Building brew house in basement ( long term build) and would love opinions.

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Redpappy

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I am in the process of building a brew house in my basement. I’m curious on how much feed back I will get on how to do this with a min. amount of cash involved. If responses are good, then I will start adding pics with my ideas to and see on what others suggestions would be. Right now main concerns is ventilation and position of everything. With the set up I have started I can move things around as I build.
As of right now, I brew outside on propane, and ferment, bottle/keg in the basement.

Thanks in advance
 

day_trippr

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fwiw, the way this has worked best is for you to show how your initial concepts fit within the confines of the space you're working with, and allow the peanut gallery to provide comments and insights. The more info you provide the more feedback you'll likely receive...

Cheers!
 
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Redpappy

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Here is the space that I am working with. From left to right. Left side is stairs leading up stairs, right side is exterior wall with electric panel.
Possibly future spot for keezer.
D4757DD5-137B-4FC4-BF2D-B6635120346A.jpeg

This is my fermentor/keezer along side is my botteling table.
B5394D78-8D8D-4434-A204-76394633209A.jpeg

Cabinet/ storage of misc items.
E4773865-A2BE-4485-9DBD-EAE4669A1DED.jpeg

Empty space for now, maybe brew stand?. Pipe is dryer vent...
11A93F9A-D57A-4C53-ACDC-FA169BF11D36.jpeg

Another spot for possible brew stand? Not sure if it is to close to FB panel for brew stand???
F6971CB0-31EE-4912-91FC-149DF964EB0A.jpeg

Washing table.
977D6FC9-7BDC-4A95-9142-4339633C1B69.jpeg

Things I’m not sure about.. how close can I actually have brew stand to electric panel. Vent size? I only brew 5 gal batches.
 

AkTom

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Do you have water and drain? Water should be easy. You may need a pump for drain.
Have you considered steam slayer instead of vent?
 

day_trippr

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Looks like there's a ton of space and head room, and the window could come in handy for venting vs a steam slayer. Good start.
And, agreed, from experience, optimal drainage can be the biggest hurdle, but one can work around it with the suggested pumped system.

Cheers!
 
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Redpappy

Redpappy

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Do you have water and drain? Water should be easy. You may need a pump for drain.
Have you considered steam slayer instead of vent?
first time I have heard of a "steam slayer". i have a Spike Brewing kettle. that I have pre designed for electric brewing, but don't have a a 1 1/2 opening on the top. Not sure if I would be able/conforttable on drilling into the kettle or not... but in consideration.

Do you have the steam slayer? if so, how do you like it? Did you have to drill into your kettle to put the fitting in?
 
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Redpappy

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As far as water and drainage is concerned.... I will be able to add water(hot and cold) to my cleaning station with no issue. For drainage.i have that taken care of as well....

my knowledge.... I know enough to be dangerous.... I have the space in my electrical panel to add a 30 amp (240)circuit. I do plan on being the breaker and wire once i figure out where I need the wire to go....My kettle ( spike ) was designed for electric BIAB. With the hopes of not having to do any modifications to it.

If measurements is requested for ideas/sugggestion I can/will provide.... I will more than likely add those to the list tomorrow, to include my small window.

I have thought about using the small window to vent... but have concerns with the size. My Wife though about attaching it the dryer vent, but thinking water with lint... does not sound good to me..But would the 4inch pipe be sufficient for the vent.
 

day_trippr

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A 4" pipe would be entirely inadequate for a 3V gas-fired system like mine but for an e-BIAB I bet it'd work just fine with the right blower and minimum duct work...

[edit] ...on a separate run, of course. Definitely would not suggest sharing any exhaust system with anything else...

Cheers!
 
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Redpappy

Redpappy

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A 4" pipe would be entirely inadequate for a 3V gas-fired system like mine but for an e-BIAB I bet it'd work just fine with the right blower and minimum duct work...

[edit] ...on a separate run, of course. Definitely would not suggest sharing any exhaust system with anything else...

Cheers!
not sure if your thinking is the same, but i was thinking of lint with liquid would equal issues down the line...

