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Ceramic stove-top weight limits

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Apimyces

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I've got a glass ceramic electric range, and I've read here and there about those being more fragile and to be careful about the weight put on them.

My model is jcb840dk1ww, but the manual says absolutely nothing on how much weight I could or shouldn't put on it.

I've been using spare regular kettles (have to use 2 for 5 gal batch), and I'm looking for something more practical, with a thermometer and valve. As big as I can put on the stove, really, but I don't want to break it. 7-20 gals, maybe?

There'd be no impact-related risk, though, as I'd be filling it with a pump, and emptying it from the stove-top. The kettle, when full, would not be moved.
 

AJinJacksonville

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I found the below quote on the manufacturer website support page:

"Our range and cooktop glass cooking surfaces (radiant, induction, gas-on-glass) are tested for a maximum weight limit of 50lbs. Gas ranges are also tested to this weight."
 

wilserbrewer

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In addition to the fear of breaking the glass top, I have read reports that a large kettle with a larger diameter can overheat the element causing it to temporarily shut off and cycle, making for an even longer time to heat for a unit that is already challenged.

The 3500w induction plates are likely much less expensive than a stove repair. :)
 

Soulshine2

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I've got a glass ceramic electric range, and I've read here and there about those being more fragile and to be careful about the weight put on them.

My model is jcb840dk1ww, but the manual says absolutely nothing on how much weight I could or shouldn't put on it.

I've been using spare regular kettles (have to use 2 for 5 gal batch), and I'm looking for something more practical, with a thermometer and valve. As big as I can put on the stove, really, but I don't want to break it. 7-20 gals, maybe?

There'd be no impact-related risk, though, as I'd be filling it with a pump, and emptying it from the stove-top. The kettle, when full, would not be moved.
keep in mind water is roughly 8 lbs per gallon x how many gallons you're heating. plus the weight of your vessel.
 

kh54s10

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yes, I was just referring to strike water but you are correct in correcting me if the OP is BIAB'ing.
I just re read the OP. I see about pumping into the vessel, so?? I was assuming extract of BIAB....

If pumping from a mash tun, then the only ingredients would be hops, spices, maybe fruit = not much added weight.
 

Soulshine2

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either way ...8.3# x 6.5 = 53.95# plus kettle ...its pushing the limits
 
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Apimyces

Apimyces

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I found the below quote on the manufacturer website support page:

"Our range and cooktop glass cooking surfaces (radiant, induction, gas-on-glass) are tested for a maximum weight limit of 50lbs. Gas ranges are also tested to this weight."
Ouch, 50/8.3= 6.02 gallons. That's pretty tight, especially when one starts to consider the weight of the other stuff going on there...

In addition to the fear of breaking the glass top, I have read reports that a large kettle with a larger diameter can overheat the element causing it to temporarily shut off and cycle, making for an even longer time to heat for a unit that is already challenged.

The 3500w induction plates are likely much less expensive than a stove repair. :)
The elements cycle, I think that's just the normal operating mode for ceramic top ranges. But yea, one is supposed to match the diameter of the kettle with the diameter of the element, with no more than half an inch excess or so I believe. Probably means it takes longer to boil... but electricity is way cheaper than propane. 4,9 cents per kwh iirc, while propane is more expensive per BTU produced, and also less efficient due to the heat that's lost to the air instead of the kettle. I also don't have a propane range, and I doubt my wife would approve of me using the propane burner indoors.

The induction plate would be an extra expense... but I'll look into that, could indeed be worth it. The oven's fairly new, wife would not approve of me breaking it. Do stainless steel kettles work with induction?

yes, I was just referring to strike water but you are correct in correcting me if the OP is BIAB'ing.
Correct, I'm doing partial mashes with liquid extract and BIAB.

either way ...8.3# x 6.5 = 53.95# plus kettle ...its pushing the limits
Kettle and ingredients, though I'm not using all that many. Still, about 6.5lb of extract, grains, and adjuncts.

How much does a kettle weigh, anyways?
 

Jayjay1976

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I wonder if the 50lb guidance is per burner, or total range surface combined? It seems like you could easily surpass that with 4 ordinary stockpots and cast iron dutch ovens. If it is in fact per burner, your larger diameter pot might spread the weight over a great enough area to lessen the risk of surpassing the stated 50lb limit. Also keep in mind there is a factor of safety built in to that rating, could be as much as 50-100% more than the stated limit. I can tell you with absolute certainty that domestic cookware handles must be designed to carry at least twice what the vessel weighs when full of water. In practice, most quality brands will support in excess of three times that weight, as a matter of durability. Your GE range might not be a top-of-the-line model, but I would call them for clarity. Tell them you are making a large batch of bone broth in a X gallon pot with X pounds of bones. If you are brewing a 5 gallon batch, your pre-boil volume should be around ~6.25 gallons so you can likely get away with a 32qt pot.
 

AJinJacksonville

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Assuming it is under warranty...convince them that a small saucepot with chicken noodle soup caused the catastrophic failure...haha.
 
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Apimyces

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Any recommendations for the counter-top alternative? Looking on amazon, 3500w mentioned prior seems to be on 240v only, while 120v only seems to go up to 1800w. Moving the range out of its place to plug in the countertop ain't really an option, and the laundry room is really, really tiny... I'm not sure I could fit much in there to use the 240v outlet. I'll have to look at that closely.

