BruControl Uniflex v2: Adding Devices

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swanwick

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@RonBurgundy10 started a great thread about his Uniflex set-up. Since the v2 has some subtle differences, I thought folks might be able to learn from both threads, but also keep them mentally separate for the few differences.

I was missing the antenna and @BrunDog puts out a lot of warnings about not turning it on without the antenna so I waited until Pete could send a replacement. I have the dual power option, but my interpretation of that was that you could use the 15-P if you did not need the elements and otherwise all the power would derive form the 30A plug. Wrong. Took me a while to figure out that the 15P plug is needed for everything in the unit except the elements (I think).

Setting up the network: while not super-intuitive, the instructions were pretty decent for this. I have a few smart devices made by Esspressif so that confused me for a while, but eventually worked that out, got uniflex connected to network and laptop connected to uniflex.

The use of the different pins mapping to a whole different set of ports is a bit confusing, but certainly fine to add each device and select its port based on the mapping on page 15 in the Uniflex Product Notes. The pumps were easy enough to create. I am starting with button controls and then will build scripting once I have the pushbuttons all working. I am going to write a reply on this thread for each of the issues I am having, but here is the summary
  1. Only some of the ball valves are responding
  2. Not finding all 3 of the probes
  3. Not sure what devices are needed to run the elements
 
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swanwick

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I have two pumps, three 1-wire temp probes, and two 5500 watt elements that plug into the uniflex directly. I have 9 digital ball valves, 1 proportional ball valve, 1 volume sensor, 1 float switch, 1 external 24v power source that all need to be wired into the 24 pin connector. I wired everything up using a large control block for all the grounds and a smaller control block for the external power to power the volume sensor, the proportional valve, and pins 1, 2, 3 on the connector. Note, I still don't really understand why it needs power going to 3 different pins. Couldn't the uniflex just derive the power it needs from one of those pins?

I started creating devices. The pumps worked pretty smoothly. Next I worked on the digital ball valves. Started by looking up the pins I am using and then mapping to the ports assigned to those pins. Some were working and some were not so I just created devices for all the output ports. I am using quick disconnects so I tested the wire from one of the working ball valves. I plugged it into the non-working ones and then they worked on that port....not a ball valve issue. The ports that are working are 14, 15, 19, 32. The ones I am using that are not working are 4, 7, 23, 18, 0. NOTE: port 19 seems to map to two different pins: 8 and 18. That seems wrong.

Tomorrow I am going to confirm that the non-working ports have their pins properly connected, but this seems like way too many non-working items for that to be the problem. The non-working pins seem to come from bank 2. Anyone know how the banks work? Maybe if my power source is not connected properly to pins 1, 2, and 3 would that mean a whole bank is not powered?
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UPDATE: Ughhhhhh. After a lot of combinations of troubleshooting, I eventually figured out the pattern of why some of my valves were working and some were not. All my grounds are going into a connected terminal block. Some of the ground wires did not have enough wire stripped off such that the block was contacting a covered part of the wire.
 
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swanwick

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Temp probes: from the instructions it seems that one should pick ports in the 200's. I picked the first 3 ports: 200, 201, 202. At first, I did not realize that "sensor index" was a thing so I left the default. All three were reading the same temp. After some testing, I figured out which probe they were tracking. After reading the instructions some more, I realized about sensor index. I left 200 as index 0, I changed 202 to index 3 and it began working. 201 did not seem to work on index 1 or 2. Will try a bit more troubleshooting tomorrow. Is there any rhyme or reason to the matching of ports and index? How is the uniflex assigning the sensor index to the probes?

UPDATE:
I re-created the probe devices with
  • port 200 index 0
  • port 201 index 1
  • port 202 index 2
and now they seem to be working
 
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Thanks for posting some of your experience... no doubt we can always make documentation easier!