What kind of blower comes to your mind... if 4 inch would work, that would be great... lot easier to get the fittings for the siding lol.
 

day_trippr

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There are all kinds of duct booster fans and "vortex" fans for 4" applications at all kinds of prices (some downright punitive!)
I'd look for at least 250 cfm (that's the unducted rating) and then try to figure out which style is least likely to have issues with moisture...

Cheers!
 

Bobby_M

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There are all kinds of duct booster fans and "vortex" fans for 4" applications at all kinds of prices (some downright punitive!)
I'd look for at least 250 cfm (that's the unducted rating) and then try to figure out which style is least likely to have issues with moisture...

Cheers!
Any blower that has the guts to do the job will be obnoxiously loud and its kind of counter to the Zen of electric quiet brewing. Also, you will be ejecting a lot of conditioned air for an hour unless the collection is done right over the pot and tuned perfectly. Steam condensing is the better way. I can weld a TC to the lid which is less cost prohibitive than shipping the kettle both ways.
 
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Franktalk

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The condenser does the job without a sound and will save energy both on your kettle and in your house. I have one on my basement system, (Spike) and it works very well. Bobby's idea of shipping the lid is good, but even if you were to ship him the kettle, (which I think is a better place to put it) it would still be cheaper than a hood and vent motor, and much quieter. Man, you gotta be able to listen to some music while you brew.
 

mongoose33

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Min cash investment is nice, but don't be so focused on the money that a year from now you're wishing you had invested just a bit more and gotten what you want.

I look back on my brewing purchases over the last 4 years and I have a lot of sunk costs that were replaced with upgrades--and I didn't get anything close to my original investment back.

So, if you can, plan for expansion, and maybe even you don't do the Cadillac model at the outset, but you allow for that in the future if resources and desire permit. For example, when I wired my garage for electric brewing, I decided to add two additional 20-amp 120V circuits, one to run my Penguin chiller, one to run the RIMS controller. That's in addition to the receptacles that were already there. Yeah, it cost a little more, but I don't blow circuit breakers overloading that one original circuit, and it's much more convenient.

When I spec'd out the wiring for the garage, I decided to put a 60-amp breaker in my original box, and use that to feed a subpanel in my garage. That sub panel allowed for a breaker for the 30-amp panel that runs my 5500-watt element in the boil kettle, the two extra 20-amp circuits--and still there were 4 empty slots. That was a good thing because I was walking through Menards one day and saw a 5000-watt garage heater on sale for $62. It dawned on me that I now have 240-v power in the garage, and I installed that heater with another 30-amp breaker. I still have two slots left--and I'm wondering if I ever get an electric car if I can simply use those two remaining slots for a circuit to charge such a car.

Point being, don't be chintzy--leave yourself room to expand, to change your mind, to alter the arrangement.

And who knows? Maybe you want a place for a keezer or kegerator, maybe a ferm chamber or two, perhaps a glycol chiller--could be anything. Whatever, my suggestion is to build capacity.

******

What's the story on water for you? My water out of the tap is terrible for brewing most things, very alkaline. So I bought an RO water system from Buckeye Hydro. I run the output line into an Aquatainer as my storage tank (7 gallons). So you may want to allow for that at some point.

******

I *can* lift that 7-gallon aquatainer, but I've had 2 back surgeries and eventually it occurred to me that I might be smarter to find a way to pump that water up into the kettle, and into water jugs I use for additional storage. I added a self-priming pump that I can use to pump from that aquatainer into the kettle or the jugs.

You can't really use a normal brewing pump for this the way I do it, as my aquatainer is on the floor, and those brewing pumps are not self-priming. I suppose if you had a storage tank for RO water high up, you could simply use gravity to drain it.

So, if at any point you're going to do RO water (maybe you already do), think on how you want that to work. My RO filter is under my sink, and it's fed by a separate valve I had the plumber install. In fact, that valve has a splitter on it, one line runs to the RO filter, the other line feeds the Steam Slayer.

******

You might also try making a list of needs and wants, and perhaps prioritize them. Lay out the arrangements to allow for the needs, but also the wants.

