Bottling w/ keg and beer gun

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

moreb33rplz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2014
Messages
597
Reaction score
229
I have four wild/sour beers I've been aging for about a year, and I'm looking to bottle them in the next month or two. I was going to buy a dedicated corny keg and rack from my carboys to the keg to force carbonate, use a beer gun to bottle, clean/sanitize the keg like normal, then put the next wild beer in it and repeat.

- Do I need to replace o-rings, gaskets, tubing, and other plastic things between one wild batch to another? I used different microbes in each batch but they're all a blend of brett, lacto, pedio, and sacc
- After all this I want to use the beer gun to bottle clean beers, if I replace all the plastic and sanitize the hell out of the metal, how safe do you think my future batches are from contamination?
 

Broken Crow

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2020
Messages
49
Reaction score
53
With proper cleaning and sanitizing (without pulling anything apart), you should be fine as long as all the parts were in sound condition and properly assembled to begin with. PBW and StarSan don't care wether you're making beer, cider, wine or even growing your own penicillin when it comes time to clean and sanitize. The part doing one after the other is what caught my attention: I haven't done a wild myself, but I know that different brews seem to have different amounts of time to fully carbonate. When I bottle from a keg with my Blichmann Beer Gun, AND QuickCarb, following the recommended time/temp/psi it still has to sit under the proper pressure and temperature at least 2 days for my mild, and 3 for my ESB to get a proper pour/fill. I've had the BeerGun a couple years now and haven't had to relace anything on it yet and I've never had an infection.
 
OP
OP
M

moreb33rplz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2014
Messages
597
Reaction score
229
Thanks for the advice. As far as the 'one after the other, I mean I'm going to keg one, force carb it for 14 ish days, bottle it, then repeat with the next and so on. So bottling my 4 batches will take a couple months
 
OP
OP
M

moreb33rplz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2014
Messages
597
Reaction score
229
Why not bottle condition them?
You mean use priming sugar/yeast and bottle? I wanted to do the keg + beer gun route so I could guarantee precise co2 level, minimize o2 (questionable if necessary from what I read), and make it easier to bottle 4 batches. I do plan to bottle condition them in the sense of having them stored at cellar temps for a long time
 
OP
OP
M

moreb33rplz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2014
Messages
597
Reaction score
229
From my reading on milk the funk I didn't see a clear advantage beer quality wise to priming vs force carbonating but I'm open to hear otherwise
 

jerrylotto

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2020
Messages
481
Reaction score
329
Location
North Chelmsford
If you use brett on these, it's going to be a lot harder to sanitize. The treatment I found works is to put all the equipment open and disassembled into a large plastic bag, tape it to the front of an ozone generator and run it on the porch for 12 hours.
 

Beermeister32

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2013
Messages
1,147
Reaction score
1,829
Location
Southern California
Do I need to replace o-rings, gaskets, tubing, and other plastic things between one wild batch to another? I used different microbes in each batch but they're all a blend of brett, lacto, pedio, and sacc
Depends how crazy you are about sours. If it were me, I’d for sure clean and sanitize between sour batches.

When you go back to regular ales and lagers, that would be the time to boil, replace, sanitize the heck out of everything.

In fact I’d use a separate dedicated set on the sours if available to completely eliminate the possibility of cross-contamination.
 
Top