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Bottling sugars

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Pesho

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Does it matter what type of sugar you use at the bottling stage, Ive heard of not using glucose at this stage but what sugar gives the beat results and with which method.

Thanks in advance

Pesho
 

DeRoux's Broux

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Pesho said:
Does it matter what type of sugar you use at the bottling stage, Ive heard of not using glucose at this stage but what sugar gives the beat results and with which method.

Thanks in advance

Pesho
when i bottled i used dark brown sugar for ESB's, IPA's, Porters, and Stouts. corn sugar for all others. you can use dried malt extract (dme) too, but i'd stay away from table sugar if you can.
 

DeRoux's Broux

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Pesho said:
forgive my ignorance but what is corn sugar alll this gets me is blank looks in every shop.

Pesh
corn sugar is dextrose. it's a type of sugar that is easily consumed by yeast left in the beer to carbonate it. most shops and recipes just refer to it as corn sugar "for priming".
 

RogerN

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DeRoux's Broux said:
but i'd stay away from table sugar if you can.
Why is that? I've used this and got adequate results. But if you give me a good reason to use something else I'll give it a go.

Cheers,

Roger.
 

DeRoux's Broux

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according to the guy's at my homebrew shop, the refined white table sugar is not consumed as well by the remaining yeast in the bottle, as is the corn or brown sugar. the refining process (from what i was told) strips the fermentable sugars down. i've read that somewhere too, just can't remeber where. maybe in an issue of Brew Your Own magazine???? i may be way off base, but like i said, that's what was told to me from my shop. those guy's have been doing it for 27 years......
 

RogerN

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Thanks for that, it may be time to use another type of sugar for priming.

Roger.
 

DeRoux's Broux

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RogerN said:
Thanks for that, it may be time to use another type of sugar for priming.

Roger.
or maybe, they guy at the HBS is just trying to push his wares! :p

give it a try and see if you notice a difference? maybe a finer bubble in the carbonation (which is one reason some prefer "natural" carbonation as opposed the forced carb w/ co2), which is supposidly better for the brew too. who knows? it just gives us something to haggle over on the forum, right!?!?!?!? :D
 

RogerN

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I bottle all my beers now so if anyone can suggest the best type of sugar (and reasons :D ) for bottling I'd be interested.
I use Belgian candy sugar in my brews but haven't used it to prime. Not sure why, scared of the unknown probably :confused:

Roger.
 

bikebryan

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DeRoux's Broux said:
give it a try and see if you notice a difference? maybe a finer bubble in the carbonation (which is one reason some prefer "natural" carbonation as opposed the forced carb w/ co2), which is supposidly better for the brew too. who knows? it just gives us something to haggle over on the forum, right!?!?!?!? :D
Oh please. CO2 is CO2. One method won't produce any finer bubbles than the other. The solution doesn't care where the CO2 comes from and the CO2 get's into the solution by the same method - pressure within the closed container forces it to dissolve into the solution.
 
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