Carbonating a high ABV, BBA beer

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NaymzJaymz

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I'm getting ready to bottle a 5 gallon batch of imperial stout that has been barrel aged. I hit all my numbers per BeerSmith, including the measured FG of 1.018, so I will assume the ABV is the estimate 10.9%. My question is, should I introduce yeast to this beer at bottling time to get successful carbonation? Any ideas and advice would be appreciated. First time doing a BBA or a beer of this size. Thanks in advance.
 
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If you can borrow an in-line carbonation system it would be the most effective way to do it. You should also carb higher than charts as you’ll lose some as you bottle.
A beer gun would be handy, too.
 
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NaymzJaymz

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Which yeast did you use? Your apparent ABV is at the top of the range for many popular yeasts. Spend a few minutes with The Google and find out what the yeast you used will tolerate.
The yeast is Wyeast #1762, which is the yeast they recommend for imperial stout. Sorry, should've said that. The fact that my FG matches the software would suggest this yeast was happy in this beer. You mentioned doing some online research, is there info out there regarding the residual yeast and it's ability to carbonate? Sorry to sound naïve. Thanks for responding.
 

grampamark

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Jaymz-Here's a recent thread whch deals with your question.

I've successfully bottled a 9% stout without adding additional yeast. But, I haven't bottled, much, since I started kegging about 5 years ago. Your beer might have one foot, so to speak, on either side of the line between having enough viable yeast to carb in the bottle and coming up short.

Maybe someone who regularly bottles high gravity beers will chime in. I've based my replies on my experience, which may not be completely relevant to your question.
 
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1. It's high ABV
2. It's been sitting in a barrel for how long?
If it were mine, just-to-be-sure, I'd add 1/4 packet of CBC-1 yeast at bottling time. Can't hurt, and after all the work you've put in it, if it didn't carb what a shame that would be.
 

Beer666

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Not an expert by any means but I have had mixed results carbonating my stouts. I use kveik yeast which should go up to 12% or more but my last 10.5% beer was flat. I bottle after 2 weeks so next time I am going to use bottling yeast.
 
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NaymzJaymz

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Jaymz-Here's a recent thread whch deals with your question.

I've successfully bottled a 9% stout without adding additional yeast. But, I haven't bottled, much, since I started kegging about 5 years ago. Your beer might have one foot, so to speak, on either side of the line between having enough viable yeast to carb in the bottle and coming up short.

Maybe someone who regularly bottles high gravity beers will chime in. I've based my replies on my experience, which may not be completely relevant to your question.
Jaymz-Here's a recent thread whch deals with your question.

I've successfully bottled a 9% stout without adding additional yeast. But, I haven't bottled, much, since I started kegging about 5 years ago. Your beer might have one foot, so to speak, on either side of the line between having enough viable yeast to carb in the bottle and coming up short.

Maybe someone who regularly bottles high gravity beers will chime in. I've based my replies on my experience, which may not be completely relevant to your question.
Thank you, Mark.
 

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