So any "best buys" for 120v or 240v? Also, is there a chart on how long it will take to boil X gallons depending on wattage of the element? And does induction work on all stainless steel kettles?
 

applescrap

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I have brewed five gallon batches on a glass top, in an aluminum kettle, without damaging anything but my waistline.
same here, but the new stove drove me outside. Truth be told I like brewing outside, making messes and laughing. My new stove feels, thinner. They rate them for turkey and dinner. A major issue is scarring. Ime brewing will scar your stove, at this point I've had my new stove long enough and dislike it enough that I don't give a f and would brew on it. And I'm still kicking myself 4 not saving that old stove and brewing in the garage on it. So I went ebiab, no pumps.

I read the same stories, also the heat outside diameter is a potential issue. Depending on make and model that glass isnt too expensive, but melting the wires somehow would suck. If its new scarring like mine was scarring was my first concern. Clearly some risk is inherited with brewing on a glass stove. That said my experience and many others was good.
 

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propane burner cheap....glass top? not cheap...
 
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Apimyces

Apimyces

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propane burner cheap....glass top? not cheap...
The propane burner itself isn't very expensive, but propane is considerably more expensive to use than electricity. More importantly, though, I want to brew inside, and I'd rather not open flames, and I don't want to worry about carbon monoxide.

Looking more into the matter, though, I noticed there are electric elements one can put into the kettle, that go to 5.5kw, and really don't cost all that much. Countertops cost many hundreds for far less wattage, and my range's most powerful element is 3kw...

Looks like the solution to me. Just gonna unplug the dryer and set up the kettle in the laundry room, and boil with a 5.5kw electric element.

If I use it on 70L, that's about 1.33 hours to bring to boil. 2.33h*5.5kw=12.8kwh. At 4.37 cents per kwh... about 56 cents of electricity to make a 15 gal batch, for an element that cost a few dozen bucks. Seems like a way better solution than using my range, buying a counter-top, or using propane?
 
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odie

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I installed a 120v 1550watt element. It will boil my full 12 gal kettle with lid on. Takes time getting there but will do it. Since I only need half that volume it does great. Especially since the mash is already heated anyway.
 

odie

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I think the element cost under 20. And I salvaged an old power strip for the wiring, cb , plug and switch
 

madscientist451

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I brew on my stovetop using a 7.5 gallon pot. No problems to report.
If you are worried about it, brew 3.5 gallon batches, when first starting the boil, you'll be close to the 50 lb limit, but quickly go below that as water evaporates. Brewing in the kitchen when the wind is howling and its freezing outside is the only way to go.
The range hood carries away the steam, and you can do other stuff in the kitchen during the brew day, like bottling or kegging a previous brew.
 

AF1HomeBrew

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I use induction for regulating my mashtun (20 g Spike) and HLT (20 g BruGear) kettles. They are plugged into my BCS for controlling. To handle the weight on my brewstation I built in a spring loaded shelf so that the hot plate makes contact with the bottom of the kettles but doesn't take all of the weight of the water,grain, and equipment.
 

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TheFlyingSparge

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save yourself the trouble of breaking your stove and either heat through electric element or propane burner. I have a glass top stove. It would take FOREVER to heat the water I need to do 10gal. Good luck.
 

AF1HomeBrew

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Any recommendations for the counter-top alternative? Looking on amazon, 3500w mentioned prior seems to be on 240v only, while 120v only seems to go up to 1800w. Moving the range out of its place to plug in the countertop ain't really an option, and the laundry room is really, really tiny... I'm not sure I could fit much in there to use the 240v outlet. I'll have to look at that closely.

So any "best buys" for 120v or 240v? Also, is there a chart on how long it will take to boil X gallons depending on wattage of the element? And does induction work on all stainless steel kettles?
Induction only works on kettles w/Tri Clad bottoms. A few Examples: Spike or The Megapot . 1800w is as high as you will find for 120v.
 

madscientist451

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save yourself the trouble of breaking your stove and either heat through electric element or propane burner. I have a glass top stove. It would take FOREVER to heat the water I need to do 10gal. Good luck.
Its not going to break if you keep an eye on your limits. You could brew a 10 gallon batch on your kitchen stove, but you'd have to do back to back brews. If there's a will, there's a way.
I get the boil going faster by using a smaller side pot if I'm in a hurry.
 

toddo97

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I did a few batches on my glasstop. My last one was ~7 gallons of water + grain spread over two burners. Now one of my large burners only glows around the perimeter :( Oh well--live and learn. Now I'm all propane unless I find a good deal on an induction burner for inside.
 

bleme

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To see if your pot will work on an induction burner, try to stick a magnet to the bottom. If there is no 'grab', induction won't work.
 

JohnSand

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My new stove feels, thinner. They rate them for turkey and dinner. A major issue is scarring. Ime brewing will scar your stove,
Funny thing, my wife constantly fretted about the risk of scratching the stove top with my brew kettle or iron cookware. But she scratched it while I was away. I prefer to brew outside when possible anyway.
Sorry for the thread drift.
 
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