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Bought a Keg for keggle...but it has a hole in the bottom?

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DrewC

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I just bought a Miller keg at a scrap metal yard. After I left, I noticed a small hole in the bottom, maybe a 1/4 inch in diameter. It looks factory drilled. I'm at work so I can't test it, cut off the top, etc. Does any one have one of these that can confirm this is ok and this is an "outer" layer? or did I buy an unusable keg that won't hold liquid?
 

P-J

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When you get home, take a pix of it so we can see what you are dealing with.

If indeed it is a hole drilled into the keg, it can be repaired.

P-J
 

broadbill

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Its probably not OK, depending on where the hole is. One option is to use the keg up-side down. I believe there are people who have used the keg upside down: cut the bottom out of a keg then hooked a SS fixture to the tap fixture to drain. That might be an option for you.

Pics would help.

Edit to add....its probably not good "as-is"...you might have to fix it.
 
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Sounds like it's on the lip on the outside of the keg? If so, this is desired. They're drilled to vent. If you buy a keg without this hole and you plan on direct firing it, drill the hole. There have been explosions due to no vent for pressure to release.
 

Copperpots_Brewing

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IrregularPulse said:
Sounds like it's on the lip on the outside of the keg? If so, this is desired. They're drilled to vent. If you buy a keg without this hole and you plan on direct firing it, drill the hole. There have been explosions due to no vent for pressure to release.
Agreed. I also have a miller keg and there are a couple small holes drilled around the side wall at the top and bottom. Like on the top, where the handles are and on the bottom where the sides extend to act as a stand almost. As you heat a keg up, it can build pressure, which you want those holes for air pressure to escape.
 

Bobby_M

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I think everyone missed it. It's pretty common for a scrap yard to reject pressure vessels that are still intact. They will often require at least a 1/4" hole to be visibly drilled before they'll buy it.

Why not just have that side be the side that you cut out for the top?


Still, take a picture for best advice.
 

day_trippr

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I think everyone missed it. It's pretty common for a scrap yard to reject pressure vessels that are still intact. They will often require at least a 1/4" hole to be visibly drilled before they'll buy it.[...]
Fwiw, a drilled keg may have been confiscated by the cops. It's common practice here for kegs snagged at under-age parties to be held as evidence, then rendered useless with a strategically drilled hole, before they're sent to the scrap yard. So, two crimes per keg ;)

Cheers!
 

gingerdawg

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I bought 2 de-comissioned kegs. One had a hole drilled in the top, and the other in the bottom. I cut the top out of #1 anyway, but I had to weld up #2. (after cutting out the top) I still haven't gotten around to grinding out that weld. It's a PITA to work inside the keg
 

stlbeer

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I got a keg that had a hole in the side. I simply put a SS screw and bolt in it to seal it up. It won't work as a pressure vessel, but it works great as a keggle.
 
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DrewC

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My hole is directly in on the bottom, dead center. I am going to use it as direct fire as a HLT. I like the stainless steel screw idea to plug it up but I assume I would need a washer to make it water tight. I doubt it will take the heat from a burner.
 

audger

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a metal washer could work- if you could tap some threads into that thin metal that is... which is going to be difficult. you could weld a small metal half coupler or other bung to thread something into. but at that point you might as well just weld the hole closed.
 

kevink

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use a soft metal for the washers if you go that route... like copper.
 

mccumath

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Ah. Sounds like the keg is no good... That is a bummer... I suppose I could pay for the shipping to me if you want to offload that piece of junk to me...

All kidding aside, it is very, very difficult to find old sanke kegs in my part of Idaho. Lots of non-drinking religious folks 'round these parts...
 

mobilecabinworks

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If you are willing to spend a few bucks take it to a welder and ask him to put a quick TIG weld on it and grind it smooth and flat.
 

bribo179

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If the hole is dead center in the bottom you could use it as an electric keggle...drill the hole out more and mount an element.
 

AiredAle

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I'd silver solder a short 1/4" stainless bolt into the hole, and be done with it. By no means is your keg ruined or useless.
 
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DrewC

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How much do you think a weld would run?
 
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DrewC

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Airedale, I've soldered copper water pipe before, is what you're suggesting similar. If you could explain further I would appreciate it as this sounds like something I could do.
 

GNBrews

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+1 to the bottom drain
I think you're missing the point, he wants to use it as a keggle. How would you guys suggest that he cover the hole for the sanke coupler? And if he goes that route, how will that "cover" stand up to the flames of a burner? How will it sit on the burner?
 

joeybeer

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In SC my welder charges $10 for a sanitary TIG welded 1inch coupler .. I'm sure he'd charge the same for that repair ... ( I was worried how much he'd charge till I asked !)
 

joeybeer

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GNBrews said:
I think you're missing the point, he wants to use it as a keggle. How would you guys suggest that he cover the hole for the sanke coupler? And if he goes that route, how will that "cover" stand up to the flames of a burner? How will it sit on the burner?
If the burner is clear in the center (mines not) I'd use a triclamp, a 24"SS pipe, a triclamp and a valve... It would be great !
 
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DrewC

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Problem solved...the scrap metal yard had another with no holes. Thanks for all the suggestions.
 

AiredAle

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DrewC, go to the sticky sectioin of this (DIY) form and look through the 600 or so posts about silver soldering stainless steel. This is a great place to learn what to do and what not to do when silver soldering. It is harder to do well than sweating copper pipe due to the nature of stainless steel, but once done works really well and is reversible unlike welding.
 
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