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el gato

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I have some left over ingredients laying around and want to make a batch with them. How does this look for a Brown Ale? Do I need to go less on the crystal? Mash at higher temp or Mid-range? Other hop option is EKG.

Thanks for your input :mug:

Recipe: Left Over Brown Ale
TYPE: All Grain
Taste: (35.0)

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Batch Size: 5.50 gal
Boil Size: 7.00 gal
Estimated OG: 1.048 SG
Estimated Color: 19.6 SRM
Estimated IBU: 31.4 IBU
Brewhouse Efficiency: 75.00 %
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
Amount Item Type % or IBU
6.00 lb Pale Malt (2 Row) UK (3.0 SRM) Grain 61.54 %
2.00 lb Munich I (Weyermann) (7.1 SRM) Grain 20.51 %
1.50 lb Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L (60.0 SRM) Grain 15.38 %
0.25 lb Chocolate Malt (450.0 SRM) Grain 2.56 %
0.50 oz Magnum (a) [16.00 %] (60 min) Hops 27.2 IBU
0.50 oz Williamette [5.00 %] (15 min) Hops 4.2 IBU
1.00 items Whirlfloc Tablet (Boil 15.0 min) Misc
1 Pkgs SafAle English Ale (DCL Yeast #S-04) Yeast-Ale
 

Mutilated1

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With that much chocolate its going to be a chocolate ale more than a brown ale. I'd still drink it though, just expect more of a chocolate taste than something like a Brown Ale - you know not something like a Sweetwater Brown or Newcastle - its going to taste chocolatey.
 

SuperiorBrew

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I think you will be ok, a Newkie is about 13-14SRM but you fall nicely into all the brown ale categorys color wise

American Brown AleType: Ale
Category Number: 10C
Original Gravity: 1.045-1.060 SG
Color: 18.0-35.0 SRM
Final Gravity: 1.010-1.016 SG Bitterness: 20.0-45.0 IBU
Carbonation: 2.0-2.6 vols Alcohol by Volume: 4.30-6.20 %
Description: American adaptation of English Brown ale made with higher gravities and hop rate. Drier and more bitter than its English counterparts.
Profile: Medium body and moderate maltiness, slightly dry. Moderate to high bitterness and hop aroma from American hops. Amber to dark brown in color. Higher carbonation than English counterpart.
Ingredients: Aell modified American pale or amber malt. Crystal, Chocolate and Dextrine malts. American hops add bitterness to the flavor. English or American ale yeast. Moderately hard water.
Examples: Pete's Wicked Ale, Brooklyn Brown, Great Lakes Cleveland Brown Ale, Bell's Best Brown, North Coast Acme Brown, Big Sky Moose Drool Brown Ale

Northern English Brown Ale
Type: Ale
Category Number: 11C
Original Gravity: 1.040-1.052 SG
Color: 12.0-22.0 SRM
Final Gravity: 1.008-1.013 SG Bitterness: 20.0-30.0 IBU
Carbonation: 2.2-2.7 vols Alcohol by Volume: 4.20-5.40 %
Description: Variation of English Brown that is dry, nutty, and slightly less sweet than a English Mild Brown.
Profile: Medium body. Dry flavor that is slightly nutty. Medium malt flavor. Low hop flavor and aroma. Low diacytl. Some esters and fruitiness. Medium to med-high carbonation.
Ingredients: Pale or Amber malt. Caramel, Chocolate and Dextrine malts. English hops such as Goldings, Fuggles and Northdown. English ale yeast. Moderately carbonatewater.
Examples: Newcastle Brown, Samuel Smith's Nut Brown. Oregon Nut Brown Ale, Goose Island Hex Nut Brown Ale
 

Atl300zx

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Mutilated1 said:
With that much chocolate its going to be a chocolate ale more than a brown ale. I'd still drink it though, just expect more of a chocolate taste than something like a Brown Ale - you know not something like a Sweetwater Brown or Newcastle - its going to taste chocolatey.
I cant believe you used Sweet Georgia Brown and Newcastle in same sentence. While both are brown by definition, they are two distinctly unique and very different beers.
 
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el gato

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Thanks for the insight. I think I'll give it a whirl and see what happens

Thanks again
 

TexLaw

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It looks great. A quarter pound of chocolate malt will not make the beer taste chocolately, not at all. It will give it some good color, though, and a bit of smooth, roasted notes. If you were not brewing it as a leftover beer, I would suggest finding some US chocolate that is roasted to 350L, but the 450L stuff will work fine.

I do not think you are too high on the crystal malt, either, but I would not add any more without bumping up your IBUs.


TL
 

Mutilated1

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Atl300zx said:
I cant believe you used Sweet Georgia Brown and Newcastle in same sentence. While both are brown by definition, they are two distinctly unique and very different beers.
true, but neither one would taste anything like what a quarter pound of chocolate in a beer will taste like

and Keith, respectfully I disagree with your assessment of what that much chocolate will do - I put as much as 1/2 a pound of chocolate in some beers back November/December time frame, and then cut back to 1/4 pound in several more, the last couple of beers that I made I only used 1-2 ozs of chocolate

I don't know what you're tasting, but for me a little chocolate goes a long way - I wouldn't necessarily say less is more, but 1/4 pound of chocolate - man thats a lot to my tastes - even a couple of ounces the chocolate flavor is very prononced - but a quarter pound ? thats almost like a hershey's bar - haha :mug:

I suppose everyone's tastes is different, but as I taste it 1/4 # in 10-11 # grain bill is an almost overwhelming chocolate taste.
 

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