Carbonation choices

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Brewer_Dad

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 5, 2020
Messages
63
Reaction score
76
Location
Peñalolén
Hi all...

So, new to kegging. First was set it and forget it, took a couple of weeks but turned fine. Second was forced carbed 2 days ago, a disaster, but could save it thanks to this


Now I want to try burst carb, 30-40 psi for a day or so. Any pointers?

It's a 5 gal batch, now cold crashing at 2 celsius.

Thanks!
 

Mtrhdltd

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2020
Messages
189
Reaction score
130
Fyi, when using bottled co2 its all forced carbonation, just a matter of how fast you force it. I recommend set and forget. Beer needs cold conditioning time anyways. My beers like 2 weeks, so why worry about carbonating quicker?
 

Vale71

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Messages
3,520
Reaction score
1,861
A day or so at 40 PSI may still get you overcarbonated beer. One poster used an accurate scale to measure the amount of CO2 absorbed by the beer in order to avoid this issue (paging bracconiere!).
 

grampamark

Icons clast. Inquire within.
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 1, 2017
Messages
8,308
Reaction score
13,917
Location
The Frozen Tundra/The Magic City
One can split the difference between force carbing and set and forget. For several years, probably 50-60 batches, I’ve been setting the pressure at 30 psi for 24 hours and then turning the gas off, to allow the beer to absorb the C02 in the headspace, for 12-24 hours, then setting the pressure to the chart pressure for my temperature and desired carb level. This results in well carbonated beer in 4-5 days instead of 2 weeks and avoids over carbonation.
 

Number13brewer

Active Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
29
Reaction score
8
Location
Grove City
Fyi, when using bottled co2 its all forced carbonation, just a matter of how fast you force it. I recommend set and forget. Beer needs cold conditioning time anyways. My beers like 2 weeks, so why worry about carbonating quicker?
New to kegging as well. So when you say “set it and forget it” does that include serving pressure as well? Like let’s say I set my psi to 9 @ 45°F do I leave it there to serve the beer too or turn down the PSI?
 

McKnuckle

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Feb 10, 2014
Messages
3,231
Reaction score
2,668
Location
Anywhere But Here
It means you set it to appropriate long-term serving pressure for your system, and don't touch the setting again til you finish the keg. Actually, you may never touch it again. I don't - my regulator stays at 12 psi literally all the time.

FYI, 9 psi @ 45ºF is potentially not enough pressure for adequate carbonation. You'll achieve about 2.0 volumes with that combo. Might want to shoot for a bit higher, say 2.4 volumes, with 13-14 psi.
 

Mtrhdltd

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2020
Messages
189
Reaction score
130
Yep, set regulator to serving pressure and leave it alone. One of my regulators stays at 12 psi. The other changes slightly depending on beer style.
 

Number13brewer

Active Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
29
Reaction score
8
Location
Grove City
It means you set it to appropriate long-term serving pressure for your system, and don't touch the setting again til you finish the keg. Actually, you may never touch it again. I don't - my regulator stays at 12 psi literally all the time.

FYI, 9 psi @ 45ºF is potentially not enough pressure for adequate carbonation. You'll achieve about 2.0 volumes with that combo. Might want to shoot for a bit higher, say 2.4 volumes, with 13-14 psi.
Makes sense to me! Thanks for your advice. I appreciate it.
 

gnef

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2005
Messages
1,432
Reaction score
216
My process is a bit different. After I transfer a beer to the keg, I look up the CO2 chart and find the room temperature on it to set the PSI to the proper level, and then I rock it on the floor (I usually lay it down and stand on it to roll it back and forth, but sometimes I just shake it vigorously).

This way, you will never overcarbonate the beer. I generally undercarbonte it a bit this way, and then once it is chilled, I leave it connected to CO2, and within a couple days it is exactly where it needs to be. This has worked well for me for a long while, but figure out what works best for your process!
 
Top