******

And when it comes to a sink--the cheap way is to use a plastic utility sink, but given the myriad of sink arrangements I've seen, that is only optimal if it's all you can do. If I were redoing my brew space, I'd have a wide sink cabinet, probably six feet wide, with the sink on the right side. I'd do a shallow bowl, and raise the top of the counter/sink to 40 inches.

That is fairly close to what i have. I don't have to bend over to work at that sink (it's at 40 inches high), and it's wide enough for me to lay kettles and kegs on their sides and spray them out.

And BTW--if you do the steam slayer, setting things up to accommodate it is important. I'm going to show a few pics to give you some ideas. My setup space is limited (you have a larger blank canvas), but you can see how the location of my boil kettle and sink allow for almost perfect arrangement to accommodate the steam slayer.

The Steam Slayer I use is attached to the kettle; I use a couple of 90-degree elbows to elevate that. I pre-boil water for LODO brewing and the fitting is very close to the water, so I simply elevate the Steam Slayer. You'll see on the sink that there are three lines coming out of the face of the sink area: the translucent one is a water supply line for the Steam Slayer, the white one is the output line from the RO filter, and the larger silicone hose is the drain line for the Steam Slayer--and I have it terminating in a riser connected to the sink drain.

Took me a long time to figure all this out, and some of it is borne of necessity--the sink was already in, so I have to turn a corner with the sideboard, and yet....turns out to work almost perfectly for me.

Good luck, and I wish I had had a blank canvas to work with. :)

slayer3.jpg slayer4b.jpg slayer5.jpg slayer6.jpg transferpump.jpg sink2.jpg kegsink.jpg rosystem2.jpg rosystemsupply2.jpg rowatersetup.jpg
 

OneInTheHand

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The first thing I would do is put osb or plywood up on the the wall with stairs. Also consider insulation or sound dampening material. If you get going with other construction for the brew space you don’t want to put a hole in the drywall for the stairs.

Is your dryer gas or electric? If it was gas I’d leave alone, if it was electric you might add a one way baffle an a wye close to where it exits. Probably against code though.
 

pbrennan10

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Any blower that has the guts to do the job will be obnoxiously loud and its kind of counter to the Zen of electric quiet brewing. Also, you will be ejecting a lot of conditioned air for an hour unless the collection is done right over the pot and tuned perfectly. Steam condensing is the better way. I can weld a TC to the lid which is less cost prohibitive than shipping the kettle both ways.
Keep in mind without a source of makeup air there is a potential to put a negative pressure on things like water heater vents and pull exhaust gasses into the room. Code calls for things over 300cfm (or when necessary). Since you're in a basement with a water heater and combustion byproducts generally sink I would be cautious.
 
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Redpappy

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@mongoose33 , did you drill 6our own hole o4 did you send it back to Spike?

EDIT:

to answer some of your questions,

my water is ok, but I I do a 50/50 mix and then add what I need per BrueNWater.. I have though5 about putting in a RO system, but that is on the bottom of my list.

*********

I don’t care for the lifting, so I bought cold side pump from Northernbrewer “ https://www.northernbrewer.com/products/anti-gravity-transfer-pump“ about a year ago, and finally tried it out. I liked using it on my cider, I’m not sure about my brew, i will find out in 2 weeks.

*******

For my sink I am thinking of a 60 inch counter top with the sink in the middle.( basically using base cabinets that you have in the kitchen)
 
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matt_m

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Some friends of ours used a rotary phone up until about a month ago when they ported their home number to an iPhone.
 
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Redpappy

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Some friends of ours used a rotary phone up until about a month ago when they ported their home number to an iPhone.
staying with the older technology, more power to them..... Technology has 2 effects, 1 to the positive, 2 to the negative. its so amazing watching people look at their phones so often......

on the other side of it, it is nice to have such a quick response when a loved one is in the hospital.,...

double sided coin

down side to technology it makes people stupid...... my oppoligise, but its my view points on belief. so really it all depends on the side of the coin you are on, on which you support.either answer is correct, depending on belief.


