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Belmont

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I kegged and force carbonated an IPA this weekend but it is too sweet. The recipe said that FG should be 1.013 and I measured 1.017 after two weeks in primary and one week dry-hopping in secondary. The OG was a good bit higher than the recipe predicted due to boil off so I thought this would be fine. This beer is just too sweet though. Is there any way to fix this? Would letting it sit in the keg at room temp for a week or two or more help?
 

Laughing_Gnome_Invisible

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So, it's only 3 weeks old? Yeah....Just let it sit another 3 weeks at least. An IPA needs to be conditioned.
 

Cpt_Kirks

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One of the (many) great things about kegging is the ability to modify the beer in the keg.

I just had a Hefe that came out a little too sweet and fruity, when I was looking for something a little more like Paulaner, with more of a tart finish. I tweeked the Hefe in the keg (after trying the addition in a glass of Hefe first), and now I am drinking it too fast. That poor keg will be dry in no time.

Give it a few more weeks. That may correct the issue.

Then, if you decide to tweek it, do your adding in the glass first. Make VERY sure you have the amounts of what you are going to add right, once you put something in the keg, you can't take it back out.
 

Saccharomyces

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You can always brew up another batch with 20% sugar in the grainbill so it is really really dry, and then blend the two batches.

I recently blended a blonde ale and a pale ale, as the pale ale came out too hoppy (I learned it's a bad idea to FWH with Centennial!). The blended beer is excellent.
 

john from dc

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+1 to blending, in the glass if you're able. it's easy to control the result and pretty much foolproof.
 

Matt Up North

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If your IPA is too sweet at 1.017 then you might not have added enough bittering hops. What was the IBU's prior to dry hopping? Also, I find that when there is too much crystal in an IPA it really makes it sweeter than I like (and I love me some malty beer that is low in bitter). My IPA I just made finished at 1.020 and after I dry hopped it, it was excellent and not sweet tasting at all (though with 5% sugar it was).

If aging in the keg, do it at room temp until finished. The warmer the better (so not at 60, more like 70 to 75ish).
 
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Belmont

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According to the recipe it was 40-45 IBU. I used a new pot and got more boil off than expected so I ended up with a higher OG than the recipe called for. It called for 3/4 oz of Centennial for 60, 1 oz of Goldings at 30, and then dry hop with 1 oz of Cascade. This was a clone recipe that I found for Harpoon IPA so I didn't want to modify it regardless of what I thought. I'll try it again after it sits for a couple more weeks.
 
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