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Osedax

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It is finally warm enough where I live to brew. I want something kind of summery and very drinkable. This is the recipe I came up with. I will be brewing it this weekend.

Grain Bill:
7# Red Millet 2L
3# Buckwheat 3L
2# White Quinoa 2L
2# Flaked Corn .8L
1# Crystal Quinoa 20L (homemade)
1# Munich Amaranth 10L

Adjuncts:
1# Clover honey at flameout
.5# Maltodextrin
2oz Chamomile at flameout

Hops:
60- 1oz Target 10.7
15- 1oz Centennial 8.7
FO- 1oz Centennial 8.7
FO- 1oz Citra 13.9
Dry Hop (7 days)- Crystal 3.4

Yeast:
US-05 Ferment at 63F for 2 weeks

OG- 1.060 est
FG- 1.012 est
ABV- 6.5%
IBU- 60 est
Color- 9 SRM est

Any advice or critiques would be appreciated. I'm not sure how deep to toast the amaranth. I am thinking 10L but I might wet roast it a little longer. I am also torn on the hopping and chamomile. Hopefully someone can chime in.:mug:

I call it Sleepy-time IPA :D
 

prandlesc

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I think you should re-think your grain choices, as I haven't heard of anyone brewing successfully with the mix of grains you've identified. I'm not sure how drinkable that recipe would turn out. If you're wanting to try out some alternate grains, you should use them in smaller quantities as a supplemental specialty grain, rather than as the primary grain. I'd suggest starting with 2 row pale and adding some of the other grains you've listed as character builders. Adding the sugars you've included will move the alcohol content to a level above "very drinkable". Also, ssing Citra at flameout seems to be an odd choice too, as it is more of a bittering hops than an aroma hops - even though it adds a great aroma.

So, if you're trying to achieve a wacky beer that will make great party conversation, your recipe may work well. If you're trying to make an drinkable IPA, you might want to start over.
 

Ash_Mathew

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Dude, this is a gluten free section. The grains are perfectly normal for Coeliacs. I have heard of many people brewing with those grains, including myself. Barley can literally kill Coeliacs, so no, adding 2 row would not be a cracking idea.

The recipe looks good to me. Never used those hops though, dude. So can't comment. Let me know how it goes. How are you finding the crystal? :)
 

Jayhem

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I agree with prandlesc for the most part.

6.5% ABV is not what I would call "very drinkable" or "summer brew".... You want something light and refreshing that doesn't get you drunk if you have 3-4 of them in short order on a hot day.

When I think of a Summer brew I think of something blonde, yellow, amber and 4-5.5% abv.

I have a 4.0% abv blonde that is perfect for a hot day and a 5.5% American Pale Ale that is so refreshing with Citra, Cascade and Centennial dry hop its's as refreshing as drinking a cold Lemonade. :D

I know little of gluten free brewing but 6.5% abv is not a drinkable summer brew, more of a sipper.
 
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Osedax

Osedax

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Should have been more clear. I should have said a very drinkable gluten free ipa. Millet is a bit "strong". I believe I will need a higher abv and a bit more hop forward. I have to aim high incase of terrible conversion. It happens a lot with these grains.

There is no way citra is a bittering hop. I hear it tastes like cat pee when used for a bittering addition. I like target for bittering and I have it on hand.

Trust me. I am going to make session beers later. A cream ale is next on the list.

Keep the advice coming.
 
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Osedax

Osedax

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Also, the crystal seems alright. Tastes like sweetened grapenuts. Not sure that its quite sweet enough. We will see.
 

igliashon

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I love it when non-GF brewers wander in here mistakenly, drop a bunch of really clueless advice, and then get red-faced when they realize their mistake. :ban:

Are these grains self-malted or from CMC? I've heard the DP on red millet is kinda weak.

Citra is most DEFINITELY NOT a bittering hop!! :smack: I don't know where that dude got THAT idea. I might actually bump up the hops, I've used a schedule like that for a 3-gallon batch a few times and thought it was just hoppy enough. You could double those FO additions, easily.

The chamomile will definitely come through, BTW, even if you add it at 60. Chamomile is delicious in a beer, but it's also quite distinct. It will merge nicely with those hops. 2 oz should be just enough for a 5-gallon, I use 1 oz in my 3-gallon batches.
 