And yes, i listen to all beliefs.... Some do have good points, as well as bad points. but you can't hear the good points unless you hear it all....
 

mongoose33

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I have one question for you.......who the HELL still uses a ROTARY PHONE?
Well....I do.

I got that prior to a local house being demolished; I saw it and said "I want." I found it worked with my home's phone system so I thought it would be cool to use it as an extension in the garage.

And....it is. :)
 

mongoose33

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@mongoose33 , did you drill 6our own hole o4 did you send it back to Spike?
.
For that one, I took it back to spike for them to weld the TC port on the kettle.

I've added some TC ports to another 20-gallon kettle, and used the bulkheads that BobbyM sells at BrewHardware. All you need is the proper diameter hole.

So, rather than try to drill it myself, I took the kettle to a local metal shop, had them drill the holes for me. It's a Bayou Classic kettle, which has a somewhat thinner side wall than the spike. I wasn't comfortable trying to drill that myself--one screwup and scratch one kettle. So I had them do it.

I don't know that Spike would have worked on that one--I doubt it. After I had the holes drilled, the metalworking guy said he could have welded the TC ferrule to the kettle for me, which would maybe have been better.

Except....those bulkheads are as solid as a rock. I am not a particular fan of weldless bulkheads, but the ones at Brewhardware are amazing. I've used the TC ones as well as the 1/2" NPT ones, and they're just as solid.
 

mongoose33

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I'm going to add one more thing--I've been thinking about how I would design a brew area if I had a blank canvas with which to work. I was thinking about the kitchen work triangle, which is an approach to design the optimal kitchen work area primarily situating the refrigerator, the stove, and the sink.



The Wiki article I linked above explains this pretty well, but the keys to it are to keep things within reasonably close distance to each other, but not too close. Here are some of them:

  • No leg of the triangle should be less than 4 feet (1.2 m) or more than 9 feet (2.7 m).
  • The sum of all three sides of the triangle should be between 13 feet (4.0 m) and 26 feet (7.9 m).
  • Cabinets or other obstacles should not intersect any leg of the triangle by more than 12 inches (30 cm).
  • If possible, there should be no major traffic flow through the triangle.
  • A full-height obstacle, such as a tall cabinet, should not come between any two points of the triangle.
Besides the work triangle itself, there are several rules of thumb to consider when planning a kitchen:[3][4]

  • As measured between countertops and cabinets or appliances, work aisles should be no less than 42 inches (110 cm) for one cook, or 48 inches (120 cm) for multiple cooks.
  • A sink should have a clear counter area of at least 24 inches (61 cm) on one side, and at least 18 inches (46 cm) on the other side.
  • A refrigerator should have a clear counter area of at least 15 inches (38 cm) on the handle side; or the same on either side of a side-by-side refrigerator; or the same area on a counter no more than 48 inches (120 cm) across from the refrigerator.
  • A stove or cooktop should have a clear 15 inches (38 cm) area on one side, and at least 12 inches (30 cm) on the other side.
  • At least 36 inches (91 cm) of food preparation area should be located next to the sink.

Now, this is for a kitchen, not a brew space, but I think there are some lessons to be learned here, especially since you have that blank canvas with which to work.

Suppose you had an area that was 15 x 12 feet square. Do you want the sink on one wall and the brew area on the opposite wall 15' away? I'd think not. I'd want that sink as reasonably close to the brew area as I could get it, but not too close.

I'd be working to reduce the steps needed to traverse the space, but retaining enough space so I had countertop area available, a drainboard area next to the sink, etc. etc.

If you refer to the pic below, you can see how my space is set up.

(and for those inspecting the space with a critical eye, it's a working space--I have all the stuff I've cleaned lying next to the sink, the pump is disassembled for inspection and any necessary cleaning [none needed as it turns out], and I took that pic without cleaning up the whole space first. :) ).

From the left side of the mash tun on the left to the wall behind the sink, it's about 8.5 feet. I could even move the kettles closer together if I needed to, but the spacing allows me to swap hoses around without having the use different hoses. The distance along the back wall of the sink to the white rolling cabinet is about 6 feet. So, my basic brewing area is 6 x 8.5 feet.

