Brew pot question

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yewtah-brewha

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I am using what appears to be a 3 gallon pot. 3 fits fine with 2-3 inches of room for additional ingredients. Once the 3 gallons of wart is cooled do you add it to the primary fermentor and then boil 2 more gallons and then cool it?

mabey I will boil 2 gallons cool it to 100-110 degrees add it to the primary, cover it and boil the wort and then add it once it cools to 65. bringing my temp to 75-85 before pitching the yeast.

Is it bad to put 110 degree water in the plastic primary fermentors? I know some people say the plastic can leacch harmful chemicals from the plastic and I also wonder if this can be harmful to the bucket? :drunk:
 

iambeer

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I am using what appears to be a 3 gallon pot. 3 fits fine with 2-3 inches of room for additional ingredients. Once the 3 gallons of wart is cooled do you add it to the primary fermentor and then boil 2 more gallons and then cool it?

mabey I will boil 2 gallons cool it to 100-110 degrees add it to the primary, cover it and boil the wort and then add it once it cools to 65. bringing my temp to 75-85 before pitching the yeast.

Is it bad to put 110 degree water in the plastic primary fermentors? I know some people say the plastic can leacch harmful chemicals from the plastic and I also wonder if this can be harmful to the bucket? :drunk:
Plastic is made of plastic.

Although I am a fan of small batches, if you are going to make bigger batches you should just get a bigger pot.

If you are making extract batches, there is an easier way.. the just add water meathador. Well, I don't know it that well but there have been many a brewers that have exercised this method.
 

beerbreath81

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it depends on you preference. Yes you just add two more gallons of water the difference is the quality of your tap water. Lots of people will argue that it needs to be distilled because tap water as you know contain clorides, you can elimintate the clorine by simply boiling the tap water, cooling it and adding to your fermenter (before pitching yeast). But to save time you can just buy a couple gallons of distilled water for a couple bucks and add it. Just be sure to sanitize the cap area prior to opening and duming into your vessel. When i was at that stage a few years ago, I always just added straight tap water and dont recall having any issues.

Anthony
 
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yewtah-brewha

yewtah-brewha

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Thanks, My brew supplier said not to use distilled as it doesnt have any minerals, unless you plan on adding some. I just boiled 6gallons of tap water last night, cooled it and bottled it and now boiling it again for the wort. I guess its important to boil and cool before use. my last few batched I just boiled tap water cooked the wort and it never saw the first cooling stage. I guess its importans to cool it to remove the chlorine, I dont know how it does this, but I'm told it does. I dont think i'll be boiling water untill I get a bigger pot. this isn't woth the 5.00 i could have spent at walmart for bottles spring water. I'll bet it takes 2 hours to boil and cool 3 gallons and thats with using the wort chiller to cool
 

BansheeRider

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Most of the YouTube videos I've seen show people boiling with 2-3 gallons and then adding 2-3 gallons of purrified water to the fermenter from the store. My grocery store has gallons of drinking water for 67 cents.
 

diS

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You have to count boil off volume, so your 3 gallons won't be 3 gall in fermenter (it will be closer to 2 gallons)
IMO you have 3 options here:
- boil two batches and mix them in fermenter. If plastic is HDPE, you are safe to rack hot wort in it. But question is how you will chill it after you mix 2nd batch.. chilling before racking to fermenter and leaving without pitching yeast is risky since wort will be exposed to infections.
- brew high gravity wort and mix it with clean water in fermenter. This sounds most logical to me if you really want to have 5 gal batch.
- brew smaller batch
 
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yewtah-brewha

yewtah-brewha

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well. I boiled 2 gallons of water and chilled it to 100 deg. put it in the sanitized bucket, covered it and finished the other 3 gallons with wort. chilled it to 65 and then added it to the 100 deg water combined it came out to 72 degrees My yeast was started in 1 cup of 90 degree water from the 2 g's that i boiled and pitched last night at 9 pm. This morning at 9 am 12 hours later it has air lock activity of bubles every 3-5 seconds.

I dont know how there could possibly have been any contamination since everything was sanitized, all water boiled and covered. If it got contaminated from my cover being off for the few seconds periodicly while I checked temps, then I better think about converting my brew room into a emergency room and have a team of specialists come in and sanitise everything. LOL
 

mdgagne

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When I did partial boils I always picked up a few gallons of spring water and put it in the freezer at the beginning of the brew day. For a few dollars its a lot less hassle and doubles as an awesome way to cool your wort to pitching temperatures quickly.

Just make sure to mix it in well before taking a hydro reading, otherwise you're reading will be inaccurate due to stratification.
 
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