Cappuccino stout

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KenDawg19

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Does anyone know what Lagunita uses to make the Cappuccino Stout? Is it actual cappuccino?

Has anyone tried to make a cappuccino stout? If so, when do you add the cappuccino?
 

Parker36

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I'm not positive, but I am willing to bet that they did use actual cappuccino grounds in making it. Most likely added it in secondary. Look in the HBT recipe database for various coffee brews for different techniques for adding coffee (or espresso or cappucino) grounds to beer.
 

SnickASaurusRex

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I would use some lactose, not real milk, to sweeten it up and add a smooth creaminess.
Then some cold brew coffee, pasturized and added just at the end of active fermentation.
I would also use a little chocolate malt, and black malt for the bitter roastiness.

That is what I would do.
 

GunnerMan

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I would use some lactose, not real milk, to sweeten it up and add a smooth creaminess.
Then some cold brew coffee, pasturized and added just at the end of active fermentation.
I would also use a little chocolate malt, and black malt for the bitter roastiness.

That is what I would do.
Sounds really good. Yeah real milk would turn your beer into a sesspool of gunk.
 
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KenDawg19

KenDawg19

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Where do I purchase lactose? How much do I add for a 5 gallon batch? And at what point of the brewing process do I add the lactose?

Also, I'm not using a secondary (still new at this brewing thing!). So, if I add the coffee at the end of active fermentation and stir it up, how long should I wait until things settle back down to the bottom? And how do you pasteurize coffee?

Thanks for the good advice.

I would use some lactose, not real milk, to sweeten it up and add a smooth creaminess.
Then some cold brew coffee, pasturized and added just at the end of active fermentation.
I would also use a little chocolate malt, and black malt for the bitter roastiness.

That is what I would do.
 

JesseRC

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you can order lactose at your homebrew store online or local. I would not add too much, I added a pound to a stout, and I did not care for it. I would use no more than half a pound or less, or use a less attenuative yeast. S-04 seems to leave a bit of sweetness in stouts and leave a really compact yeast and trub cake.
 

ChemE

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Lactose is typically added during the last 15 minutes of the boil by the way.
 

GunnerMan

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Yeah I made a stout and added some lactose to it, about a pound as I remember and it was much to sweet.
 

SnickASaurusRex

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-Lactose, maybe 1/3 lb at the last 5 - 15 minutes of boil.
-With the coffee just poor it in when fermentation starts to slow but before it really stops. the remaining convection will mix it thoroughly then just wait as usual for everything to settle and clear up some.
-If you brew the coffee hot then don't worry about pasteurizing it just poor it in hot. If you use a cold brew refrigerator technique, then just before adding, strain and raise the temp of the coffee to 170*F for 5 minutes then add in hot.
-You will only need about a cup of strong strong coffee (maybe 1 cup grounds to 1.75 cups water. I don't really know the absorption rate of coffee).
 

JesseRC

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yup dont add too much. Everyone thinks they want it sweeter, but then when you get it its just to sweet. Next time I will just use less attenuative yeast and maybe mash higher. Plus I think the temp served makes a difference to
 

snailsongs

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Just to clarify: Cappucino is a mixed espresso drink, not a flavor of coffee bean (or the resulting coffee).....It is a straight shot of espresso with nothing but the foam from steamed milk on top.........Starbucks and that good old american marketing machine have bastardized the traditional forms of espresso (and coffee) consumption. In my youth I worked in a cafe that roasted it's own beans back in the early 90's, just before starbucks rose up and made a mockery of fancy coffee drinks. I have old school coffee taste and I frown on flavorings, too! ;-)
 

Pete08

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Where do I purchase lactose? How much do I add for a 5 gallon batch? And at what point of the brewing process do I add the lactose?

Also, I'm not using a secondary (still new at this brewing thing!). So, if I add the coffee at the end of active fermentation and stir it up, how long should I wait until things settle back down to the bottom? And how do you pasteurize coffee?

Thanks for the good advice.
Cost-wise I found it is cheaper to purchase lactose at a health food store. Probably not a big deal unless you use quite a bit. Anyhow, they will most likely not stock it, however, if the store sells NOW brand supplements, they will be able to order NOW lactose. Don't let them sell you LACTAID!! They will try.:D
 
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KenDawg19

KenDawg19

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I picked up a pound of lactose at my LHBS and in case anybody is wondering, it says to "boil in water to sterilize before adding to beer". Can't wait to get started with this next batch.

Thanks for the help everyone!

-Lactose, maybe 1/3 lb at the last 5 - 15 minutes of boil.
-With the coffee just poor it in when fermentation starts to slow but before it really stops. the remaining convection will mix it thoroughly then just wait as usual for everything to settle and clear up some.
-If you brew the coffee hot then don't worry about pasteurizing it just poor it in hot. If you use a cold brew refrigerator technique, then just before adding, strain and raise the temp of the coffee to 170*F for 5 minutes then add in hot.
-You will only need about a cup of strong strong coffee (maybe 1 cup grounds to 1.75 cups water. I don't really know the absorption rate of coffee).
 

WAldenIV

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I'm still pretty new to home brewing process myself and I just made a cream stout from a kit. The kit indicated to add the lactose during bottling. I was planning to add the lactose to the boiling water used for the priming sugar. Is this an acceptable method for adding the lactose? Should I have added the lactose during the boil of the wort?
 

greggor

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I experimented by adding pre measured amounts of fresh brewed espresso to my stout a little at a time. for my palate 0.3 oz of espresso to 12 oz of stout seemed perfect. so I added 16 oz fresh brewed espresso to 5 gallons. I also added 1 oz of Vanilla this was determined in a similar manor. It was all added to finished beer in a keg.
Many many compliments on this beer. The base was a classic Irish dry 80% 2 row 20% flaked barley and 10% roast barley with Wyeast Irish Ale yeast.
 

tekhna

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-Lactose, maybe 1/3 lb at the last 5 - 15 minutes of boil.
-With the coffee just poor it in when fermentation starts to slow but before it really stops. the remaining convection will mix it thoroughly then just wait as usual for everything to settle and clear up some.
-If you brew the coffee hot then don't worry about pasteurizing it just poor it in hot. If you use a cold brew refrigerator technique, then just before adding, strain and raise the temp of the coffee to 170*F for 5 minutes then add in hot.
-You will only need about a cup of strong strong coffee (maybe 1 cup grounds to 1.75 cups water. I don't really know the absorption rate of coffee).
I don't know if I would pasturize the coffee, that defeats the whole purpose of cold-brewed coffee.

"You don't brew ice coffee by cooling down coffee that has been brewed normally. During the cooling process there would be excessive loss of volatiles during the cooling process, unless you can cool the brewed coffee without exposing it to any air." (That Perfect Cup)

It seems as though taking cold-brewed coffee, heating it, and then cooling it again, will touch off this process all over again, which defeats one of the primary reasons why cold-brewing is such a good way of putting coffee into beer.
If you've ever made cold coffee with espresso shots, you'll get a pretty acrid flavor, and many people think that comes from the cooling of the coffee. Similarly, reheated coffee is pretty nasty.

I know sanitation is paramount for beer brewing, but I think it can be done safely without pasteurizing. When I cold-brew, I do it in a growler, so I am working with glass. It's easy to sanitize, you could even sanitize with some star-san or something, and it doesn't react with the coffee like plastic sometimes can. I know of course there is a risk of introducing something yucky from the beans themselves, but I think the risk is somewhat negligible.
Competing opinions?
 
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