Brew room design questions

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

OP
H

hezagenius

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
2,271
Reaction score
2,048
Location
Iowa
Ugh. First major build snag. Had a big rain yesterday afternoon and there was leaking down into the brew room. No roof on the garage so obviously way more water than would ever be on the floor above it, but it definitely does leak down to the brew room. And garage floor does not drain well so I have concerns about winter time when snow builds up on cars and slowly melts off. Not sure what to do about it. I have some workaround ideas but for the chunk of change we are spending, I don't want to go in needing workarounds on day 1.

Builder said the concrete cap above the precast should provide a seal. Obviously concrete shrinks so there was no way it was going to seal up against the wall. He said to call him when it leaks. My diplomatic wife (an attorney) sent him an email this morning. Waiting to hear back. I'm sure he'll say there will never be that much water, which is true. That's what I would say. But since the floor above it is essentially flat, it wouldn't take much water to make it to the side and leak down the wall. And when floor cracks at control joints (under where a car will be parked), I don't see any way it won't leak with rain or snow unless remedied somehow. Grrr.
20210920_174320.jpg
20210920_174308.jpg
20210920_173041.jpg
 
OP
H

hezagenius

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
2,271
Reaction score
2,048
Location
Iowa
Agreed on the timing. When we built our house, the original builder said if you want to know if something leaks, spray it with a hose for 10 minutes and wait. I told my wife I was going to do that this weekend and she said not to. Legally speaking, if I caused the leak, that could hurt us in any legal dispute. So a hard rain in that sense was a good thing.

I'm just wondering if there should have been some kind of barrier between the precast panels and the concrete on top of it. My concern was never that water would seep through the concrete and the panels, but that it would seep through any gaps between the concrete and the panels. In tiled showers, there is a waterproof barrier under the tiles. I wonder if there should have been something like that here?
 

NickTheGreat

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2012
Messages
1,225
Reaction score
424
The roof will help a lot, but I understand your snow/ice predicament. I'm curious what they'll say . . .
 
OP
H

hezagenius

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
2,271
Reaction score
2,048
Location
Iowa
It's the snow and rain dripping from a car that's the primary issue, and really mostly just snow. But there are times when your wheel well gets full of snow and ice and those are big chunks just slowly melting on the slab, sometimes for days in colder weather.

I'm also now curious if, on humid days, will moisture build up in the voids and cause leaks?

I'd rather address any preventative measures now than reactive measures later. I asked the builder last week if there was any sealant we could put on the seam of the floor and he said it's not worth it unless there's an issue. Now the wall frames are sitting on those seams so getting to them is much more difficult. And will be even harder/impossible to address as soon as the roof goes on.
 
OP
H

hezagenius

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
2,271
Reaction score
2,048
Location
Iowa
Builder said he would seal the control joints and the perimeter. Of course the perimeter is now covered with framing so it is unclear how that will happen.
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2013
Messages
1,724
Reaction score
1,968
Location
New Brighton
Concrete is not waterproof. If you don’t want any water to get in you need a waterproof system. One lesser expensive option is something called traffic topping. It would be a decent choice given where you are at in construction. You would want to either build curbs around the sides of the garage or install flashing that ties into the traffic topping and goes up the side wall a few inches.

There are more robust systems, but you would have to undo some of what you’ve done to install them. Also a lot more $$$.

IMHO is he contractor offering to seal the cracks is a hail marry to have it last long enough for you to forget his phone number. It’s not a reliable solution. I wouldn’t bother doing it.

[edit to fix mistakes made with auttocorrect on my phone. Hopefully it now better approximates English!]
 
Last edited:
OP
H

hezagenius

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
2,271
Reaction score
2,048
Location
Iowa
Since the framing is there, it probably makes sense to wait until the drywall is on. Then use flashing.
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2013
Messages
1,724
Reaction score
1,968
Location
New Brighton
I think you would find that most building codes would require the whole floor to slope toward the door at 1/8" per foot. I'm not sure about your area.
 
OP
H

hezagenius

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
2,271
Reaction score
2,048
Location
Iowa
Yeah I wondered that too. Not sure when/if that inspection ever takes place, or if it just needs to be on the plans.
 

Tobor_8thMan

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 15, 2013
Messages
3,712
Reaction score
2,232
Location
Go 97 miles and take a right...
Really want an inspection on record otherwise, if there is an issue, insurance may not cover non inspected work. As an example, there is a problem with the electricity going to the new room. There is a fire. Insurance refuses to pay unless the work was inspected.

Hopefully, this will not happen!

On the flip side once the county tax hounds realize you've had work done then the property tax will increase.
 
OP
H

hezagenius

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
2,271
Reaction score
2,048
Location
Iowa
Electrical question:
What outlets for brewing do people recommend?

I was planning on a 14-30 for my Auber Cube, and a 6-20 for my induction heater. And a crap ton of 20A outlets all over the room. Any other recommended outlets?
 
OP
H

hezagenius

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
2,271
Reaction score
2,048
Location
Iowa
Been a while since I posted an update. Painting is done. Just waiting on the interior door and plumbing now. And the electrician needs to swap out 2 breakers for GFCI ones. Not sure why he didn't use them for the 2 240V breakers.
I decided to hold off on epoxying the floor for now. We got a quote for about 6-7K for high end epoxy but the builder said he'd recommend just going with the existing floor for now. If it gets beat up, the epoxy will cover it if we go that route.

20211125_121214.jpg
20211125_121234.jpg
 

Zenmeister

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Oct 28, 2018
Messages
63
Reaction score
58
Location
Kirkland
Your builder is probably right about that at this current time. Putting down an impermeable floor coating (Epoxy, Polyurea, PMMA, etc) on top of fresh concrete will cause it to act as a vapor barrier. And most fresh concrete will continue "outgassing" water vapor, especially if it is a slab on grade, for a year or more after being placed. This will likely cause debonding issues or pinholes in the coating.
A couple months ago I had a polyurea floor put on my garage floor and it is beautiful and I recommend it with the right applicator. Cost was about $6.00/SF to grind the concrete and install. I recommend you consider other coatings besides epoxy. Most important is slip resistance when wet, durability, bond to concrete, and ease of cleaning.
Finally, your area looks awesome. Keep us posted as you start to put it in use.
 
Top