Nothing is more than about 2 steps from anything else, and most of the time, it's a step or within easy reach. Labels help with me getting things back where they belong.

If I had that blank canvas, I'd have a stainless table or base cabinet or something coming off the white cabinet on the right, behind me, so that I had a "U-shaped" space. I'd do my water addition measuring there, testing ph, my other stuff would be there. As it is, I have a small table I set up for those purposes, use the small shop stool to sit at that table and record info in my notebook, do my measuring, etc.

What this all means (as I think this through), is that I could have a very functional, very efficient, brew space in an area that would be maybe 8 x 9 feet, maybe 8 x 8.

Here's the wide angle pic of the whole area:

brewspacewideangle2.jpg



Here's a closeup showing things I've figured out over time that make the space more efficient for me.

brewareacloseup.jpg


A: I have a bunch of little tip-forward bins I store parts in. Got them free from Menards on some sort of rebate thing, but they're perfect for everything from silicone gaskets to posts to end caps to...everything.

B: Same bins. The microwave, which I use to boil water to sanitize my oxygenating wand, has to sit exactly where it is due to the brackets holding the shelves. So some bins on one side, some on the other.

C: I even mounted some on the wall next to the pegboard. I've got some spare quick disconnects in one of them, some gelatin packets I use when making finings, etc. Nice thing about these bins is even if labeled as some are, I can see what's in them.

D: Hard to show well here, but there are two aluminum....prongs that I made attached to the underside of the shelves. That's where I store my hydrometers, long thermometers, poor-man's bottle filling attachment. Up and out of the way, but easily accessible.

E: Everybody needs a paper-towel dispenser handy, right?

F: (on the bottom), the rolling cabinet on the right; it functions the same as if I had counter space to the right of the sink.


If I had that blank canvas, I wouldn't go any wider than about 8 feet, and I wouldn't go any deeper than about 8 feet.

Further, I'd start with the placement of the sink--since that often is predetermined by drains and pipes and such--and build out from there. The other issue would be dealing with steam. Vent hood? Steam slayer? That is the other main issue.

Anyway, enough blathering. This should give you some things to think on w/r/t how and where you place things, AND how many steps you want to take to move around the brew area. For me, I want fewer steps.
 
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Redpappy

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@mongoose33 , I was out brewing a Blue moon today, in which it brought up a question. Since it seems that our kettles are very similar I thought I would see how you handle the bag with the heating element....Do you use a false bottom? My set up currently is with a Wilser bag, and I try to be very carefully if I have to heat up the mash temp ( like today, temp dropped to 148 after I added my grains)

Not only am I working with a blank canvas, but I am also going from propane to Electric. This is a project that will be taking me a few years to do.

I have to do some measurements, but I think my currant brew stand will still work for me. If it does, that will help out a lot, since it does have wheels....I may need to make some adjustment to my lift, but that should still be doable. In that case I will be able to roll it where I need it to go, since everything else should be easily disconnected.

Now to answer some questions of yours..

As of right now, everything is able to move to a different location, so far I have already moved my keeper/ferment twice. Along with your thoughts, I am looking at where to place my sink.

As far as drainage is concern, I do have a few options. Since majority of the time it will be just water(i.e. from my chiller or steam slayer)/gray water, i can run it to my sump pump. With that, I am also thinking if i do need the waste water to go to the septic system I can just (for now) have it go into a bucket that I can poor into my floor drain (which goes to my septic system). I have not purchased my water lines as of yet, just because I need to figure out where the sink is going. One of the issues I keep running into is the placement of my electric outlet for my Kettle, along with my sink.

