Cask conditioning - question re sugar amounts

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calgary222

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I am switching from a 50's fridge/kegerator to a keezer that will allow me to set up a beer engine. I'll adopt the propane regulator mentioned elsewhere on this site for the keg that I will be drinking right away, but since I brew 20 gallons, there will be several kegs in waiting.

Maybe I am overthinking or over worrying it, but can someone validate this approach?

1. Fermenter to 4 corny kegs
2. Add 1/2 cup sugar per keg (I think this was the ratio from pre-keg days, is it less for cask conditioning?)
3. Close up and let sit - do I need to vent kegs at any point?
4. Plug and play with beer engine
 

cyberbackpacker

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Here is a great starting point for how to condition your casks-- start here and you can always adjust for your particular tastes on future batches:

Cask:
Standard procedure:
1) let the beer ferment until finished and then give it another day or so. For me right around 5-7 days.
2) Rack the beer to your vessel of choice (firkin, polypin, cornie, whatever).
3) Add primings at ~3.5g/L
4) Add prepared isinglass at 1ml/L
5) ONLY add dry hops at 0.25g/l – 1g/L.
6) Bung it up and roll it around to mix. Condition at 55F or so for 4-5 days and its ready to go.
Spile/vent. Tap. Settle. Serve at 55F.
 
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calgary222

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Thanks!

And the remaining kegs can sit for extended periods before being tapped? I assume so, just confirming,



Cheers
 
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Qhrumphf

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I prefer the old school method of racking to pin 1°P above terminal FG and then cooling to cellar temps and spiling to reach equilibrium. No priming required.
 
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