Interesting that you started building Device Elements from scratch - nothing against doing that, but we do have some pre-configured configurations for the UniFlex to get you started and testing. Might be easier to start from there, then modify and add as needed. Will try to answer/comment on all your notes here:

1. Yes, for the dual power option, all the unit's power, logic, and accessory/pumps run from the NEMA 5-15P plug. Only the heating elements' power comes via the NEMA x-30P plug.
2. "different pins mapping to a whole different set of ports is a bit confusing"... fair enough. This occured because we prioritized physical wiring order, not software wiring order.
3. "Only some of the ball valves are responding" would need to debug these one at a time to figure out why. "Not sure what devices are needed to run the elements" this depends on the operation you are looking for and the type of SSR you ordered. Again, this is where the pre-made configuration can help you. But, generally speaking, for Mash, you want to use PID, and check "Proportional Output" for proportional SSRs. For Boil, you want to use Duty Cycle for regular SSRs and PWM Output for proportional SSRs.
4. "why it needs power going to 3 different pins". This is because the combination of driver output currents available can allow more current than a single pin can handle. So by default, we recommend that you wire them all together. If you KNOW your total max output current is less than the max capacity of a single pin (8A), then you can wire just the one pin. By wiring all three, the input current can handle ~24A. In your circumstance, you might be able to get away with it assuming the valves use much less than an amp of current each.
5. Regarding the pins/ports that aren't working... port 4 should map to pin 6, there is no port 7, port 23 should map to pin 9, port 18 should map to pin 19, port 0 should map to pin 17. Port 19 maps to pin 8, not 18 (I see we have an error in the manual!). Pin 18 is linked to port 16.

Hope that helps!
 
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swanwick

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Product note fixed online - thanks for pointing out the port 19 mismatch!
Pete, one more possible issue in documentation.... On the port mapping sheet (page 15), pin 20 is said to map to N/A. On the pin sheet (page 20), pin 20 is said to map to port 3.
 
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3. "Only some of the ball valves are responding" would need to debug these one at a time to figure out why. "Not sure what devices are needed to run the elements" this depends on the operation you are looking for and the type of SSR you ordered. Again, this is where the pre-made configuration can help you. But, generally speaking, for Mash, you want to use PID, and check "Proportional Output" for proportional SSRs. For Boil, you want to use Duty Cycle for regular SSRs and PWM Output for proportional SSRs.
Thanks @BrunDog for the multiple point response. I have a binary SSR. I used the 3V_binarySSR pre-config, but I don't remember seeing an interlock element on that screen. It just had alarms, timers, and graphs.

I have solved issues #1 (ball valves) and #2 (temp probes) from my original post. The resolutions are added as UPDATES to each detailed post on that issue (above). Slowly, but surely getting closer to actual brewing. Sometimes easy to forget that is the actual end goal. :)

Onto #3 (the elements) There is no choice for an "interlock element" in the brucontrol device setup. Do I create a deadkband control on each of the uniflex ports 26 and 27 for element 1 and 2 interlocks? Then I just create a PID device and use one of the probes as the input. Until I write some scripts, it is up to me to make sure I have the right interlock on before engaging the PID with a target?
 
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Figured I would move some water around until the elements are working. Everything was testing out fine. Tightening up some connections and confirming all the hoses/pumps accomplish what they are supposted to. In the process, I stumbled upon issue #4: proportional ball valve. All the regular motorized valves squeak for about 3 seconds as they transition between open and closed.

The proportional ball valve (on port 32, wired to pin 23) is a different brand so could act differently, but it is just making a quick little whir and does not seem to be letting water through. The PWM output element asks for an output value. I am thinking that is in volts so tried values 0-10, but nothing seemed to work.
 
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I’ll check that configuration but it should have an interlock. There is no “interlock” element - it is made as a digital output with a dual-throw property for the other relay. This ensures only one is on at a time.

PWM outputs range 0-255. For the UniFlex’s analog output, this will result in an output that is 0-10V. You can use calibrations to change 0-255 to 0-100% or whatever else you like. Please take a look at the BruControl User Manual for details.
 
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I uninstalled and re-installed the entire software package to get back to the original configuration. I must have deleted the interlock item from the workspace at some point. It is back now that I have started over. Also, understanding the calibration now. Proportional ball valve now squealing as expected. The proportional BV is absolutely necessary for my march pump. Way too powerful at full open.

A ton of great progress today. Ran lots of manual tests, tefloned up leaks, labelled all wires, and started to bundle some. Everything electric seems to be working properly.

Tomorrow's plan is to finish bundling/hanging wires, install/test the volume sensor, and start iterating with some scripting. eg. a check for min volume before turning on element. Might be able to swing a first brew this weekend.
 
