Blonde Ale Centennial Blonde (Simple 4% All Grain, 5 & 10 Gall)

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Brooothru

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2012
Messages
1,797
Reaction score
1,496
Location
Either in the brewery or on the road
My problem would be tying up my fermentation chamber for 2 months. Read around the forum a little, but the general consensus is that the oxygen exposure and risk of contamination from the transfer does more damage than sitting on dormant yeast; at least in the homebrew scale.
This recipe I brewed in 2019 and my records show I kegged after 14 days.
10 days and going into a stainless steel keg would be okay, but I personally wouldn't bottle anything in less than 14 days (I don't like bottle bombs). When I bottle (which is not very often) I'm normally in the fermenter for 21-28 days. I normally keg after 14-21 days for an ale.
Good luck and let us know how it turns out.
I think it's about time to brew this one again.
A good work-around compromise might be to transfer, under pressure if able, just before your expected final gravity, say 5 or fewer points before FG. If slow fermentation is still ongoing when you transfer it'll go a long way to mitigating any bad effects from oxygenation and prevent any issues of yeast autolysis or off flavors resulting from extended contact with trub or settled solids. Contemporary belief is that autolysis is low risk on the home brew scale, whereas oxygenation and infections are very real possibilities when racking from a primary to a secondary fermentation. That said, several months aging of a Westvleteren clone might be worth considering it. Plus, if you cap the fermenter when fermentation has slowed to near completion you'll benefit from natural carbonation. A spunding valve is an inexpensive and desirable solution to the issue of carbonation.
 

rtstrider

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2016
Messages
608
Reaction score
272
I brewed this on Friday and pitched the yeast at 330pm. It's been almost 4 full days now and the krausen is starting to drop. I fermented at 60F and went old school with the plastic bucket fermenter. I forgot how fast Notty is! Bumped up the temp to 62F this morning and will bump up 2F every 12 hours until it's 68F then it's going outside of the ferment fridge for a few days. Hoping to have this kegged up and cold conditioning/carbing this weekend. Would like to throw some gelatin in there and let it start clearing so it'll be ready for the FSU Notre Dame game. Will probably need a good bit of this brew during and after the game lol
 

Brooothru

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2012
Messages
1,797
Reaction score
1,496
Location
Either in the brewery or on the road
I brewed this on Friday and pitched the yeast at 330pm. It's been almost 4 full days now and the krausen is starting to drop. I fermented at 60F and went old school with the plastic bucket fermenter. I forgot how fast Notty is! Bumped up the temp to 62F this morning and will bump up 2F every 12 hours until it's 68F then it's going outside of the ferment fridge for a few days. Hoping to have this kegged up and cold conditioning/carbing this weekend. Would like to throw some gelatin in there and let it start clearing so it'll be ready for the FSU Notre Dame game. Will probably need a good bit of this brew during and after the game lol
Notre Dame will be a tough one. Hard times since the Glory Days (RIP, Bobby. I still treasure the pics of Bobby and my daughter, as well as the autographed football from the BCS Championship year). Jimbo didn't do anybody any favors, other than leaving. It's gonna be a long road back.

In the meantime, good luck with the beer. At the very least it'll ease the pain.
 

rtstrider

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2016
Messages
608
Reaction score
272
This was ready for kegging exactly 10 days after brew day. 9 days it still had a touch of cleaning up that needed to be done. 10 days was perfect. My observations so far on this batch is that it is significantly better than last batch (about a year ago). If you go back and read my posts I stated my try at this was more like a pale ale. The difference on this batch and last batch is the water source. I also fermented with notty (rehydrated) at 60f this time. Last time I used filtered fridge water with campden and no other adjustments. Wanted to experiment with my city water. Beer was fine but not what it should be. Usually I use Reverse Osmosis water from the store. Well that’s exactly what I did this time and used the yellow balanced water profile from Bruin Water. Now this tastes like a blonde with some citrus notes and a little bit of yeast character. It’s a blonde ale with life! I plan on hitting this with gelatin in a day or two then letting it sit till Sunday kickoff. I’ll post some pics once I have a nice proper pour! I stand corrected on my previous review. Thanks for the recipe Biermuncher!
 

rtstrider

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2016
Messages
608
Reaction score
272
I tapped the keg this morning. Mainly to blow out the crud that the gelatin settled out and to let the liquid lines/cobra tap cool down until this evening. Will take a pic of a proper pour in the glass this evening!
 

rtstrider

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2016
Messages
608
Reaction score
272
Now this has age on it. I have to say I cannot recommend drinking this beer young. It’s been in the keg for around 6 weeks now and it’s really hit it’s stride imo. Once the yeast dropped out this beer is right where it should be. Prior to this there was just way too much character (pulled a good bit of stone fruit from the yeast (apricot)) to call this a blonde ale. So cold conditioning, or filtering, is a must for my taste buds at least. Here is a picture of the brew now. From clarity standpoint it is VERY clear! Personally I really like where this beer is now. This will be a rebrew next year and I’ll definitely use a floating dip tube for the next go around. This is just six weeks in the keg with gelatin.
CC77B342-D5FF-4293-8FFE-F24C3A5B09BC.jpeg
 

Latest posts

Top