Can primary fermentation be done already?

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

matt365

Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2012
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Am on my first batch of home brew. It is a kit from a local brew store. I pitched yeast on Sunday evening and it was actively bubbling later that night. Monday it was going crazy but now (Tuesday morning), it has completely stopped. There is no activity on the fermenter. Is it done or do I need to pitch more yeast? The room has been at a steady 68-70 degrees the entire time. Any input is much appreciated!
 

jmprdood

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2011
Messages
585
Reaction score
22
The vigorous part is done, but it isn't done fermenting until you get several readings on your hydrometer that are the same over a few days - I leave mine for at least 10 days on the short side and up to 3 wks
 

Calder

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2010
Messages
8,545
Reaction score
1,034
Location
Ohio
36 hours is pretty quick, but it does happen. I once had one go from 1.060 to 1.010 in 28 hours. Eventually ended at 1.006. 70 F is fairly warm, which will speed up fermentation. For future reference it is better to try and keep the temp closer to the mid 60s unless using a yeast that specifically requires higher temperatures (Belgians).

If you are using a bucket, the lids can leak at times, and you will not see any action in the airlock when it starts to slow down, because the CO2 is escaping through the leaks in the lid seal.

No worries, leave it a while, and then take an hydrometer sample to see where it is.
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2012
Messages
20
Reaction score
1
Did you take an initial gravity reading? If so check how much the gravity has changed to determine if your beer has reached full attenuation I.e. a 1.056 start gravity to a 1.011-1.018 somewhere in there will be a final number. However the flavor and overall beer usually is better if you give it a week or two to clean up.
 
OP
M

matt365

Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2012
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Thanks for the tips. Bering a rookie at this and was excited to get it into the fermenter, I forgot to take an OG reading so I feel like I'm doing this blind.
 

Pezman1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2009
Messages
470
Reaction score
16
Location
Coppell
Like Calder posted, pay attention to your temps. If the room was 68-70 as you posted that means the beer was warmer than that during active fermentation.
You can get off flavors from fermenting too high and most ale strains (barring the Belgians and such) like it somewhere in the 65-68 range.

Buy a stick- on thermometer (2-3 bucks) for your fermenter. You might be surprised at the temperature differential between ambient and your fermenter. Those yeasties put off some heat when they are busy!

Pez. (homebrew Hefeweizen in hand)
 

Panky

Active Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2012
Messages
26
Reaction score
0
Location
Miami
Thanks for the tips. Bering a rookie at this and was excited to get it into the fermenter, I forgot to take an OG reading so I feel like I'm doing this blind.
No worries :) I totally forgot to take an OG reading as well no my first batch and even my second lol. I did remember to take it on the last batch though which should help...
 

unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Messages
39,152
Reaction score
3,786
Location
Sheffield
The airlock will also slow down or stop when initial fermentation is done. It'll then slowly,uneventfully ferment down to FG. So take a hydrometer reading to see where you are. But it can still take about 3 weeks to finsh fermenting,clean up & settle out clear or slightly misty.
 
Top