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Hear you on that. Started playing with the scripting today and ran a bunch of partial brew day sequences. Really complicated to get all the steps right without any scripting! Seemed easier with my old brew rig when I had to move the hoses around. :)

I tried the float switch outside the MT and it seemed to be changing state in the element on the workspace. But, then after I left it in a steamy simulated mash environment, it seemed to stop working. :( Bought another one in case it was defective. Any suggestions on what else to try? I suppose I could try it in a different pin and then create the device on the new port to see if that makes a difference. This is the device Amazon.com: Elecall 4"Float Switch Stainless Steel Tank Water Level Sensor 110V ES10010 Wire Length 12inch : Industrial & Scientific

I noticed that it says 110V. Could it be sending a high digital spike that is blowing out the pin? Don't want to try another pin if that is the case.
 
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Volume sensor calibration: my volume sensor was WAY off from the default multiplier suggested in the calibration sheet. I ended up at .1664 to get it to match the volume I had dumped into the vessel. I suppose it makes sense since it is actually measuring water height. Thus the vessel diameter will determine the multiplier. But, then the instructions call for a linear offset post multiplication. I read the whole A point and B point thing in the manual and understand how the slope is going to move a non-zero A point, but then shouldn't we just re-calibrate the A point with the new multiplier and then minimally re-calibrate the multiplier rather than adding a post-multiplier linear offset?

Also, at what temp water do you suggest calibrating? I understand that water increases 4% volume from cold to near boil. I seemed to be experiencing closer to 6% increase. In the past, I have done physical water level measurements (via sight glass) from my HLT at strike temp so seems I should probably be calibrating at that temp.
 
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Hear you on that. Started playing with the scripting today and ran a bunch of partial brew day sequences. Really complicated to get all the steps right without any scripting! Seemed easier with my old brew rig when I had to move the hoses around. :)

I tried the float switch outside the MT and it seemed to be changing state in the element on the workspace. But, then after I left it in a steamy simulated mash environment, it seemed to stop working. :( Bought another one in case it was defective. Any suggestions on what else to try? I suppose I could try it in a different pin and then create the device on the new port to see if that makes a difference. This is the device Amazon.com: Elecall 4"Float Switch Stainless Steel Tank Water Level Sensor 110V ES10010 Wire Length 12inch : Industrial & Scientific

I noticed that it says 110V. Could it be sending a high digital spike that is blowing out the pin? Don't want to try another pin if that is the case.

This float switch is just that... a switch. So there is no voltage that applies here (what they are saying is 110V is the limit before it starts to do bad things).

What type of input are you using? The inputs are DIRECTLY tied to the microcontroller, and these have such low impedance that on their own, will act as antennas and pick up ultra small signals, effectively reading electromagnetic noise. To make sure the input is reading one signal or another, it is a good idea to use a resistor to put it there during the open circuit phase. For example, a pull-down resistor. To do this, the switch has one leg tied to 3.3V, the other tied to the UF input pin. Also tied to that input pin is a resistor, say 10k ohm, the other side of which is tied to ground. This will ensure that while the float switch is open, the UF input pin sees ground. When it is closed, the input pin sees 3.3V (active high signal). The resistor is of sufficient value that it does not cause a short or overheating in it when it is tied across ground and 3.3V with the switch closed.

Alternatively (and hella easier) is to use the internal microcontroller pull-up function. When setting the input, use the "Active Low" parameter. This will ask the microcontroller to use it's internal pull-up resistor. In this case, the switch is wired between ground and the input pin. When the switch is closed, the UF will see ground, and when open, will see it's own 3.3V through its pull-up resistor. Review the manual for details. Hope that helps!
 
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Volume sensor calibration: my volume sensor was WAY off from the default multiplier suggested in the calibration sheet. I ended up at .1664 to get it to match the volume I had dumped into the vessel. I suppose it makes sense since it is actually measuring water height. Thus the vessel diameter will determine the multiplier. But, then the instructions call for a linear offset post multiplication. I read the whole A point and B point thing in the manual and understand how the slope is going to move a non-zero A point, but then shouldn't we just re-calibrate the A point with the new multiplier and then minimally re-calibrate the multiplier rather than adding a post-multiplier linear offset?

Also, at what temp water do you suggest calibrating? I understand that water increases 4% volume from cold to near boil. I seemed to be experiencing closer to 6% increase. In the past, I have done physical water level measurements (via sight glass) from my HLT at strike temp so seems I should probably be calibrating at that temp.
I think the sensor may be slightly different between earlier iterations the vendor made - this may be the reason for the initial difference. I recommend an offset first, then multiplier, but if you find other ways that work better for you... go for it. Ideally, a lookup table will probably give you the best results in case the sensor isn't entirely linear.

I'd calibrate at the temps you are going to use it at... say mash temp.
 
