you have CO2 in the beer. The beer and the co2 is under pressure higher than atmospheric pressure. O2 isn't going to move into the beer, co2 is going to move out if anything happens at all.
Bull. By that logic, carbonated beer would never oxidize. I hope you don't need convincing that oxidation happens and does so rapidly enough to affect the flavor (i.e. a NEIPA and a time frame of single digit days).

As always it's a time / intensity thing. Instantaneous bad beer? No. Drink it quickly and not notice? Probably. Have a hoppy beer sit around for a month? Will surely notice it.

More than one gas can be in a liquid at once.
 

day_trippr

"This Space For Rent"
Joined
May 31, 2011
Messages
37,508
Reaction score
20,347
Location
Stow, MA
Under most circumstances, beer is an oxygen sponge.
And the Partial Pressure Gas Laws ensure there is no one-way street to be found here.
Finally, there is a lot of meh homebrew out there....

Cheers!
 

Gozie Boy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2017
Messages
273
Reaction score
232
Evabarrier (and some other beverage and gas tubings) are "less permeable" to oxygen (than e.g. vinyl) due to their special liners. I haven't researched this to any great extent, maybe others here have. Are there any data available that quantify the O2 transmissibilities? I'm curious to know whether it is "somewhat" better, substantially (e.g. OOM) better, or "you will NOT have a meaningful O2 ingress problem for a year+" level better than vinyl?

Also, would it still be beneficial to disconnect these higher quality lines when not in use and then purge them before returning to service, or are they good enough to render that process unnecessary [assuming a moderate level (every few days) of home use]? Thx.
 

Latest posts

Top