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Osedax

Osedax

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Was hoping you would chime in, igliashon. I got the idea from the ipa you made.

Haha! I don't blame some of these guys stumbling into the GF forum. They most likely just click on the most recent thread. Although the 7lbs of millet should've thrown a flag. Thought, I agree it is a bit strong for "very drinkable".

All the malt is CMC. The millet is weak diastically but, very "malty". I wanted quinoa but, the LHBS was out. I am going to get a 50lb sack soon.

I'm trying to use all my leftover hops. I agree that more aggresive hopping would be better. The only other hop I have is an oz of nelson sauvin. I'm contemplating throwing it in.

So the chamomile is good at FO? I was going to do it at 30 like your recipe but, I was told flameout by a trusted source. I don't normally spice/ herb my beers.
 

processhead

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Someone in the GF community please educate me.
Which grains is the O.P.'s grain bill have the enzymes that allow starch conversion?

Thanks.
 
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Osedax

Osedax

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I can. All of these grains (except the corn) have been professionally malted by colorado malting company. Similar to barley malt. Millet and quinoa have more than enough enzymes to self convert. Buckwheat doesn't seem to. Amaranth is too small to crush, so I can't comment on it.

I have read every article, lab report, and essay that I can get on the subject. I can go into more detail if you want but, I would need a new thread. :)

Hope that helps.
 

Cainepolo12

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I know that someone on here uses a millet base a lot but can't remember who. I am malting some quinoa as a base for an amber. Looks great! Give it a go. The coolest thing in this community is that it's almost guaranteed no one else has tried your recipe. Let the learning commence!
 

igliashon

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I've done chamomile at 60 minutes, staggered at 60/30/FO, and all at FO. There is very little difference. Chamomile does not seem to be like hops, where aromatics get boiled off. The most recent beer I did had chamomile in at 60, and it came out plenty strong, overpowering the 2 oz of sorachi ace hops even!

How does the red millet compare, flavor-wise, to the german millet from CMC? I've done a few beers with unmalted millet and they are far and away the most "malty". Have been right unimpressed with quinoa--about like rice in terms of flavor contribution it seems, but maybe a little less salty.
 
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Osedax

Osedax

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I know that someone on here uses a millet base a lot but can't remember who.

You might be thinking of Andrew Lavery. He has great papers on malting and mashing millet.

Also, might I suggest the name golden goose IPA

Ha. Yeah, gluten free isn't cheap. This recipe is right around $50.

I'm not sure how the red millet compares to the German millet. I have only used their red millet. I am trying to get white millet from them now. You have the quinoa dead on. I like how easy it is to use but, that is about it. Red/ brown quinoa does taste a little nuttier and fuller than white quinoa.

Right now I am trying to figure out the right combination of grains. Quinoa with millet and buckwheat is my go to base for now. Each grain contributes something that the others are lacking. Getting the ratio right is the trick.

Good to know about the chamomile. I will be brewing this tomorrow. I am attempting a traditional single infusion mash. I have used combinations of step and decoction techniques with no noticeable difference. We will see what happens.

I will update everything I can. Hopefully I will get some pics and insights.
 

prandlesc

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Dude, this is a gluten free section. The grains are perfectly normal for Coeliacs. I have heard of many people brewing with those grains, including myself. Barley can literally kill Coeliacs, so no, adding 2 row would not be a cracking idea.

The recipe looks good to me. Never used those hops though, dude. So can't comment. Let me know how it goes. How are you finding the crystal? :)

My bad on gluten free. I was just looking at unanswered threads. Delete everything in my previous post!!
 

Ash_Mathew

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That is CRAZY that it costs you that much! I have just done a five imperial gallon batch for roughly £11-12. If you work out the hops price for that brew etc. 1KG of buckwheat is about £3. I use sugar in my brews too, but 1KG of brown sugar is only about £1.50. About 100g of hops is between £3-4. But break that down into how much I use for a brew, doesn't add up to that much. How does it cost you that much? I have even just done an all corn batch, again 5 imperial gallons and 1KG of popping corn only cost me £1.83. And we don't even really grow corn here. Do you add in the gas/electric used to heat up the water and what not?
 