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Alternatively (and hella easier) is to use the internal microcontroller pull-up function. When setting the input, use the "Active Low" parameter. This will ask the microcontroller to use it's internal pull-up resistor. In this case, the switch is wired between ground and the input pin. When the switch is closed, the UF will see ground, and when open, will see it's own 3.3V through its pull-up resistor. Review the manual for details. Hope that helps!
I will try switching to "Active Low". My wiring for the float is already pin 11 and ground so that could be my problem. Should it have been pin 11 and external 24v power without the active low? I'll play around with that tomorrow.
 
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ABSOLUTELY NOT! 24V will destroy the microcontroller in the UniFlex. 3.3V is the max.

That said, that wiring is an active low configuration - leave it alone but add the "active low" switch in the Digital Input.
 
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OK, good thing I didn't have time to get adventurous with it today. :) I did have time to try the active low with the existing pin 11 and ground configuration. Still no response. I have another float switch coming tomorrow. Will try with that to see if something wrong with the float switch. Will also try the other available input pins if that does not work.

For the volume sensor, I was thinking that my delta on the multiplier could be due to the 1k and 2k resistors in the circuit. Suppose it doesn't matter as long as it calibrates properly. Going to take the time to dump a quart at a time and get the calibration just right. Will have to do it slowly to keep the temp at mash level. :)
 
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Have tried multiple pins and the active low config change. Also tried newly delivered float switch. None are working. Any suggestions for how to test? Everything else is working, including the motorized ball valves which are running off the internal power. External 24v power is just going to pins 2, 3, and 14. Nothing that could have blown out the internal power.
 
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For a two element 30a system (where only one element can be used at a time) do folks use two different brucontrol PID elements, each wth their own preconfigured temp probe input and then use the interlock to switch which is active? Or do you have one PID and use the software to change the input probe based on which side of the interlock is in play?
 
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Have tried multiple pins and the active low config change. Also tried newly delivered float switch. None are working. Any suggestions for how to test? Everything else is working, including the motorized ball valves which are running off the internal power. External 24v power is just going to pins 2, 3, and 14. Nothing that could have blown out the internal power.

If you have external power on 2, 3, and 14, (and no jumper on pin 1), then the valve signals are running on external power. This is good - I just wanted to clarify.
For a two element 30a system (where only one element can be used at a time) do folks use two different brucontrol PID elements, each wth their own preconfigured temp probe input and then use the interlock to switch which is active? Or do you have one PID and use the software to change the input probe based on which side of the interlock is in play?
You can't have two of the same element types address the same port. You can have two different element types address the same port though. So you will need to do the latter in your question.

That said, you shouldn't need two different PID's - just change the target temperature. Can do this manually or via script. Also, generally, you would use a PID for the mash (referencing the temp probe) but only Duty Cycle (or PWM) for the boil (no temp probe).
 
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Have tried multiple pins and the active low config change. Also tried newly delivered float switch. None are working. Any suggestions for how to test? Everything else is working, including the motorized ball valves which are running off the internal power. External 24v power is just going to pins 2, 3, and 14. Nothing that could have blown out the internal power.

OK, we messed up... we did a test and got wonky results on port 39. Dug in a little further and realized the pull-up resistor was not working (hence 'Active Low' didn't activate the internal pull-up)... and that is because on the ESP32, GPIO (aka BruControl ports) #34-39, which are inputs only, do not have internal pull-up resistors possible. Only GPIO which can be outputs have pull-ups which can be used.

So that said, our mistake. You will need external pull-up resistors to make the float switches work. Wire one end of the float to ground, the other to the input pin. Also to the same input pin, wire a 10k-ohm resistor, the other side of which to 3.3V (and not any higher!). Now as easy as that sounds, unfortunately there is no easy access to 3.3V coming from the UniFlex, so you would need to provide it. This can be done with a simple module, but like all the integration you are learning, takes wiring and space, etc.

An example module could be: Anmbest 10 Pack 3 Pins AMS1117-3.3 DC 4.75V-12V to 3.3V Voltage Regulator Step Down Power Supply Buck Module 800mA : Electronics. These can only take 12V input max, so you could wire one to pin 1 on the I/O connector (which will have internal 12V on it). Alternatively, and better IMO, would be a banger like this guy: HiLetgo 2pcs LM2596 Adjustable DC-DC Step Down Buck Power Convert Module 4.0-40V Input to 1.25-37V Output with LED Voltmeter Display : Electronics. That one has screw terminals to make your wiring easier, an adjustable output with display so you don't need a voltmeter. You would wire this to your external power supply (24VDC IIRC), and set the output to 3.3V (or a tad less). Then wire the resistors to the output per above. BTW, always insulate all wires (like resistor wires) and do your wiring with the power OFF.
 
