BrewVint Alcohol Boost ?????

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Grinder12000

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Anybody use this?

I have a recipe that is 3.2% ABV and . . .well . . . .why bother.

But if it was 4.2% ABV then I would look into it.

BrewVint Alcohol Boost says it adds 1% with no changing the taste, color, or aroma
 

donajr

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I have used it on couple of brews and it did not change the color or taste but did raise the alcohol content by a little under 1% on each
 
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Grinder12000

Grinder12000

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Seems like a plan.

I'm looking at a Southern English Brown

OG 1.041
FG 1.013
IBU 17
Color 26SRM
Alcohol 3.80%


Pale Ale LME 5.0lb

Crystal 80L 1.0lb
Crystal 120L 10.0oz
Special Roast 0.5lb
Pale Chocolate 6.0oz
Carafa Special II 0.25lb

Kent Goldings 5% 60min 0.85oz

Wyeast - 1968 London ESB Ale
carb 1 to 1.5 vol
 

Beerrific

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3.2% is right in line for a Southern English Brown. IMO, adding the alcohol boost in this beer would be a mistake. This should be a malty beer with a decent body and creamy, the extra alcohol will thin the beer out and detract from the body.

Why not brew it at 3.2%?
 
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Grinder12000

Grinder12000

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Why not brew it at 3.2%?
Why not drink decaffeinated coffee ??

Heck! Even with 4.2% beer it takes too much liquid for me to catch a buzz and I only weight 165.

So what you are saying is that even though it will not change the taste, color, or aroma it WILL change the mouth feel??? and if that is the case I understand completely.
 

craigrigney

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I used the boost for a southern borwn ale so it was 4.8 instead of 3.8 and I loved it. It was the first time I tried it and the taste was great...not over powering at all, and the taste was great.
 

cheezydemon

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There are tons of ways to boost alcohol. It seems like a gimmick to me.

Heck enough corn sugar in that recipe for 1% more abv would not change the flavor IMHO.

Or a little more pale LME? I just don't get it.
 
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There are tons of ways to boost alcohol...but for a buck or 2 and for the support of Forrest, I ordered 5 of them just to have on hand with my last order....I used one on a beer that was coming up a bit shy on gravity...Of course it won't do what the additional malt would have done, but it did do a nice job of cranking up the abv. I say Money well spent.
 

elkdog

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I'd just make a stronger beer, but I don't see anything wrong with kicking up the abv if that's what you're after. As a fellow lightweight guy, I actually appreciate session ales because I can enjoy more of them without getting stupid. A 4.2" Southern Brown isn't exactly hooch, though.

Apfelwein is where I turn for something a little more high octane. That stuff will talk to you.
 

Nablis

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Ive used it a couple times but you could also just add cane sugar (table sugar) it ferments easily, same as corn sugar which is what you are getting.
 

Austinhomebrew

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Ive used it a couple times but you could also just add cane sugar (table sugar) it ferments easily, same as corn sugar which is what you are getting.
It is not simple corn sugar. It is not simple corn sugar. It is not simple corn sugar.

Cane sugar is less refined and will give an off flavor.

There are many ways to raise the alcohol in a beer. Alcohol Boost is the least expensive way that does not change the flavor.

Did I mention that Alcohol Boost is not simple corn sugar?

It really is not a gimmick to sell more simple corn sugar. It is more fermentable that simple corn sugar. Breweries use this type of sugar to boost the alcohol content in an inexpensive way.

Forrest
 

bkov

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"Cane sugar is less refined and will give an off flavor."
that is false, UNLESS you add a ton of it. Enough to boost the abv 1% will not give any off flavors, no more then the brewvint alcohol boost.
 

Austinhomebrew

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that is false, UNLESS you add a ton of it. Enough to boost the abv 1% will not give any off flavors, no more then the brewvint alcohol boost.
That is false. You will have an off flavor long before you add 2,000 lbs of cane sugar.
 

Austinhomebrew

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well...I use the stuff...but i think you could just as well use SIMPLE CORN SUGAR? :cross:

**BK ducks and runs from the Flying Cornie Kegs that I'm sure Forrest is now throwing
Your are correct BK except that since Alchol Boost is highly fermentable sugar (more so that simple corn sugar or cane sugar) it takes less sugar to reach 1% so it is the least expensive method to obtain an extra 1% without a flavor change.
So you can use regular corn sugar as well without any flavor change but it will cost more.
 
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Grinder12000

Grinder12000

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Thanks Forest - I have to think that Alcohol Boost was made for a purpose other then trying to make a buck.

In summery

you CAN use simple corn sugar with good results, however Alcohol Boost is the best way to go because it is closer to perfection.

So it depends how close to perfection you want to be.

If you want to boost 6.0 to 7.0 use Corn sugar but 3.0 to 4.0 you might want to use Alcohol Boost.

At least that is MY take on this.

BTW - Forest - Now your places needs to have a listing of all companies that use packing peanuts! :)
 
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Your are correct BK
The only correct part (and only part that wasn't' sarcastic) of my statement was when I said I use it.

I am really not a fan of adding sugar to a typical beer...unless it's something that the recipe calls for in the first place.

