Can you mix yeasts instead of

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Willy Boner

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 20, 2007
Messages
525
Reaction score
5
Location
Drain OR
Seems like I read instead of stepping up starters, you can pitch some liquid strain and then pitch some "neutral" yeast strains with it to get your cell count up without the hassle. I'm fairly new to this more advanced stage of brewing but I'd like to start making bigger volumes, either 7.5 or 10 gal. batches and would like to find out if all you do is 1.5 or 2X all the ingredients. I will going to the LBHS for supplies and equipment this weekend. What are these "neutral" strains I think I read? (can't find the info)
:mug:
 

Bobby_M

Vendor and Brewer
HBT Sponsor
Joined
Aug 3, 2006
Messages
25,352
Reaction score
4,412
Location
Whitehouse Station
If you're looking for a strain that is only available in liquid form, you can either buy twice as much ~$12 which is obviously cost prohibitive. You don't want to mix yeast strains because you'll never know which one did the work.

If you're trying to go easy and cheap, just use the best suited dry yeast for your style. English ales, go Danstar Nottingham or Safale S-04. If you're doing an American Ale, go with US-05.
 

Catfish

Art by David Shrigley
Joined
Jul 31, 2005
Messages
840
Reaction score
18
Location
Nishinomiya, Japan
I am not sure why you want to mix yeasts. Are you trying to save money, get mixed or milder yeast flavors (esters and such), or something totally different?
Also what kind of beer are you making; what yeast are you using?
You can mix yeasts but if you are mixing a Belgian yeast and some Nottingham dry yeast in your Triple it may not be worth saving the money.
 

Funkenjaeger

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 8, 2007
Messages
1,595
Reaction score
18
Location
Nashua, NH
It seems to me that if you pitch a small amount of liquid yeast, and then pitch a larger cell count of dry yeast, you're just going to end up with more of the 'neutral' yeast and only a smaller percentage of the specialty liquid yeast, which seems a waste since the liquid yeast is more expensive. I don't know how significant this would be, but if you're only getting a small fraction of the effects/flavor from your liquid yeast, why not just save the money and pitch all dry yeast?
 

kvh

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2005
Messages
342
Reaction score
0
Location
Baltimore, MD
Someone at my HB Meeting last night brought in a hefe with 2 different WL yeasts, mixed. I don't recall which two, but they were both for hefewizens and I think he said one was more banana-y and the other more clove-y.... He let them 'duke it out' in the fermentor. Seems like a fine idea with me... The beer was great.

kvh
 

cubbies

Tastes like butterdirt
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Nov 13, 2006
Messages
1,916
Reaction score
11
Location
St Louis MO
Willy Boner said:
Seems like I read instead of stepping up starters, you can pitch some liquid strain and then pitch some "neutral" yeast strains with it to get your cell count up without the hassle.
Just make a starter...do it once and you will see that it really is not much of a hassle at all.
 

Barley-Davidson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2007
Messages
446
Reaction score
1
Location
Landing, NJ
I haven't tried this myself, but it seems you should be able to make a starter and step it up a few times.

People do it for high gravity beer to get a huge cell count, it should work just as well for a larger batch.
 

david_42

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2005
Messages
25,582
Reaction score
184
Location
Oak Grove
If a liquid yeast starts at 10 billion cells and you add 100 billion dry yeast cells, over 90% of the fermentation will be by the dry yeast. You'll get very little of the character the liquid yeast would produce by itself.
 

CBBaron

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2007
Messages
2,780
Reaction score
21
Location
Cleveland
Starters are really easy to do. If you are starting with a White labs tube or a Wyeast XL pack you can make a 2 liter starter the night before you brew and should have plenty of yeast for most beers. If you are doing a really big beer consider making a smaller beer with the same yeast strain and then pitching on the yeast cake. A big 10gal batch should get plenty of yeast from a small 5gal batch.

I know I wondered why people went through the bother of a starter until I had some problems with a long lag time on a batch. So the next batch I used a starter and realized it really is quite easy.

Craig
 

malkore

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2007
Messages
6,924
Reaction score
53
Location
Nebraska
+1 for a starter. keep things sterile and its really easy to do.
 
Top