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swanwick

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Appreciate the testing on your end. No problem with doing a little more wiring....better than having to send the whole thing back for modifications. Just glad to know that there is a path to working.

Given your "always insulate" suggestion, I am supposing that I should not plug the resistor into the pin directly even if i insulate the connection on the other side.. I did that for my voltage divider on the volume sensor. Will instead put the resistors in the middle and cover the whole thing with heat shrink tubing.

A "tad less" voltage is 3.2v or more like 3.0v?

Also, from a learning perspective....I get why the pin needs the external power (since it does not have its own) in order to be able to create a delta via the float switch "pulse". Not understanding what purpose the 10k-'ohm resistor serves though.
 
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Insulation up to you. I like heat shrink around the exposed/unterminated portion of the resistor wire.

3.0V is good.

The pin, acting as a digital input does not need external power per se. It is a very high impedance path through that pin... say on the orders of mega-ohms. At such high impedance, it is simply "seeing" voltage. And when it is floating, meaning there is no definitive path to ground or path to 3.3V (this is a binary system, so one or the other), it will just pick up noise, like an antenna. So it will flip-flop between on and off just by the electromagnetic noise around it. When you tie that pin to 3.3V or to ground, it will absolutely only see that high or low signal. So you use a resistor to tie it to either of those, it will see that signal as the default state. You then "override" it with the path to the other signal (aka your float switch to ground). The resistor has to be of low enough resistance value to provide enough voltage to the input (again, since its impedance is millions of ohms, a 10,000 ohm resistor will work nicely), but be of high enough resistance to prevent a short-circuit when the float switch is closed. If the resistance were zero ohms, it will "pull-up" the voltage to the pin, but then cause a high-current overload in the path to ground when the float switch closes. At 10k ohms, the current through it at 3.3v potential will be less than a milli-amp. That said, the 10k isn't critical. If you already have 1k or 2k resistors, you can use one of those.
 
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OK, parts on order. Will report back after receiving, wiring up, and configuring. I purchased a multi-pack of resistors (when I needed the 1k and 2k so I do have a 10k. Will use that. Was just curious about the reasoning. Get it a bit better now. Thx.
 
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@BrunDog the voltage reducer arrived. I wired it with 24v to in+ and ground to in-. Then out- to ground and out+ through 10k resistor to pin. Before I attached it to the pin, I powered it up and used the button inputs to lower what it was showing on the LED readout to 3.0. Then powered back down and attached to the pin.

The pin has a wire twisted combo of the out+ from the voltage reducer (with resistor) and one of the wires from float. The other wire from float goes to ground.

I tested it with two different float switches
I tested it in pin 11 and 22 (changing the element in the interface correspondingly)
I tested it with active low and without active low.

No combo of those seemed to work.

Thoughts on how to test further or adjust configuration?
 
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Sorry,
I don't understand what this means: "The pin has a wire twisted combo of the out+ from the voltage reducer (with resistor) and one of the wires from float."

Should be like this:

1653095910500.png
 
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There are actually two grounds for the regulator. One for the input side and one for the output side. I have both attached to ground. Your diagram makes it appear like there is one.

The rest is what I have. Instead of putting the wire coming out of the resistor and the wire coming from the float switch into a 4 item terminal block and then taking one wire out the other side to the pin.....I just twisted those two wires together and shoved them into the uniflex pin.
 
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OK if the regulator has two grounds. Tie them together and to the central ground like you did. What is the digital input element reading?

Do you have a volt meter by chance? It would be good to measure the voltage at the pin to see if it is 3.0V in one state and 0V in the other (float switch triggered).
 
