Can you use honey

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gravity man

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Can you use honey inplace of some of the corn suger in a pilsner? and if so how much?
 

Kai

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I wouldn't do it in a pilsener. The honey character would be out of place.

There are some beers where it can be appropriate, and many styles can be successfully used as the base of a honey ale. I'd honestly master the basics, though, before I got into really fancy stuff like that. It sounds like I'm being boring, but honestly you'll be happier if you master the process before letting your fancy fly free.

Also, pilseners should be all-malt beers. I'd recommend going for liquid kits that don't ask you to use a lot of corn sugar, but rather give you more malt extract (and timed hop additions and steeping grains and yeast that came out of a fridge). Try www.austinhomebrew.com if your LHBS doesn't have good kits that catch your eye.

Good luck with your recipe!
 

okbrewman

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hey gravity man--try some jws bbbbbrown honey----thatll wet your tastebuds
 

okbrewman

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also that "hit the spot" is some good stuff--better than pilsner imo
 

okbrewman

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Yuri_Rage said:
Corn sugar isn't really style appropriate for a pils either. What's your recipe?
I used munsons with 7 cups corn sugar? what do u suggest?
 
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All pilsner malt. Munton's makes both liquid and dry extract. Somewhere between 6 and 8 lbs of light/pale/pils extract and 1 oz of Saaz hops added at 60 mins, then another 1 oz at flameout should make a fine pils.

Remember that a pilsner is a lager, so it should be fermented with a lager yeast at low temperatures (around 55° F or even slightly less), then cold conditioned for several weeks, if not months.
 

okbrewman

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Yuri_Rage said:
All pilsner malt. Munton's makes both liquid and dry extract. Somewhere between 6 and 8 lbs of light/pale/pils extract and 1 oz of Saaz hops added at 60 mins, then another 1 oz at flameout should make a fine pils.

Remember that a pilsner is a lager, so it should be fermented with a lager yeast at low temperatures (around 55° F or even slightly less), then cold conditioned for several weeks, if not months.

thx--i been drinking mine after 8 days in the bottle--oops:tank: --not bad but can get better --will try your way
 

Deofol

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gravity man said:
Can you use honey inplace of some of the corn suger in a pilsner? and if so how much?
Just to answer the question for the sake of the thread.

Yes. You can use honey to prime. I've used it with great success.

Use about 1/2 cup per 5 gallon batch. Primes just as quick as corn sugar in my experience and makes your beer taste better if you enjoy drinking them green/young.

:)
 

okbrewman

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Deofol said:
Just to answer the question for the sake of the thread.

Yes. You can use honey to prime. I've used it with great success.

Use about 1/2 cup per 5 gallon batch. Primes just as quick as corn sugar in my experience and makes your beer taste better if you enjoy drinking them green/young.

:)

im gonna try it---and that means 1/2 cup honey and no sugar to prime right? just mix it in the bottling bucket as normal?
 
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Deofol said:
Use about 1/2 cup per 5 gallon batch. Primes just as quick as corn sugar in my experience and makes your beer taste better if you enjoy drinking them green/young.
If you want a more true-to-style pilsner, prime with DME. Use about 3/4 cup per 5 gallon batch, and no more than 1 cup. This, too, may result in a bit tastier end product.
 
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