Brewing Kolsch

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daveooph131

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I am wanting to brew a Kolsch. Everything thus far I've done has been from a kit, but I would like to step out from that.

Can you help me piece together a recipe.

What kind of yeast reccomendation / hops / extract / I would also like to try to steep some grains.
 

Yankeehillbrewer

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Yeast-Wyeast 2565 Kolsch
Lightest LME/DME you can get
Maybe steep some Vienna or Munich, not sure if that will keep it in style
Hops-Saaz,Hallerteau,Fuggles to name a few

Ferment it fairly cool 60-65, and cold store it for about 4 weeks after bottling if you can.

Here's my AG version..

8lbs 2 row, Mash at 149 for 60 mins
.5 oz Chinook for 60
.5 oz Chinook for 30
1 oz Saaz for 5
Pitch Wyeast 2565

This is a little out of style in the hops department, but it comes across nice and mellow. OG is usually around 1.044.

Hope this helps
 
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daveooph131

daveooph131

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what would be the result if I fermented a little warmer around 70?
 

HenryHill

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The whole point of a kolsch is to ferment very cold, using specific kolsch yeast. If you can't control ferm temps to the 50's, don't make a kolsch.
 
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daveooph131

daveooph131

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I've got a fridge I can use, but there is no temp control on it. By turning the unit down I can get the fridge to around 50-55 f, but that could fluxuate as I keep it in the garage....would 55 be suitable for a kolsch?
 

woodenbuick

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I make a Kolsche with:
10 lbs German Pils and
1/2 lb Munich Malt. Mash at 150 for 90 minutes.
Sparge and boid for 90 minutes.
.75 oz Spalts hops at 60 minutes.
Pitch yeast at 68 and ferment 10 days at 68. Wyeast 2565 No starter.
Drop down to 36 for 5 days before kegging.

OG 1.040 FG 1.012
 

-Dan-

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The whole point of a kolsch is to ferment very cold, using specific kolsch yeast. If you can't control ferm temps to the 50's, don't make a kolsch.
Oh really? Sorry but I have to disagree! I ferment my Kolsch at about 65 and it comes out like a beauty... same yeast and almost same grain bill.
 

android

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i think a lot of people do the bee cave brewery kolsch at ~65 and succeed.
 

r2eng

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+1 on the 60-65F ferment... just be careful about adding wheat to your Kolsch. I do not like wits, and the wheat's flavor definitely comes through too much.. IMO. Stick with barley.
 

HenryHill

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Oh really? Sorry but I have to disagree! I ferment my Kolsch at about 65 and it comes out like a beauty... same yeast and almost same grain bill.
I didn't say you couldn't do it. You could do that with any ale yeast and have beer. I like to ferment with dry yeast at about 62°-64°, depending on how vigorous it takes off.

There are many brewers that feel that fermenting as cool as is practical for the yeast makes a cleaner beer. The Oregon clubs are believers of this practice. Kolsch yeast was developed specifically for cold fermentation, so high 50's low, 60's is possible. My point is that kolsch yeast is meant to be fermented cold, being a sort of hybrid lager/ale yeast.

As to the wheat, apparently only about 1 brewery in Cologne makes a kolsch with wheat. By using a german or euro pilsener, you can have the good head and body without the need for wheat.

EDIT: heh, minutes later I ran across this:
From:
http://pivo.northernbrewer.com/nbst...8A?searchTerm=johnson+refrigerator+thermostat


'Digital Temperature Controller

Like the #7051, our Digital Temp Controller operates by overriding the internal thermostat in a refrigerator or freezer and gives the brewer greater control over the fermentation. Unlike the #7051, however, the digital controller has a digital display with adjustable differential. It can be used to heat or cool a fermentation environment - when hooked up to a refrigerator, it turns the compressor on when the ambient temperature rises above your programmed temperature; when hooked up to a heater, it activates when the temperature drops too low. A sensor probe monitors the temperature inside while the readout displays it in either Fahrenheit or Celsius. This is the ideal choice for lager brewers who include a diacetyl rest in their fermentations or for ales like altbier or Kolsch that require fermentation temperatures in the low end of the ale range.'
 

Punx Clever

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I'm with wooden,

my koelsch is somethin like this:

7lbs Belgian Pils
2lbs white malted wheat
1.5 oz spalt at 60
0.5 oz spalt at 10

Wyeast 2565

at 65% eff that puts me at the bottom of the style guidelines for OG, IBU and Color

Fermet at 65 F or so.

I disagree that 60-65 F doesn't work with koelsch. Mine comes out very very well fermenting at 65 (cause thats what the apartment is set at). Matches commercial koelsch examples well. The yeast is a very clean fermenting yeast which allows lager like beers brewed at standard ale temps. Koelsch yeast is a standby for those who want a lager-like beer but can't keep the temps in lager range.

For a full boil extract, I'd go with this:
4lbs Extra light dry extract (or pils)
1lb Dry wheat extract
1.5 spalt @ 60
0.5 spalt @ 10
Wyeast 2565

OG - 1.044
Color - 3.9
IBU - 20.7
 

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