Calcium Chloride Recall ?

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bwible

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What do you guys think? I use it for water chem adjustments in small amounts. Like a couple grams at a time. I have a small 2 oz pkg. I don’t see any chunks of anything. Just white powder. How can this be a choking hazard? Does this make sense? I thought it might be a scam but I did buy this and it does have one of those batch numbers on it.

Thanks
———————————————-
Occidental Chemical Corporation
Calcium Chloride Recall Notification

Dear Customer:

MoreFlavor! was notified of a vendor initiated recall of Food Grade Anhydrous 94-97% Calcium Chloride Pellets, manufactured by Occidental Chemical Corporation for “potential contamination with blue high density polyethylene (HDPE) fragments”. Due to the size of the fragments, the FDA has deemed this a choking hazard.

Our records indicate you have received the following units potentially covered by this recall.

WM40 - Calcium Chloride (2 oz) x 1 Invoice Date 10/01/21

For 5 lb, 1 lb and 2 oz sizes, only the following batch numbers are affected. You can find the batch number on the bottom corner of the product label.
  • 55821
  • 55806
  • 55788
At the direction of the manufacturer, we are requesting that you dispose of any unused product. Please fill out the following form to acknowledge the receipt of information regarding this recall and we will automatically issue a refund.
 
I wouldn't worry about it , but they are offering a refund, so if you think its a problem, just order some more.
 
Is it part of an affected batch number? You can dissolve it in water and make a known concentration solution then filter it if you are concerned.
 
What do you guys think? I use it for water chem adjustments in small amounts. Like a couple grams at a time. I have a small 2 oz pkg. I don’t see any chunks of anything. Just white powder.

Are you sure you're looking at the right salt? Calcium Chloride looks like little beads in the form that MoreBeer/MoreFlavor sells. A true anhydrous calcium chloride could look like a powder, but that stuff is expensive (and difficult to keep anhydrous).
 
Another great reason to make up a known concentration solution. Many salts that come anhydrous pick up water from the atmosphere and form hydrates over time.
 
Another great reason to make up a known concentration solution. Many salts that come anhydrous pick up water from the atmosphere and form hydrates over time.

You can then check the specific gravity to get a more accurate measurement of the the amount than you would by weighing prills that have absorbed water from the air.
 
This is a serious question, not snark. If you don't know the strength of the dry powder/pellet form because it may have absorbed water from the air, how is disolving it in water going to give you a known quantity or concentration?
 
This is a serious question, not snark. If you don't know the strength of the dry powder/pellet form because it may have absorbed water from the air, how is disolving it in water going to give you a known quantity or concentration?
Either by dessication of the salt before weighing (heat or more hygroscopic environment) or by estimating and then verifying via sg, freezing point, or titration. As Vikeman said, a hydrometer to measure sg would be simple.

Chart showing CaCl2 density vs. Concentration in water
 
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If you don't know the strength of the dry powder/pellet form because it may have absorbed water from the air, how is disolving it in water going to give you a known quantity or concentration?

Hydrometer.
 
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From Occidental's warning:
"Due to the size of the fragments, the FDA has deemed this a choking hazard."

If it's a choking hazard, the particles must be fairly large, at least large enough to visually notice. The particles are blue, CaCl2 is white, so the plastic won't blend in. Look inside the jar.

If it had been microplastics, it wouldn't be a choking hazard and you might not be able to see them.
 
Are you sure you're looking at the right salt? Calcium Chloride looks like little beads in the form that MoreBeer/MoreFlavor sells. A true anhydrous calcium chloride could look like a powder, but that stuff is expensive (and difficult to keep anhydrous).
You’re right, I said powder but it looks like little tiny pellets. Nothing blue visible.
 

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If it's a choking hazard, the particles must be fairly large, at least large enough to visually notice. The particles are blue, CaCl2 is white, so the plastic won't blend in. Look inside the jar.

This. You're looking for plastic chunks large enough to choke on.
 
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