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can i use any type of wood to age whiskey?

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jo.trader

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this is the tree, its called Acacia tortilis




and this is wood, i can smell a hint of perfumy bitterness in the red part.
this kind of wood is used mainly for cooking because of its "caramel/honeyish" aroma






 

jtrux

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this is the tree, its called Acacia tortilis




and this is wood, i can smell a hint of perfumy bitterness in the red part.
this kind of wood is used mainly for cooking because of its "caramel/honeyish" aroma






Hard to say. Have you heard of anyone else doing it? You could put a small amount of whisky in a mason jar with some finely chopped chips. Alternate moving from the jar from the freezer to the cabinet (24 hr freezer, 24 hr cabinet). Shaking each time. This will speed the aging process from years to a month. The alternating temperatures simulate the seasons that whiskey goes through in the barrel as the seasons shift from winter to summer. The warm period sucks liquid into the wood, then the cold squeezes it back out leaving a few impurities trapped in the wood. My one concern is not knowing anything about that wood, is it toxic?
 

Beer Viking

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In order to make a bourbon or scotch you need to use oak barrels. I have never heard of any kind of whiskey being made with anything other then oak. The oak is not just used to age the whiskey, but to mellow it out and add flavor.

I hope this helps!
 

Jayjay1976

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You could try using acacia to smoke your malt before brewing, the way Scotch distilleries use peat to smoke their malt. Smoking might do a better job of imparting the desirable caramel/honey notes than aging the spirit on raw wood and might be less likely to poison you if it is toxic. IMO, the smoke is probably safe since people already use it to cook.
 

Jayjay1976

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Acacia is also one of the most common species used to manufacture wooden kitchen products that are designed for direct food contact; spoons, platters, bowls, etc.

Shouldn't be too difficult to identify which supspecies OP has growing locally to rule out that its any of those harmful ones. A quick call to any local conservation office might be all it takes to get a difinitive answer.
 

Jayjay1976

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I missed where OP listed the species in question, Acacia Tortilis.

Excerpt from Wikipedia:
"Timber from the tree is used for furniture, wagon wheels, fence posts, cages, and pens. Vachellia wood was also used exclusively by the Israelites in the Old Testament in the building of the tabernacle and the tabernacle furniture, including the Ark of the Covenant. The pods and foliage, which grow prolifically on the tree, are used as fodder for desert grazing animals. The bark is often used as a string medium in Tanganyika, and is a source for tannin. Gum from the tree is edible and can be used as Gum Arabic. Parts of the tree including roots, shoots, and pods are also often used by natives for a vast number of purposes including decorations, weapons, tools, and medicines.[7]
 
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Jayjay1976

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Wait a minute....aged on acacia, which was used to build the ark of the covenant, would basically be analogous to aged on the ark itself.

Where is OP, btw? Dropped this gem in the middle of a pond and left us to surf the ripples?

I smell some thing weird.
 

Shine0n

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When in doubt...dont!!!

I love to experiment but with an unknown substance I'll not take the chance.

Beautiful wood tho, make a flight serving tray for your likker and use something known for your adjuncts.
 

odorf

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Find some white oak, Cut it up into kindling size pieces
then char the kindling over an open flame
then put the pieces into your jug, and let it sit for a week. OR to your taste preference
chared.png
 

Toxxyc

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I believe that is one of the acacia species we South Africans use as barbecue fire wood. Hasn't killed us yet.
I came here to say this.

I also came here to say that I've tried making whisky with the stronger flavoured woods before, like mesquite wood chips and hickory. It was absolutely horrible. It tastes like wood, not like whisky. Like sucking on a piece of wood. Because sucking wood sounds terrible in all ways to me.
 
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