Burnt Match smell Sulphur dioxide

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Virtus

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Hello. I need help. Not in every batch i get these sulphur burnt match smell, it is very unpleasant. It is not hidrogen sulphite rotten egg smell... And it wont go away if i flushed beer with co2. Even long bottle conditioning doesnt help. Usually appears after bottling. I assuming infection or yeast stress, but i am really carefull with yeast. Us 05 500g sprinkled in chilled wort 1.045 OG. If is an infection i want to know what kind of bacteria cause it? Thanks
 
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Virtus

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Batch size is cca 500l. I have a microbrewery...
 

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Virtus

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My problem is not hydrogen sulfide, but sulphur dioxide SO2. Yeast handling is ok, pitch rate to. Assuming infection while bottling in counter pressure CO2 line... I just red that you can remove SO2 with pure hydrogen peroxide. 1mL peroxide per gallon of beer to remove 10 ppm SO2. Must try that.
 

McMullan

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Batch size is cca 500l. I have a microbrewery...
Sorry, mate, but if you're running a commercial microbrewery you really ought to be explaining to us humble home brewers why you're getting a 'sulphur burnt match smell' :yes:
 
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Virtus

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I brewing beer for 10 years and i am still a homebrewer, but also running a microbrewery. The most knowledge i get as homebrewer through practice. But never meet with these kind of off flavour. I think that is in common sense to ask homebrewers about these problem, because we have a lot of practice and knowledge. If someone is pro brewer that doesnt mean that he knows everything. So would you injured your dignity and pride to ask a homebrewer about problem if you would be a pro brewer?
 

McMullan

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We have different views of what a professional is, I guess. At commercial level you really need to be advised by someone qualified to solve your problem. If not for the sake of your business then for the sake of your customers' safety. Engaging anonymous home brewers online is very risky, frankly. As is playing with chemicals. Sounds like you under pitched, either too few healthy yeast cells or 'enough' half-dead cells and possibly into wort that wasn't sufficiently fermentable. Believing otherwise based on assumptions won't solve your problem. How do you assess yeast quality and determine your pitching rate exactly? Dry yeast are usually half-dead at the best of times. You shouldn't just follow the instructions on the pack. As a professional you need to confirm prior to each pitching. If you want to stay in business, that is. What are you using as a fermentation vessel(s) and how do you manage temperature, pre- and post-pitching? It's not unusual for under-pitching issues to be exacerbated by poor pitching practices. What are your cleaning procedures? How do you sanitise? Due to scale and higher risks, standard home-brew procedures are not necessarily optimal for your situation. You should not be brewing like a home brewer, basically. You need to be following documented standard procedures at all times. Only then will you have a better chance of not getting problems like this. That is free advice. If you don't like the sound of it and decide to ignore it that's entirely up to you. Your best bet is to get advice from other commercial brewers. Any local to you? There are online forums for pro brewers too.
 
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