What it comes down to for me is this:
You CAN put anything in your beer. You CAN use a lot of things to boost alcohol. You CAN use 40# of crushed corn and 100# of White Table Sugar and Ferment it in old truck inner tube....doesn't mean it's going to be good...I spend a lot of money on making sure I've the best ingredients and equipment I can afford, I'm certainly NOT going to skimp here.
 

bkov

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it takes less sugar to reach 1% so it is the least expensive method to obtain an extra 1% without a flavor change.
looks about the same price to me. brewvint is $1.99, while a pound of corn sugar is $1.59

a pound of regular table sugar would also work without any offflavors
 

Austinhomebrew

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While you can use any type of sugar you want it is not always recommended. Professional Breweries use the High Maltose Corn Sugar that is in Alcohol Boost. Professional Breweries do not use cane sugar. We are simply using the same sugar the pros do to raise the alcohol content in an inexpensive way that does not cause off flavors. You can use Alcohol Boost on any beer and at any alcohol level.

I just let the customers decide. They seem to like using the product because they buy around 500 packages a month.

Forrest
 

pcolson

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ive used it with all of my AHB brews made the dry stout and special holiday ale last night added to both of them... oh BTW the special holiday ale smelled AMAZING forrest...
 

Nablis

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It is not simple corn sugar. It is not simple corn sugar. It is not simple corn sugar.

Cane sugar is less refined and will give an off flavor.

There are many ways to raise the alcohol in a beer. Alcohol Boost is the least expensive way that does not change the flavor.

Did I mention that Alcohol Boost is not simple corn sugar?

It really is not a gimmick to sell more simple corn sugar. It is more fermentable that simple corn sugar. Breweries use this type of sugar to boost the alcohol content in an inexpensive way.

Forrest
oh cool didn't realize good to know.
 

Beerrific

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Professional Breweries do not use cane sugar.
This is not true. I was recently taking a tour of a medium size, well-known brewery that brews all Belgian style beers, they had about 5 of these (or very similar) ready to go into the boil:

And I have had their beer and it tastes great, no off flavors. I have also heard that many traditional (trappist, etc.) Belgian breweries use cane sugar.

Cane sugar is 100% ferementable and yeast will actually ferment it first (before maltose, etc.). If you have the correct amount of healthy yeast adding cane sugar to your should not add off flavors (unless you are adding >20% or so).
 

MikeFlynn74

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Belgian beers use those flavors. Besides when you boil you break down cane sugar to a more simple for of sugar thats even more ferment able.
 

Austinhomebrew

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I am just curious why you would want to use cane sugar? Is it the price? Is it the flavor you want in your beer? You can certainly tell when a belgian beer has Beet Sugar (Candi Sugar) in it. Having tasted plenty of beers that customers have brought in, I can taste cane sugar or candi sugar in a beer.

Ultimately, it is up to you what you want to put in your beer.
Forrest
 

PseudoChef

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I am just curious why you would want to use cane sugar? Is it the price? Is it the flavor you want in your beer? You can certainly tell when a belgian beer has Beet Sugar (Candi Sugar) in it. Having tasted plenty of beers that customers have brought in, I can taste cane sugar or candi sugar in a beer.

Ultimately, it is up to you what you want to put in your beer.
Forrest
Cane sugar and beet sugar share the same molecular structure, Forrest. They only differ about 0.05% in what impurities exist in the product through the refining process. I can buy 5 lbs of cane sugar at the supermarket for under $2 and since I'm going there anyway, it is no extra cost for shipping, etc.

Also, when a 2-time Ninkasi winner has published a best-selling (among homebrewers) book where recipes use cane sugar, I will take his competition-proven advice.
 

bkov

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why, because its the same exact result, and its cheaper and its already in most households! what flavor do you speak of when using cane sugar? i bet you if you send me 3 of brewing kits, and i brew them all but add 1pound cane sugar to one, one pack brewvint boost to one, and one by itself, you wont be able to tell the difference between any of them. but the one with the pound cane sugar and the one with brewvint pack will be the same alc percent.

belgian beers are suppose to have sugar in them, its there style.

its hard to taste 1 or even 2 pounds of cane sugar added to a medium to high gravity brew.

dont tell brewers false information just to help sell your product, that or get your information right.
 

Ooompa Loompa

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its hard to taste 1 or even 2 pounds of cane sugar added to a medium to high gravity brew.
I've never used brewvint, and probably never will (If I want more alcohol in a beer I'll add more malt, but that's just me, I don't see anything wrong with brewvint). That being said the OP doesn't have a medium to high gravity beer. He has a low gravity beer, and if he were to just dump an extra pound table sugar into that brew I'd be willing to bet there will be some cidery flavors. Enough cidery flavors to make it a "bad, undrinkable beer"?? Probably not, but I don't think it would be as good as it could be.
 

bkov

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the pound of corn sugar wouldent add any more cider flavors the the BW alc boost would
 

bkov

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sorry, i just tell the truth...atleast to the best of my knowledge...which im 99% is correct on this subject
 

Austinhomebrew

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Brewvint Alcohol Boost is not needed in any batch but people like using it. I am not telling you to use it over cane sugar. Go for it. All I am saying is that I wouldn't use cane sugar. Alcohol Boost does not add any flavor.

If you ask 10 brewers you will get 12 answers and 68% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

Use the ingredients you prefer.

Forrest
 
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