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Osedax

Osedax

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Ha. No I didn't add the gas cost in. I estimated what it would cost most people. The hops I am using are the expensive ones. I also harvest yeast. The grains are $2.50 a pound. Hops are $2-3 an ounce. Honey is like $2-3 a pound. The british ecomony is better. I think a pound is like 1.8 dollars or something like that.

Funny thing is, I can get malted quinoa shipped from colorado cheaper than the bulk bin in a supermarket.

I could go cheaper but, I like to support my LHBS.
 

Ash_Mathew

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That is still pretty mental. I just planted my hop plant today. Trying to save even more money. Haha Then once my garden is sorted fully, buckwheat growing. :) I want to get to the point where I am hardly paying anything to make beer. Haha

See, I have to order my grains online. To get them in a shop would be way too much effort and take me out of my way. If I am ever in Leeds though, I get them from a small family owned shop. They actually work out cheaper than online, but like I said, more hassle to get to. The corn is not so bad though, as I work in the city the shop is in that sells it. :)

Still, I think your brew looks pretty good. I might have to give it a go, and I am not one for citrus tasting hops after the disappointment with my first beers when I used cascade. :)
 
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Osedax

Osedax

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Yeah, its actually not that bad. I am starting to buy in bulk, wash yeast, and grow my own hops. Hoping to bring my recipes down a few $$.

So I brewed this yesterday. Everything went off without a hitch. I made 2 changes to the recipe. I used buckwheat honey instead of clover and I added .25oz of target at 30(what I had left).

Mashed at 154F, lautered 5 gallons of first runnings, and boiled 7. Collected slightly over 5 gallons of some amazing smelling wort. Hit my numbers a little higher than planned. Looking at 1.061. I estimated 1.060 for 5 gallons but, I lost around a 1/2 gallon because the chamomile clogged my dip tube. I didn't seem worth it to get the last bit. Next mod will be a filter on my dip tube. :)

Either way, I got close to 80% efficiency without a stuck sparge. Its bubbling away right now. :rockin:

Pics to come. They are on my buds phone. Updates after fermentation as well.
 

Ash_Mathew

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I recently invested in this bad boy. Changed my life. It has a filter in the bottom so it stops grains and hops from going into the fermentation bin/carboy. Sure you could find something like it in America? Would help you salvage the bottom of your brew. :)

http://www.brewuk.co.uk/store/ag-equipment/boilers/32l-stainless-pan.html

Well, just checked on my hop root today (I have named him Albert and I don't know why) and he looks to have grown a little today. Plus, my mum and dad have made me order them some hops for their garden as they don't like cats and they will keep them out. So I have EKG in my garden, then ordered Fuggles and Challenger for theirs. I cannae wait. :)

Brew looks good, too. Hurry up with those snaps of the brew. :)
 
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Osedax

Osedax

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Looks like a bazooka tube. It wouldn't really work for me. I have a keggle. I need the dip tube. I'm just going to use a mash tea ball.

Here are some pics of the beer.

Mash and a hydrometer sample. Not sure where the other pics are. Forgot to take a pic of the hydrometer after the brew. This one is after a few days of fermenting. Hence the low floating hydrometer.

Chamomile Mash.jpg


Chamomile IPA Hydrometer.jpg
 
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Osedax

Osedax

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Kegged it today. Not quite 2 weeks but, I think it will be fine. I also added 1oz citra leaf to the keg. I'm going to wait until it is done carbing before I pass any judgement on it. Should have an update in a few days.

Racking


Keg Hops


Sample
 
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Osedax

Osedax

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This may be the best beer I have made yet. The chamomile is definitely powerful stuff. Fruity, smooth, and thick mouth feel. This beer will sneak up on you at 6.3% abv.

I brought this to a brew day at my LHBS. Everyone really liked it. Most people couldn't even tell it was gluten free. One guy even asked me for the recipe. I highly recommend this beer. I would like to thank igliashon for the recipe that inspired this.

I would only change a few things. More late additions would be good. Either way, a definite re-brew. :mug:



Just needs to clear up a bit.
 
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