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Bottling and 'cold filtering?'

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My first ever batch has been fermenting for two weeks (primary and secondary combined). I believe (correct me if im wrong) that I'm ready to bottle. Everything has gone smoothly so far. I have all my facts straight on priming (or so I think).
Once the beer is in the bottle, do I immediately set them in the fridge to 'age' or do they remain in a 'cool dark place' as it was when it was in secondary? If they do go in the fridge is there a certain temp that I should keep? I have a keg fridge now (don't kill me... it's Bud Light) which I will be converting over for exclusive use in my brewing hobby so I can set the temp to whatever is required.
I have also seen mention of 'cold filtering' but have found no reference to the technique. I would imagine this is just allowing your beer to age at lower temperatures once bottled? If someone could please give me a little insight into the 'cold filtering' technique before I bottle this weekend, it would be much appreciated :)
 

NUCC98

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DyerNeedOfBeer said:
My first ever batch has been fermenting for two weeks (primary and secondary combined). I believe (correct me if im wrong) that I'm ready to bottle. Everything has gone smoothly so far. I have all my facts straight on priming (or so I think).
Once the beer is in the bottle, do I immediately set them in the fridge to 'age' or do they remain in a 'cool dark place' as it was when it was in secondary? If they do go in the fridge is there a certain temp that I should keep? I have a keg fridge now (don't kill me... it's Bud Light) which I will be converting over for exclusive use in my brewing hobby so I can set the temp to whatever is required.
I have also seen mention of 'cold filtering' but have found no reference to the technique. I would imagine this is just allowing your beer to age at lower temperatures once bottled? If someone could please give me a little insight into the 'cold filtering' technique before I bottle this weekend, it would be much appreciated :)
Hey there!

OK, cold filtering, as I've done it, is basically letting your secondary sit for about a week in much colder temps. For me, it was up in my attic space. With the weather the way it's been lately, getting cold temps isn't a problem. After bottling though, I'd put them in a dark, maybe room-temp environment. Whatever yeast is left over needs to wake up and start chompin' away at the priming sugar to carbonate your brew. After 1 - 2 weeks, you can start puttin' them in the fridge.
 

homebrewer_99

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True. You need to let the priming sugar build up your desired carbonation level. You should try a bottle every week until you get the level you want then place the batch in the fridge to get cold and retard the carbonation process.

after that the cold will make more of the yeasties and other ingredients drop out resulting in a clearer beer. Remember to pour the beer (slowly without stopping) into a glass without disturbing the sediment on the bottom. This is what's called a "one pour".

Once you finish pouring then rinse the bottle out several times and you'll never have to scrub them out again.
 

Janx

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Just to make perfectly clear what the other two have said, if you put it in the fridge, it will not carbonate. It needs to be at fermentation temps. Remember, another small fermentation is happening in the bottle to make the carbonation happen, and that means it needs the same temps you had in the secondary.

Cheers! :D
 

wwgiese

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DyerNeedOfBeer said:
My first ever batch has been fermenting for two weeks (primary and secondary combined). I believe (correct me if im wrong) that I'm ready to bottle. Everything has gone smoothly so far. I have all my facts straight on priming (or so I think).
Once the beer is in the bottle, do I immediately set them in the fridge to 'age' or do they remain in a 'cool dark place' as it was when it was in secondary? If they do go in the fridge is there a certain temp that I should keep? I have a keg fridge now (don't kill me... it's Bud Light) which I will be converting over for exclusive use in my brewing hobby so I can set the temp to whatever is required.
I have also seen mention of 'cold filtering' but have found no reference to the technique. I would imagine this is just allowing your beer to age at lower temperatures once bottled? If someone could please give me a little insight into the 'cold filtering' technique before I bottle this weekend, it would be much appreciated :)
Keep in cool dry place for a couple of weeks then put a couple in the fridge and try out to see if ready. If cabonated then you can put the lot in the fridge. If you put in the frige right away you may stop the beer from conditionig properly. After the beer is conditioned it usualy improves if left in the fridge for several weeks. Cold filtering is done before you bottle it and it takes filtering equipment and co2 tank, requlators and kegs.
 
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