Can an old HDPE can be used for no-chill method?

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Zeno990

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I have an HDPE plastic can originally used for cooking oil. I thought I should try the no-chill method, in which one has the boiling wort into the can to sterilize it, and then let it cool overnight before proceeding to fermentation.

Do you think such a can can be used for this purpose (can it stand the heat and not give off flavors), or do I need to buy some specialized can for this purpose? I'm going to test the cooling method with hot water tonight (I will put the can in a larger vessel to be on the safe side).
 

Calder

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Polyethylene melts at 250 F, but softens at a much lower temperature. I think the max recommended temp for fill liquid is in the region of 180 F.
 

brewit2it

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I thought the common way to do no chill was to just put the lid on your brewpot and let it cool in there. That way you will have a headstart on the settling hot break and cold break before you transfer it to the sanitized fermenter the next day.
 
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Zeno990

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This is from wikipedia:

Properties

HDPE has little branching, giving it stronger intermolecular forces and tensile strength than lower-density polyethylene. The difference in strength exceeds the difference in density, giving HDPE a higher specific strength.[2] It is also harder and more opaque and can withstand somewhat higher temperatures ([120 °C/ 248 °F for short periods, 110 °C /230 °F continuously). High-density polyethylene, unlike polypropylene, cannot withstand normally-required autoclaving conditions. The lack of branching is ensured by an appropriate choice of catalyst (e.g., Ziegler-Natta catalysts) and reaction conditions. HDPE contains the chemical elements carbon and hydrogen.


Seems like it might be worth a try.
 
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