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British Golden Bitter Recipe

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Omahawk

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I had a great English Golden Ale this weekend at a local brewery. It was wonderfully drinkable and entirely British. Details on the malts and hops weren't available, but it was light gold, clear, slightly biscuity, and had some late hops.

I know very little about this style. I looked into a few recipes, looked into the ingredients my LHBS shop has, and came up with this recipe as a starting point. Anyone that knows the style have any input on how this fits?

6 gallon batch

6 lbs Maris Otter
2 lbs Golden Promise
0.5 lbs Torrified Wheat
0.5 lbs Flaked Corn

1 oz Brewers Gold @ 60 min
1 oz Styrian Goldings @ 1 min
1 oz EKG @ 1 min

1 package WY 1028

OG = 1.045
IBU = 30
SRM = 4

I've seen discussion that many of these beers in Britain use American hops. Thats not what I'm going for with this one.

Thanks for your thoughts.
 

brewing_clown

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May need some crystal? Simpson's medium is English ale. Golden Naked Oats may give you that biscuit. It's a crystal, so no special mashing requirements or clarity concerns. If you can't get those, there really is no substitute, but 60L and Biscuit malt would do.

Maybe consider WLP002 or WY1968 if you're looking for a clearer beer with some fruity esters?

Best of luck!!

PS: A 15 minute addition gives a good late flavor/aroma combo. Dry hopping will punch it up.
 

bierhaus15

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Great to see some interest in Golden Bitters. Stylistically, they are regular bitters without the use of crystal malts, and can be hoppy or not, depending on the brewery. They often contain around 10% sugar or invert, although this is more common with larger breweries.

I brew them pretty regularly and my go-to recipe is 98% Golden Promise or MO blend, with about 2% dark crystal. This is not traditional, but the small amount of crystal helps with the color and lends some balance to my usual heavy hopping. I don't dry hop these. I like using lots of Challenger and Styrian Goldings (orange-marmalade flavor) and typically like a drier, low diacetyl yeast like WLP022, WY1768, or WLP006.

Your recipe looks fine as is, the corn isn't necessary but is not out of place for an older version. I would not add biscuit or other specialty malts, as the base malt should be providing much of the malt character. I might increase the mid kettle and KO hops though, maybe use 1/2 oz Goldings at 15 minutes and the rest at knockout. Brewers Gold actually has a pretty nice aroma to it (blackcurrant/lemon peel) and could be used as a late hop as well. WY1028 will work well, although it may take some time to clear, or use a fining agent. You want these beers to be crystal clear for full flavor. Good luck.
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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May need some crystal? Simpson's medium is English ale. Golden Naked Oats may give you that biscuit. It's a crystal, so no special mashing requirements or clarity concerns. If you can't get those, there really is no substitute, but 60L and Biscuit malt would do.

Maybe consider WLP002 or WY1968 if you're looking for a clearer beer with some fruity esters?

Best of luck!!

PS: A 15 minute addition gives a good late flavor/aroma combo. Dry hopping will punch it up.
I didn't detect much, if any Carmel in the beer I'm shooting for. And it was such a light SRM beer that I'm guessing there wasn't any medium crystal in it. However, I am intrigued by the Golden naked oats - only 10 L I see. If not in this brew, I will definitely try it in a future brew.

Also, likely a good call on the 15 minute flavor addition. I'll work that in.
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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Great to see some interest in Golden Bitters. Stylistically, they are regular bitters without the use of crystal malts, and can be hoppy or not, depending on the brewery. They often contain around 10% sugar or invert, although this is more common with larger breweries.

I brew them pretty regularly and my go-to recipe is 98% Golden Promise or MO blend, with about 2% dark crystal. This is not traditional, but the small amount of crystal helps with the color and lends some balance to my usual heavy hopping. I don't dry hop these. I like using lots of Challenger and Styrian Goldings (orange-marmalade flavor) and typically like a drier, low diacetyl yeast like WLP022, WY1768, or WLP006.