I will see about bringing my brew table down to get some pictures if the size will work, along with my measurements for ideas.
 

mongoose33

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@mongoose33 , I was out brewing a Blue moon today, in which it brought up a question. Since it seems that our kettles are very similar I thought I would see how you handle the bag with the heating element....Do you use a false bottom? My set up currently is with a Wilser bag, and I try to be very carefully if I have to heat up the mash temp ( like today, temp dropped to 148 after I added my grains)
I'm not using a bag. The kettle on the right is the BK. I heat strike water in that, transfer to the mash tun on the left using the pump. I recirculate

I'm doing LODO techniques and I built the system to avoid doing the BIAB thing as there's an issue with keeping O2 out as you drain the bag. I miss the days of BIAB, so simple and easy. The recirculation through a RIMS tube allows me to control mash temps to a single degree, and I can do ramps and such.

So, no bag, no false bottom in the boil kettle. Just the element.

Not only am I working with a blank canvas, but I am also going from propane to Electric. This is a project that will be taking me a few years to do.
After a while I forget where I've said what, in what threads. I put in a 60-amp breaker in my main electrical box and ran wire to a sub panel in my garage. From that I can wire anything I want, added two 20-amp 120v circuits, a 30-amp circuit for the control panel for the boil element, and even a 30-amp circuit for a garage heater.

Electric has been great. I brewed last weekend with temps in the 20s outside, but in the garage, 55-60 degrees. Steam captured by Bobby M's steam slayer, garage warmed by the garage heater. Propane was a pain; had to open a window and use a fan to eject steam, then had a propane heater in front of the service door which I had to open a crack to provide makeup air. That was back in my BIAB days.

I have to do some measurements, but I think my currant brew stand will still work for me. If it does, that will help out a lot, since it does have wheels....I may need to make some adjustment to my lift, but that should still be doable. In that case I will be able to roll it where I need it to go, since everything else should be easily disconnected.
A wheeled stand will let you make adjustments as you go. It's taken me a while to get my space to where it works most efficiently for me; anything that lets you make tweaks is probably a good idea.

Now to answer some questions of yours..

As of right now, everything is able to move to a different location, so far I have already moved my keeper/ferment twice. Along with your thoughts, I am looking at where to place my sink.

As far as drainage is concern, I do have a few options. Since majority of the time it will be just water(i.e. from my chiller or steam slayer)/gray water, i can run it to my sump pump. With that, I am also thinking if i do need the waste water to go to the septic system I can just (for now) have it go into a bucket that I can poor into my floor drain (which goes to my septic system). I have not purchased my water lines as of yet, just because I need to figure out where the sink is going. One of the issues I keep running into is the placement of my electric outlet for my Kettle, along with my sink.

I will see about bringing my brew table down to get some pictures if the size will work, along with my measurements for ideas.
I think water and drainage are your largest issues. I wish I had a floor with epoxy on it and a trench drain so I could either squeegee or spray down at the end of brewing. As it is, I use a mop.

Fun watching you work all this out.
 

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My Wife though about attaching it the dryer vent said:
I just built out a space that is almost identical. Let me look for my drawings. Initially, I tried to combine the dryer and brewery into a single 6" vent, but the moisture and lint make both vents less than optimal. I added a separate 4" for the dryer and kept the 6" for the brewery.
 

kwilson16

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I use MS Power Point to do a lot of planning and thinking and brainstorming. I attached the pdf. Send me your email if you want and can use the .ppt file.
 

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Redpappy

Redpappy

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Today was slightly busy for me. I picked up some lumber to do a temp wall.. but forgot to pick up a 2x4x8 for top seal.... so the wall will have to wait for now.

Thank you for your input @moongoose33. I did do some measurements and the distance between the sink and keezer /fermentor is pretty far, about 21 feet. I have given this some thought, my brew stand is on wheels, so I will be able to just roll it over to where I will be fermenting without a lot of hassle.
The two things that I am working on right now is water ( sink), and lighting. I just finished wiring up two outlets and switch ( switch not complete yet but wire is there) to run 3 led shop lights. It took me a while to figure out the placement of the lights.

