candi sugar

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oguss0311

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The last two times that I used Belgian candi sugar, I have had ale that tasted almost cider like. It did Not taste Like cider, but it’s the best adjective that I can think of. The first time, I made a wheat beer- and the LHBS did not have coriander or orange peel- but I went ahead anyway. When I had this taste- I assumed it was because I left two Key ingredients out. This time- I made a saison that is true to the recipe and still has this taste. It’s not bad at all- infact its very geed beer- however- I am very surprised to have two different styles taste so similar. Yes, both the Saison (sp?) and the wheat beer called for coriander, orange peel and candi sugar- but the first time- I did not have two of the three ingredients just listed. Could those of you who know please tell me if what I’m tasting is indeed from the candi sugar, or whatever else comes to mind…
I’ve read that an off flavor of beer at times can be a cidery taste- but I don’t really think that this is what I am dealing with…….I think.
 

Ryanh1801

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What percentage did you use? I have never noticed off flavors from candi sugar? What are you priming with?
 
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oguss0311

oguss0311

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I used one lb of candi sugar- which was the amount called for both times. The first batch was primed with 5oz of priming sugar, and I just kegged half of one batch in a 2.5 gal keg, and used 2.5 oz to prime the remaining 2.5 gal. I would not call what I'm tasting an "off" flavor, just an unexpected one that is fairly prominent
 

Funkenjaeger

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"Cidery" is exactly the word used to describe the flavor contributed when you use a large enough amount of sugar in beer, particularly sucrose (table sugar). Candi sugar is essentially table sugar that's been 'split' into simple sugars and often caramelized, but if you used enough of it I'd still expect a cidery taste as a result. Though a pound doesn't sound like much, it depends greatly on what percentage of the whole batch that pound is - a pound in a high-gravity beer may not be much, but a pound in a low-gravity beer can be more significant. What were the OG's of the recipes in question - ie - what percentage of fermentables came from the candi sugar?
 
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oguss0311

oguss0311

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Great call- thanks Funkenjaeger- I had assumed that somthing like this was the case- I dont have those stats on hand at the moment- but they were not super high gravity beers- both had OG's of around 1.05somthing- so what your saying is making perfect sense. i'll go back to beertools and check oout a breakdown of fermentable sugar. Thanks!
 

brewt00l

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FWIW, I have used up to 16% of fermentable content with out a trace of cidery off flavors in recipes. Keep in mind that acetaldehyde and fermenting warm can enhance the cidery note.
 
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oguss0311

oguss0311

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Thanks for confirming what I had suspected- as to the source of the taste- thats' why this site rocks!.
:off: MikeFlynn74- You still over there? If so- and you find yourself wanting anything- lemme know.
 
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