Your recipe looks fine as is, the corn isn't necessary but is not out of place for an older version. I would not add biscuit or other specialty malts, as the base malt should be providing much of the malt character. I might increase the mid kettle and KO hops though, maybe use 1/2 oz Goldings at 15 minutes and the rest at knockout. Brewers Gold actually has a pretty nice aroma to it (blackcurrant/lemon peel) and could be used as a late hop as well. WY1028 will work well, although it may take some time to clear, or use a fining agent. You want these beers to be crystal clear for full flavor. Good luck.
This is great. Nce to hear from an aficionado of the style. :mug: I like the idea you and brewing clown both had with the wy1968 for clarity. This was a brilliantly clear beer I'm targeting, so likely a good call on changing yeast.

I would assume the corn or sugar addition are an either / or kind of deal? Go with 1/2 lb sugar or 1/2 lb flaked maize?

I am thinking about a 1oz addition at 15 minutes, then staying at 2 oz at 1 min / KO. Is that too much? These English hops are pretty restrained and I don't mind hop character at all.

Any and all thoughts are welcome.
 
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Omahawk

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Also, thoughts on torrified wheat? I've never used it. Just for familiarity, I'm tempted to go straight white wheat malt.
 

brewing_clown

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Also, thoughts on torrified wheat? I've never used it. Just for familiarity, I'm tempted to go straight white wheat malt.
My understanding is that torrified wheat is whole kernel wheat that has been pre-gelatinized and does not need a cereal mash. Essentially flaked wheat that hasn't been flaked. Will give you improved body and head retention.
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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My understanding is that torrified wheat is whole kernel wheat that has been pre-gelatinized and does not need a cereal mash. Essentially flaked wheat that hasn't been flaked. Will give you improved body and head retention.
Yeah, that's what I read. My thought was that white wheat malt would do the same thing. Is there more protein wi torrified wheat? I'm almost thinking if I want a clear beer, I should go with malted wheat. Unless there's a significantly different flavor contribution.
 

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They have different flavours, but at the rate you'd be using them at it's mainly for head retention and mouthfeel, I wouldn't worry at all

you could go less if you are worried about excess protein from the wheat, 0.25lb or so would be fine for the purpose, just increase base malt to compensate for gravity

And light crystal is ok for golden bitters but I wouldn't use much if any. (says the person who chucked in 8% carahell into his last two golden ales :p)
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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They have different flavours, but at the rate you'd be using them at it's mainly for head retention and mouthfeel, I wouldn't worry at all

you could go less if you are worried about excess protein from wheat
Thanks, I think I'm going to change up the wheat to wheat malt and 1/4 lb.

And light crystal is ok for golden bitters but I wouldn't use much if any. (says the person who chucked in 8% carahell into his last two golden ales :p)
Got it. Do as you say, not as you do. :)

I keep hearing crystal. I'm wanting this to be light, but I do want some body with it. I think I'll add just a little light crystal, as I tend to mash around 150-151 F.

This is where I'm at right now. I might be overdoing the hops. More input is encouraged:

6 gallon batch at end of boil

9lbs Maris Otter
0.375 lbs white Wheat malt
0.25 lbs Carapils
0.2 lbs acid malt (for mash ph)

1 oz Brewers Gold @ 60 min
1 oz EKG @ 15 min
2 oz Styrian Goldings @ 1 min

1 package WY 1968

OG = 1.048
IBU = 35
SRM = 4.3

Notes: 1 tsp CaCl, 1/2 tsp gypsum to mash.
No sparge.
 
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Count Teku

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Just stumbled upon this, and understand it's 3+ years old. It's one of my favorite styles. At my brewhouse I make a Golden bitter that is essentially 41% Golden Promise 41% Maris Otter 9% flaked Barley 9% flaked Oats. This is the only thing I really drink out of the tap room. It turns out nice and bready/biscuity with a nice honey undertone. I use all EKG. Gets a nice floral character here. And you should use some form of S-04, hence giving it the essential fruity character if done right. I don't want to give away too much more, for it's a recipe I've sworn over to the brewery.

