Caramelizing Honey for Bochet

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Kickass

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2009
Messages
802
Reaction score
427
Location
Tehachapi
I’m sure this is covered but I’ve come across many conflicting ways for caramelizing honey and was hoping for some advice.

1. Should I caramelize the honey without adding water?

2. What’s the best way to avoid over caramelizing? Go by temp or color?

3. Any additional advice or sources I should follow?

Thanks in advance for helping this beer brewer dabble in mead!
 
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
2,885
Reaction score
1,087
Location
Ellsworth
I've done it on a stove, but have found it's much easier in an oven at 325. Be sure to use a large volume kettle because this will expand 5-6 x, and sticky burnt honey on the oven floor will not make SWMBO very happy. I check the temp and a sample for color every 15 minutes until it hits what I'm looking for. There is a thread somewhere around here started by someone else that I've contributed to, that details the time, temp and color of several different batches. Look around and you'll find it.
 

Falstaff

A Bad Influence
Joined
Jul 14, 2021
Messages
338
Reaction score
658
@JimRausch thank you, that’s an informative read.

Do you add water or is it just honey?
No water, I think adding water could make it explode, like adding water to hot oil, but I'm not positive. Use a tall pot because it will expand ALOT. The stuff burns and sticks like napalm. Use extreme caution during the process or you could end up in the hospital. Nothing hurts like a burn.
 
OP
K

Kickass

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2009
Messages
802
Reaction score
427
Location
Tehachapi
Thanks @Falstaff

Another question. I’ve made two batches of traditional mead using the current TOSNA regiment. Does a bochet benefit from the same nutrient feeding?
 

MostlyMetal

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Dec 27, 2020
Messages
27
Reaction score
16
While I haven't done it myself, I've seen others put the honey in a crockpot and cook it that way. It will cook pretty fast though so you still have to keep an eye on it, but it seems to be an effective method if you don't want to sit and stir non-stop.
 

homebrudoc

Active Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2017
Messages
39
Reaction score
34
I'm getting ready to prep one for this fall. Previously, I have put the honey into quart mason jars with about 1/2 tsp yeast nutrient in each quart, particularly diammonium phosphate to provide a nitrogen source. Theoretically, this would favor Maillard reactions over caramelization. First one I did, I processed the honey in a pressure cooker for 90 minutes. Black as night and delicious. I did not enter it into any competitions to provide you with any "proof of success". YMMV.

I actually think this next one I will process half the honey with the DAP and half without any additions to look for as much complexity in the final product as possible (some Maillard, some caramelized).

Not to be rude but I rarely check this forum so if you post any questions, you may have to PM me for me to notice.
Hope this provides some food for thought
homebrudoc
 
Top