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OK, finally got some time to get back to working on this. I had two problems.
  1. I had it wired backwards. In's should have been out and outs should have been in. Stupid mistake
  2. There were no instructions with the voltage device HiLetgo 2pcs LM2596 Adjustable DC-DC Step Down Buck Power Convert Module 4.0-40V Input to 1.25-37V Output with LED Voltmeter Display : Electronics. . After pressing the two buttons in different configurations, I figured out the interface. Or, at least I thought I did. A long press puts it into configuration mode. I assumed that meant you are setting the desired output voltage. You are not. After reading some of the comments on Amazon, I learned the buttons are just a calibration setting. The instructions are actually: a) read the voltage level coming out of the device b) use the buttons to match that voltage c) turn the set screw to get the voltage to where you want it.
If I had not made mistake #1 and then learned about mistake #2 before re-wiring it, I would have sent far greater than 3.3v to the uniflex, blown something out, and probably had to send the whole thing back for repair. Super lucky. If voltage reduction is a workaround that other Uniflex users may need, might be a good idea to put this warning in the Uniflex instructions.

Anyway, bottom line is that I got the float switch to work without blowing anything up. :ban:

Now, onto scripting and testing. Perhaps first brew next weekend.
 
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I have a dual element uniflex v2. I am trying to understand the element controls and how the scripting relates to them. The workspace seems to have the interlock control that switches between ports 26 and 27. The PID then operates on Port 33 and will drive whichever port is selected through thte interlock control.
  1. For dual element setups, I see scripts using two PID devices. This would make sense so that they can each have a different input (temp probe) and output (element). But the output is controlled by the interlock. Do both PID's point at port 33? When I try to create a second PID, "PID Control Device" is not one of the options on port 33. But the existing PID is showing that as its type.
  2. Other people's scripts seem to be using a Duty Output device in addition to the PID devices. Why? Will these interact with the interlock in the same way. eg. they will do nothing unless their side of the interlock is on? Or, are these devices the "manual override" that the instructions say to watch out for?
Thx.
 
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swanwick

swanwick

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I noticed that in @BrunDog script he seems to have 3 devices to run his element. I know it is RIMS rather than HERMS, but should be same principle....I think.
"RIMS Heat PID" Enabled = false
"RIMS Heat Duty" Enabled = false
"RIMS High Power" Enabled = true

No idea what the "High Power" is doing differently than the Heat Duty at 100%.
 
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Don't follow my script - my personal rig is different than the UF.

Yes, the interlock determines where power goes: to either one of two high power outputs (e.g. vessels). Set it where you want it (or off), then enable the controlling Device Element for it. If you want a PID (e.g. automatic control), then use a PID. If you want a Duty Cycle (e,g. manual control), then use a duty cycle. You can't create more than one type of Device Element on a given port. So if you wanted a PID for both, then use the same PID, and change its parameters in your script. Makes sense?
 
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swanwick

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@BrunDog (or anyone else scripting with Uniflex), I am still struggling with three things related to the elements in my scripts
  1. I cannot see in the manual how (within a script) to flip the Element Interlock from #1 to #2.
  2. When I turn on a Heat Duty device coded to one of the ports that the Element Interlock is controlling, it disables the Element Interlock. How can I turn an element on full bore and still use the safety of the Element Interlock?
  3. Per @BrunDog previous post, I should use a single PID device to control the two elements and "change the input value" since only one can be on at a time. How do I change the input value? The instructions say 'Input Device' and that works through the device interface, but I am struggling with what the syntax is for the scripting. I tried all kinds of variations like "PID Control" InputDevice = "HLT Temp" and "PID Control" InputPortID = 201 but nothing seemed to work.
Thx for the help.
 

swimIan

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3. Try this. Substitute PID for the name of your device.

“PID” Enabled = True //enables element
“PID” Target = 150 //sets the target temp
“PID” Enabled = False //disables element
 
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swanwick

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@swimIan, I appreciate the support. For #3, I am good with enabling and targeting.

So where I am
  • Enabling: understand from instructions, sample scripts, and your share
  • Target: understand from instructions, sample scripts, and your share
  • which element is going to fire in a "one PID, two element" system: question 1
  • which probe PID is going to compare to target in a "one PID, two element" system: question 3
eg.
  • Mash: use HERMS Output as the input value to raise up the HLT element to the Mash target temp
  • Boild: use BK probe as the input value to raise/keep BK element at a low rolling boil
 
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swimIan

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“PID” InputPortID = X is what you need. You will have to determine which InputPortID is equivalent to your Herms or other temp probes.

For Boiling, I’d use a duty cycle element instead of a PID. A PID isn’t designed to boil very well.

//Boiling
“Boil element” DutyCycle = 100
wait “boil temp” value > 210
“Boil element” DutyCycle = 55
wait “boil timer” value < 0

Interlock (my best guess):
“element interlock” state = true //or false

The true would be one of the element and false is another. You might have to do some trial and error to determine.
 
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