Cheers

JS
 
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Omahawk

Omahawk

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Just stumbled upon this, and understand it's 3+ years old. It's one of my favorite styles. At my brewhouse I make a Golden bitter that is essentially 41% Golden Promise 41% Maris Otter 9% flaked Barley 9% flaked Oats. This is the only thing I really drink out of the tap room. It turns out nice and bready/biscuity with a nice honey undertone. I use all EKG. Gets a nice floral character here. And you should use some form of S-04, hence giving it the essential fruity character if done right. I don't want to give away too much more, for it's a recipe I've sworn over to the brewery.

Cheers

JS
You’ve inspired me to brew this again this summer. Any advice on hop schedule?

Thanks.
 

Holden Caulfield

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Coincidentally, I just brewed this...

Yeast - WLP007

Grain BillLovibondOzsLBs% LBsPoints
Golden Promise, Simpsons, UK2.6165.0210.3192.0%303
Crystal 45L, Crisp, UK454.480.282.5%8
Torrified Wheat, Crisp, UK1.97.170.454.0%13
Acidulated Malt, Weyermann, Germany34.130.262.3%7

Hop ScheduleOzAA %AAUsIBUs%Boil mins
Northern Brewer (German)0.6608.2%5.4117.152.0%60
Styrian Golding (Slovenia)1.0003.5%3.505.416.3%15
Styrian Golding (Slovenia)1.0003.5%3.500.51.4%1
Magnum0.23013.7%3.1510.030.3%60

Wonky hop schedule is due to using what I had in freezer for bittering. It's pretty much a GP-Styrian Smash with a hint of crystal to keep it from drying out too much from the Dry English Ale yeast. It's bubbling away nicely and smells great. I will let you know how it turns out. Below is a snapshot of the entire recipe...

1598368866173.png
 

Northern_Brewer

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It's pretty much a GP-Styrian Smash with a hint of crystal to keep it from drying out too much from the Dry English Ale yeast.
Don't be afraid of dryness in British beers - they're not all sugary messes like Hobgoblin, attenuations of up to 80% are not uncommon and 90+% is possible. There is a regional element to it though, they tend to be drier up north - 2% crystal would be regarded as standard bitter territory.
 

visitor

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I've also been keeping a british style beer on one of my 6 taps. I'm partial to mild but currently really enjoying a bitter and next brew day is a golden. I've pretty much standardized on London Ale III for most of my beers although WY1968 has been killer for me too. I tend to mash low on my british beers and enjoy them on the dry side.

Next project is a proper beer engine.

Keep on brewing!

Cheers!
 

Twinkeelfool

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I brewed one yesterday. Simpson’s maris otter and 10% dextrose and low mash temp. EKG at 60 and 5 minutes and will ferment will be 1469. Not sure whether it’ll go on my nitro tap or plain tap. Usually bitter or mild I prefer on an engine or in a bottle but the above will be kegged.
 

Holden Caulfield

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Just read that not following up on how a recipe turned out may be a wee bit annoying to some, and not wanting to be a major offender, I am following up on the results of the golden bitter recipe in post #13. BTW, I know the "Biggest Lies" thread was just poking fun at ourselves so all smiles here :)

It turned out great. Big hit with drinking buddies. I am finding that adding about 2.5% of medium crystal/caramel malts to a single base malt results in great beer - at least according to my taste buds.

The golden bitter is ready at the same time as an American-ish lager that was brewed with 97.6% 2-row, 2.4% caramunich type 1, 1.5 oz of Liberty 60 mins, and .5 oz Liberty at 15 mins. What I find interesting, is that the lager brewed with only a half ounce of Liberty finishing hops has a much more pronounced hop flavor than the pale bitter that had 2 ounces of Styrian Celeia for finishing.
 

redarmy990

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was just reading all the posts on here and wanted to weigh in.
One of the best versions of this style is produced by Kelham Island brewery in Sheffield uk. I lived around 20 minutes from the brewery and actually worked in what was there brewery when it was converted to a museum. I do know that Pale rider is a great beer. Its hopped with Willamette hops and has a slight honey taste but doesn't have honey in there( been to there brew pub and asked). Most people call pale rider a pale ale but in fact it is a golden ale/bitter and tastes fantastic on cask.
 

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