As far as water is concern, part of the reason for my temp wall is to attach my water lines to, as well as a drain. Since 90% of the time it will be just water, and maybe some soap, I will be draining it into my sump pump. For anything that has chunkies, I will either be putting that into a bucket to carry outside, or to drain that goes to my septic.
Hopefully my pics will show the way I attended them to... this is what I am calling my brew station ( moveable brew stand and sink area). From left to right. The first 2x4 is possible going to be a wall, but it will be the edge of my brew stand. The next 2x4 is the beginning of the temp wall, next 2x4 is my cabinet ( I will be adding a 24”,30”, and 24” inch base cabinet) the last 2x4 is the end of the temp wall. Tape on the table indicates the break between the cabinets.
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I am thinking of adding peg board to the wall, and maybe a shelf, not sure though. One of the things I am not looking into doing is making this a finished brew room. Call me strange, but I do like the unfinished look.

I also did a slight improvement to my keezer(5.2 CF), I got some pipe and added a different fan for circulation . I will add my questions for this at the end of the post...
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Here are a few questions I have, and hopefully can get some feed back on.

1, I will start with my keezer/fermentor. The fan I installed is a 12V fan, however the plug that I have it connected to is only a 5V. Where/ howcould I get a 10V dc plug from? I do feel it pulling the cold air up, but I think if it was running a little faster it would be more efficient.

2. For the steam slayer, would it be advisable to add a shut off valve that is esaely accessible for it? Silly question I know, but opinions are nice.

With my kettle being so close to my electric panel, I am debating on putting up a finished wall between kettle with a steam slayer and electric panel or leaving it open.

even though I am somewhat comfortable with doing electric work, I may be looking at hiring an electrician to wire up my 30 amp 240 circuit for my brewery. ( even though it is only about 3 feet) just because I need a 30 Amp 240 circuit for my Generator circuit/ and if my thinking is right, I can use it to run a 120V30Amp camper circuit. So it would be a total of 2 circuits at 30 Amp for about 100 feet of wire.

3. has anyone done epoxy to a floor after the layed laminate ( without glue)? With me being in the basement, I will be laying laminate down before I put my cabinets on the floor, to help preserve the cabinets.
 
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Redpappy

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More I thought about this, I have decided to start with my sink and go from there on my build. I got my temp wall, cabinets, sink, installed. Having water is so nice. No more going up and down stairs with a 5 gal bucket to bring water down stairs to do my cleaning. I do plan on putting up a back splash ( https://www.lowes.com/pd/48-in-x-8-ft-Embossed-White-Wall-Panel/1000174771) just in case i do something goofy and splash water. When I did my cold water I added a T, so that I can have one valve for my sink, and one for a hose bibb. I was considering just putting in a 1/4, but figured I could not add to it. So I went with the hose bibb, and if I do need anther line, i could just add a Y to it. (thanks for the idea @mongoose33). I figured for the most part, I will be just dumping water, and maybe a little bit of soap down the drain, so I took my sink drain and ran it to my sump pump. For now, all my yeast cake and trubb will either be carried outside in a bucket or i will dump it in a drain that goes to my septic.

Now that I have my water in, my next project is figuring out my electric. Before I start running my wire, I am looking at controllers. I am kinda stuck on this, just because I'm not sure If i should go with a table top controller (https://www.auberins.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=64_65&products_id=770) or a wall mounted. If I go with a mounted, i think i will need to add another small portion to my temp wall, going from the existing one over to my center beam, roughly adding 24" to the wall. That way I have the space to mount it.

IMG_1282.jpg IMG_1283.jpg
This is the space that will eventually be my brew stand(movable) and where my electric for my controller will be going.
IMG_1284.jpg
 
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Redpappy

Redpappy

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I got my electric outlet put in, and everything needed to start brewing indoors. Got to love the OT...Sometimes. I am planning to redesign my brew stand to fit my needs, but for now, I will be using my old one that I used for propane. I am thinking of dropping my (what I call) crane by 6 inches, just so that it will be a little bit easier to drop my bag when i am done squeezing it.
The steam slayer wide body is working like a charm, water is a little brown, no real smell that I was thinking (from what i have read). From the humidity reading, my basement only rose 3% during the entire process(from mash to fermentor). and most of it was from when I added my IC.

Im a little torn on what the next project should be. As of right now, i can brew in my basement with what I have. I am considering getting a RO system ( talking with Russ (buckeye_hydro))
 

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